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What do you think of center-based programs for "moderate" needs?

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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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What do you think of center-based programs for "moderate" needs?
Old 03-31-2016, 04:45 PM
 
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Does anyone else have this in their district? It's a huge point of contention in mine. I teach in the "mild needs" program where kids can get about 3-4 hours of sped support per week. I have about 30 kids on my caseload and share a para with another teacher. If students aren't making progress in our program, we're supposed to refer them to the "moderate needs" program which is center-based at another school. Of course it's a million hoops, meetings, and tons of documentation to get them over there. In this program they can get about 15 hours per week of sped support and the sped teacher has 8-10 kids with 2 paras working under her. A lot of people (parents and school staff) dislike that our district does this because they feel it's discriminatory to send students to another building. It's also really tough on schools like mine that only house "mild needs" because when we do get a high needs student, there is no extra support and at the absolute minimum it takes 3-4 months to jump through all of the hoops to get them placed in moderate needs or severe needs. We don't have the option of getting a 1:1 para, even if we're in the process of proving a child needs a different program. My sped team thinks it's unfair that one school (the one that houses moderate needs) gets all of the support. There, if a child needs more services the transition is immediate and seamless. When people complain, my sped director says that we have to do it this way because we have such limited funding (school funding is horrendous in my state) and financially it makes more sense to stack one school with resources rather than trying to spread everything across the entire district. I understand what she is saying. If all of the higher needs kids were spread out and the resources were divided up I don't think they would end up with as much support as they can get now. On the other hand, it does feel horrible to have to send students away. The rest of my sped team insists that "no one else does it this way." So I am curious, does your district do something like this/what do you think of programs like this?


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Old 03-31-2016, 06:34 PM
 
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No, each school serves all level of disability/all disabilities (except the public charters, who generally do not serve students with disabilities; if students with disabilities go there, they do so knowing they will not receive services- they can get services in their home school). I honestly didn't realize school districts still separated out moderate level of disabilities! Severe/profound, I could imagine keeping to one school. Much lower prevalence and might higher level of needs. Moderate disabilities? I thought the trend was to keep students in their home schools as much as possible now.
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Old 04-01-2016, 10:14 AM
 
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In my district all mild/moderate are in resource or regular ed and almost all 30+ school have a profound class.
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readandweep readandweep is offline
 
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Moving away from this, but
Old 04-01-2016, 01:11 PM
 
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My cooperative used to lump severe and profound and moderate together. One area school would have bd and the other life skills. Autism went to what was most appropriate.

Now many schools find it cheaper to keep everyone. They take advantage of parents who want their kids at their home school.

So now you have a bunch of self contained rooms with autism, behavior, mild, moderate and physically disabled all in one room. Many profound students are too medically fragile to be in these rooms.
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Old 04-01-2016, 07:42 PM
 
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Quote:
So now you have a bunch of self contained rooms with autism, behavior, mild, moderate and physically disabled all in one room. Many profound students are too medically fragile to be in these rooms.
That sounds horrible! We do have an SSN (severe needs) program in a separate school from the moderate needs program. However, from what I hear moderate needs often gets stuck with kids that really should be in SSN. Moderate needs is supposed to be for kids that need a significant amount of support with academics but are independent/functional without 1:1 adult with navigating the school environment. Each moderate needs teacher seems to end up with a couple of kids that have more adaptive needs every year though.

We also have a separate program for emotional disabilities but it seems impossible to get kids into it. In the 3 years I've worked at my school we've never gotten anyone in, and I've heard there are now only 2 kids in the entire district in the program. We have kids that are extremely violent and destructive, to the point of tearing up classrooms (and I mean really tearing up, ruining supplies and expensive technology, etc.) on a daily basis. We also have kids that are only able to attend a half day due to their severe behavior and they are never even considered for this other program.


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Charter schools are required to serve SPED
Old 04-03-2016, 07:31 AM
 
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I just wanted to say that in my charter school we have a huge SPED and 504 population and we serve students with disabilities. It is illegal to not serve students.
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Old 04-03-2016, 12:32 PM
 
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Most charters in my area only serve students with mild disabilities. They say they don't have the programming for students with other needs. Last year my teammate came from a charter and she didn't understand why I had to keep a student with severe behavior needs on my caseload. She explained that at her previous school they were told they wouldn't accept any student who "significantly changed or jeopardized their program."
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