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Prekteach13
 
 
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When a student won't get out of the car....
Old 02-21-2016, 03:02 PM
 
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I have a K student who has autism and is non verbal. He has lots of aggressive/violent behaviors and we've gone through 7 aides for him this year because his behaviors are so extreme. Before December, we were finally seeing some improvement and decreased behavior, but then I went on maternity leave for 2 months and just came back this week and everything is 10x worse. This student is now refusing to get out of the car during morning car rider drop off. An assistant opens the door and he runs to the back seat, and seat hops while laughing and punching/biting anyone who tries to get him out. He is a very large student, and typically cannot be lifted even by 2 staff members.

How would you approach this? Would you physically remove a child from the car if attempts at using behavior charts/reinforcers were unsuccessful?


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I would not
Old 02-21-2016, 03:17 PM
 
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I would not remove the child from the car physically. I'm not sure of the liability if the child gets injured, if staff gets injured, if the person dropping off gets injured, or if the vehicle gets injured. I would not put myself in a position that any of that would happen.
I would set up a social story for the parent to use at home that outlines what will happen and how the child should behave and in which order when getting in the car, riding in the car, and leaving the car. I would have a reward system in place for the child when he does come to school and gets out of the car appropriately.
Is the child appropriately in a child car seat in the car or does he just sit on the seat using a regular seatbelt? There are 4-point harness systems that some of our students use in the special ed vehicles that do facilitate sitting on the seat and not wandering. Is there a possibility of the parent looking into that sort of system for the car?
I wish you the best.
Kathy
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Old 02-21-2016, 04:36 PM
 
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Yep - exactly what Kathy said. The parent should be the one responsible for the removing the student from the vehicle. And, man - I'm just going to be sending you some positive vibes this week. 7 paras in less than a year is rough.
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Positive vibes here too
Old 02-21-2016, 05:24 PM
 
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What PP said.

Are you gathering data on this? It sounds like attention seeking behavior. If he is behaving like this, I'm sure he is holding up the car drop off line and getting lots of angry glares and honking horns.

How does whoever drive him to school get him in the car? IME if he truly does not want to come to school he would put up a big fuss about getting in the car. If he is just acting like this when they arrive at school, it probably is attention seeking.

If that is the case, I would not even go to the car. Whoever drops him off needs to park and walk him in or meet you or your staff at certain point.

I had a student who displayed all sorts of behaviors about getting on the bus. Turns out the bus route had changed. Is something like this happening with your student?

You could address this in the social story or suggest that whoever drives him to school eventually try and vary their route.
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Old 02-29-2016, 05:05 PM
 
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Can the child ride on the bus? That was always a big deal for my preschool students. They loved it!


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Agreed
Old 03-01-2016, 03:00 PM
 
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Definitely don't forcibly remove him from the car - that's how kids end up getting hurt and districts end up getting sued.

Any possibility he's being abused or bullied, at home or at school?

Especially since he's nonverbal, he may be communicating that the only way he can.

Does he have any other way to communicate (devices, sign language, PECS, anything)?
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Help:)
Old 03-04-2016, 11:07 PM
 
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I recently went to a seminar featuring Temple Grandin as well as a great behavior intervention specialist, Jim Ball. Mr Ball guided that one of the number one tactics that you can use with autism students is the use of videos called Video Modeling. If you present a simple video (you can use Apple I movies app) on getting out of the car, the student may be more compliant. This can be used with simple -three -word phrases. Be sure that your tone is also very calm. Also, peer buddies are also a great strategy...
Hope this helps
Michele Joint
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Old 04-07-2016, 05:14 AM
 
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If this is simply attention getting, In my opinion...and that is only what it is..... I believe whoever is bringing him, needs to park and bring the child in, meet para at a designated area, say their good byes and "I love yous", then leave so child can begin his day so he can begin re-establishing routine. That should take any and all concerns regarding liability. I would also suggest some training for the aides. (I feel for you....believe me.....)

If this is more than attention getting, a Functional Behavior Assessment may need to be considered as well as a behavior support plan.

Have you tried a penny board?
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