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Input on behavior system
Old 08-27-2012, 06:26 PM
 
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I was hoping some of you could give me some feedback about my behavior management system I am planning on using in my classroom. First of all let me tell you that I am teaching a K-3 emotional support classroom.
I am giving each student a daily "3 strikes and you're out" behavior chart. They will get 3 warnings in each subject before they lose their point for that subject. They will have the opportunity to earn 10 points a day.
This will tie into a level system. I am thinking of having a 5 level system. Everyone will start on level 3 and will have the opportunity to work their way up the levels. 7 or more points is considered a "good day" if they have 3 good days in a week they move up a level, 3 bad days they move down a level. Of course there are non-negotiables, such as any physical aggression automatically moves you down to level 0, etc.
On top of that I have a marble jar which will be a class management system, they can earn a marble for walking quietly in the hall, having a good lunch period, etc. Once they reach 100 marbles it will be a class reward.
My question is, is this too much for students in K-3 to take in?? Any help with level systems would be great! Thanks


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Old 08-27-2012, 06:36 PM
 
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I think it's too complex.

I think you're focusing on negatives.

Since it's emotional support classroom, you're going to have to set explicit guidelines per student. Yes, general rules need to be in place...keep hands/feet to yourself; remain in area (no running ), but each child may have their own thing.

My district has a tracking paper broken up in to 8 sections (each our or each class plus lunch and pullouts) and you put each child's behavior goal and track that.

Child A might need to work on communicating needs rather than throwing.

Child B might need to ask for a break or help before refusing to complete classwork.

Individualize their goals and reinforce & model how to get a good "score".

Does this make sense?

to start, I'd just worry about the day and not 3/5 in a week. I think that's too far away for a reward for the little babies. they need that immediate reinforcer and each day they need some type of recognition...a high five, good note home, hug, extra water break, ticket for a prize.

Now, if you do give raffle ticket type prizes, you could have a menu and they could "buy" something on Fridays.

In addition to the tracking of "poor behaviors" you could always ALWAYS do positive reinforcement through the day. You could do tickets when you catch them do the right thing. They could collect those and then buy something on Friday. This way they get the ticket each day they behave and then get an ultimate prize.

i wouldn't try to roll all that out week 1, either.
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Old 08-28-2012, 09:12 AM
 
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Miller gave some good advice. Your system is too much for me, and I am an adult. While you may have to tally to keep track of behavioral problems, positive reinforcement and a positive plan typically works better. Also, delayed postive or negative consequences are not appropriate for students this young when they have emotional difficulties. The consequence is too far removed from the behaviors and the consequence takes into account the sum total of all behaviors.

Have you had training classes regarding behavior management for students with emotional disabilities? I'm wondering because everything you mentioned really seems like regular general education classroom management techniques with a slight twist and lumping many together. Not one seems to be a technique geared toward working with students with emotional disabilties. If you have, I would like to know what that training was. If not, I understand since this is a very common occurrence where I am from. Many teachers are thrown to the wolves without proper training.
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I moved to 4/5 EBD
Old 08-28-2012, 04:09 PM
 
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I have attached the "Level of Success" sign I made from Vista Print. The students can earn 100 points a day. Each level gains them new privileges. When I ordered it, I was going to use clothes pins to have them move up. Once I received it I decided to hang it on my whiteboard. The students have a magnet that they move each day they earn enough points. There is also a daily point sheet I can share if you are interested.

Behavior Consequences
1. Warning
2. Lose one point
3. Move seat
4. Time Out in room
5. Behavior Specialist or AP
Attached Files
File Type: doc Behavior Levels.doc (64.5 KB, 52 views)
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agree
Old 09-01-2012, 02:37 AM
 
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I agree with the others. The problem with 3 strikes is it will probably set the students off more. At this point, they don't have the skills to deal with consequences and you are going to have to teach/model that. Never TAKE anything away from student. They just have to earn it. Meeting expectations will earn stars (or whatever) and those stars can earn privileges. Praise when expectations are met and be very specific. "I really like the way you are sitting with your hands to yourself." "I love the way you said please." EBD students (in general) have no frame of references for appropriate behavior so you have to teach, reinforce and teach again. Their behavior has met their needs so they need replacment behaviors and coping strategies. It's a long process.


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Old 09-03-2012, 04:28 AM
 
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I teach 6 spec ed. students, who have a range of exceptionalities. What I did is create a reward catalogue. The rewards are not edibles because I have some students who are obsessed with food, but rather they are practicable rewards. For instance, kids can take off their shoes, wear a hat, play on the ipad for 15 minutes once a week, listen 2 ipod for 1 day during independent time, sit at teacher's desk for half a day, etc. In order to achieve the rewards, students will have to show me that they are trying, working cooperatively, non-behavioral, etc. IF they show me this, they get a pompom that goes into their bucket filler bags. They can put the pompom in the bag to feel more responsible and proud. In the beginning I would give a lot more pompoms in order for it to be effective. Every Friday we will hold the reward party and I will cash in their pompoms and give them a coupon. I also hold the student of the week during this period too. It is a great incentive and an immediate reward. I find that focusing on the negative allows for perseverations and anxiety levels to rise. This program also gives them choice and flexibility, which is something that they tend to lack in most schools.
Hope this helps,
Jevon
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:45 AM
 
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I think, since you are in an emotional support classroom, you should focus on positives and make it simple. Ensure you are talking about appropriate behaviors and discuss emotions. Role play - little ones love role playing, especially if the teacher is doing it as well. Discuss appropriate ways to react to situations. Never take anything away, like taking away points or a going down a level. Reinforce positive behavior. Consistently use positive verbal praise, I have found this extremely important. Consider a ticket system where students receive a ticket for appropriate behavior then are able to earn a prize at the end of the week. Just a note: don't rely too heavily on tangible rewards or tickets all the time. The students will not want to do things right because they should, they will just do it for the reward.
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