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alg787s alg787s is offline
 
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Recognizing the End of a Sentence in Writing
Old 04-18-2011, 08:23 PM
 
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I have several of my students who are having a difficult time recognizing where to place a period when they write more than one sentence. They know they need a period, but they tend to put it at the end of the line or randomly throughout the story. How do you teach your students to recognize where the end of a sentence is? Thanks!


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Old 04-19-2011, 02:09 PM
 
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I have been going through this too!!! I would love to see if anyone has any solutions on this. My higher students are starting to get the concept. Most of my kids aren't. :/
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BeeHappy BeeHappy is offline
 
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This is one of the many places where
Old 04-19-2011, 02:11 PM
 
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reading and writing overlap. Use sentence strips from the grade level texts that students are reading. Cut up the words and put them in pocket charts. Leave the periods and capital letters/first words separate. I think it always helps to give kids examples and non-examples. If you have 2 pocket charts this will work even better. Do a shared reading lesson with the 2 charts - reading the one with punctuation and then the one without punctuation, emphasizing that there are no pauses and how hard it is to read/comprehend.

Then, work on modeling your own shared writing lessons with kid friendly writing. Again - using a T chart, show an example and a non-example of the same thing without the 'bookends' of the capitalized 1st word/punctuation. Using My Turn, Our Turn, and Your Turn - read both the example and the non-example. Teach about why it is important to pause/stop where the sentence ends.
  1. It makes sense. We can understand the sentence better.
  2. We need to breathe at the end of the sentence when we read it.
  3. The pauses sound natural at the end of the sentences when we read them out loud. They help us with our fluency, our rate of reading and our expression.
After you and the kids read the "non-example", go back and fix it, adding the capitalization and the punctuation.

Then moving to the students writing, use mentor texts of student work to show more examples and non-examples. Have the kids help decide where to put the punctuation/capitalization. This needs to be modeled many times. And kids need center activities to practice grammar/sentence structure/conventions. Cut up sentences and let them put them together in pocket charts or at the table. Make sure you provide the punctuation and capitalization for them to 'fix' it. There are lots of sentence activities that you can create or purchase for center practice!

After several lessons on it, I ask my kids to read their writing out loud to themselves and find the natural places they pause. Where they pause, they should try making a period, double check by reading one more time with the periods this time, then have a peer or me validate their work. I have a student that is a fabulour writer now. She could not write her name at the beginning of the year, but is now writing complex expressive sentences. She doesn't use any punctuation in her first draft, but when I ask her to go back to read to herself, she is able to place the punctuation accurately. Her next level will be reading it and editing BEFORE she brings it to me to show me!


I hope this helps!

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smacri smacri is offline
 
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Sentence structure
Old 04-23-2011, 02:27 PM
 
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I love this idea! Do you have a photo of the pocket chart activity that you can email to me?
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Sorry, I do not at this time, but this
Old 04-23-2011, 03:00 PM
 
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should give you a good idea of what it might look like. I would remove the capitalization and have the words from the sentences run on together for the non-example. So it would look like sentence strips cut up into words and in the non-example it would look like this:
  • can you drive a car i can not pick an apple i can swim can you play with me i can ride a horse are you my friend what is your sentence
You could show the kids how important punctuation is by trying to read this without any pauses and ask them to tell you what you just said. Then try to punctuate in a variety of places that make some sense, but don't end up saying the same thing. Example:
  • Can you drive a car? I can not. Pick an apple. I can swim. Can you? Play with me. I can ride a horse. Are you? My friend, what is your sentence?

vs.
  • Can you drive a car? I can not pick an apple. I can swim. Can you play with me? I can ride a horse. Are you my friend? What is your sentence?
This is just an example that had a clear picture of sentences using the pocket chart and sentence strips, but you can come up with a better example that might make it much more obvious that the meaning is changed so much simply by punctuation. One example that I recall is in a book called "Max's Words". The author gives a perfect example in the book that you could write out on the sentence strips. The order of the words and the punctuation completely changes the meaning!

I love this book as it has many lessons that come to mind. I use it to introduce Writer's Workshop, telling kids that we are all going to become word collectors!

I will work on taking pictures of the 2 pocket charts I create, and getting it up on my website...one of these days. In the meantime, I hope this helps.

Bee Happy




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