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Homework Ideas
Old 10-08-2012, 07:50 AM
 
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I teach a multi-age class for children with autism grades 3-6. Does anyone have ideas for homework for the low functioning students? These students are developmentally around a 3 year old with limited language. The parents are ASKING for homework. I want it to be meaningful and not add to the stress of the household.
Any suggestions?????


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homework
Old 10-08-2012, 05:13 PM
 
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Here is my thought...If parents want homework...make it life skills...helping set the table, sorting the forks and spoons from the dishwasher, stacking plates, bowls, cups. It may require some moving around of dishes so if these students are younger can reach what they need. They can learn to set the table using specially made place mats that show where things go. Have them sort towels, shirts, socks for laundry. Special folding "jigs" can be made to help them fold laundry. Those are just my thoughts.....my biggest question would be...what kind of homework do the parents want and are these parents really going to put forth the effort it requires to assist their child with any kind of "paper/pencil/cut/paste", etc "homework"? Maybe I'm a little pessimistic....but more or less with my experience.

I would try to stick with things that are functional life skills. Even learning to sweep or vacccuum. I think Texas has a life skills/functional program that you can google....I just can't recall the name at this time.

Again just my thoughts :-)
Best of luck
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Old 10-08-2012, 06:35 PM
 
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Those are great suggestions. However parents really want pen and paper work. Academic work only.
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:19 AM
 
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what about writing out their names and phone numbers; address; school name and teacher's name?
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Old 10-10-2012, 09:52 AM
 
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If it has to be paper/pencil/crayon tasks have them color. Have them start with typical 3 year old crayon/paper tasks. Have them color an apple and have the letter on the page. Have it a traceable, not colorable letter. Pre-school level readiness activities may be appropriate for them if they have the fine motor skills. If the parents complain, explain the purpose of having their children go through the same steps that are required for all children in order for them to be able to perform higher academic exercises. They need a preschool curriculum for homework to work on those skills that are the foundation for higher level skills.

If the parents need more cajoling, make them understand that a house built on a poor foundation (those readiness skills not in place) will crumble. You want them to be working on foundation skills so that they can have access to the more difficult skills and end up being successful. Careful with the wording so they understand that foundation is the skill set, not the development level of their child.


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Old 10-13-2012, 01:21 AM
 
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I would do reading. Have the students check out library books or use an online book source (www.tarheelreader.com). Let the parents read every night and help their child complete a book journal by writing the title and author then allowing the child to write (in whatever ever way is appropriate - drawing, scribbling, using an alternate pencil). While they're reading, they can address the child's communication goals by commenting, asking questions, using any AAC the child has, having the child communicate (by touching, signing, using an aac device, etc.) phrases such as: read it again, turn the page, tell me about that, look at that, etc. It's based in academics but gives tons of options for developing language and communication skills which is what these guys need most. Here are a couple of links with more information:

http://aacintervention.com/site/cpag...c_id=180009852 Scroll down to the August Tip of the Month

http://aacintervention.com/site/cpag...c_id=180009852 Go to the February Tip of the Month
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