RtI - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

RtI

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,954
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,954
Senior Member
RtI
Old 04-14-2016, 08:15 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I saw a post on the teacher issues board where people are complaining about RtI being used to keep students from sped identification. That is the prevailing attitude among gen ed teachers at my school as well. The two gen ed teachers that are on the team are great and do truly "get it" but no one else does, even when we have those teachers lead PD so that other classroom teachers can hear it from someone who is "one of them."

We have been working so hard on making our process a true "problem solving process" rather than just being a "gateway to sped" since I started working at this school 3 years ago. I honestly feel we have made no progress with this issue at all and our team is at a loss of what to do next. Teachers typically only bring students up to the team if they suspect they have a disability, despite what seems like hundreds of conversations about the purpose of the team, purpose of interventions, etc. We do not have a lengthy documentation/data process necessary for sped referral and kids are often referred after their first RtI meeting, so while I understand that "prolonging the process" is a issue in some places, it's really not at my school. Teachers come to the meeting very clearly ready to "fight" and work very hard the whole time trying to "prove" that the student has a disability. In some cases where it's obvious the student qualifies for a sped referral when we review the data prior to the meeting, we've even started the meeting by explaining that a sped referral will be completed and we would like to spend the remainder of the meeting discussing interventions/strategies since sped testing alone will not "fix" the student. Even we do this, the teacher shows no interest in problem solving and seems to be insistent on proving how disabled the student is.

The other day our psych made a joke about a specific student that was an "RtI failure" because she'd been referred to sped. After I thought about it, I couldn't think of a single student who had come through our team that a) hadn't bee referred to sped and b) the teacher was happy with the decision/agreed the student didn't need to be referred and was open to trying new ideas instead. I feel the ideas that are generated are good ones. I've been a classroom teacher myself and we have a primary classroom teacher and an intermediate classroom teacher on the team, so we're not suggesting things that are inappropriate or not doable in the classroom. Again, I know that's an issue in some schools, but I really don't think it is in mine.

If you have an effective RtI team that truly serves a "problem solving" purpose, what are you doing differently? What suggestions do you have to move our team forward?


Haley23 is online now   Reply With Quote

GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
GreyhoundGirl GreyhoundGirl is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 19,427
Senior Member

GreyhoundGirl
 
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 19,427
Senior Member

Old 04-15-2016, 12:01 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I've been on both sides of that table; a classroom teacher and a Sped teacher. I won't even talk about what's happening this year because my school is a nightmare.

I think the general thought from classroom teachers is that they generally only go through the lengthy, time consuming process if they know in their gut that the child qualifies for Sped. Most students don't make it to that point unless the teacher has already implemented many, many, many interventions of her own in the classroom. I also feel like many times sit through an RtI meeting and feel like it's an indictment on their teaching (as if they're not doing enough).

As a Sped teacher I only saw 2 cases of students making it to tier 3 and NOT qualifying for sped services.

By the time the students gets to the "problem solving" point we, as classroom teachers, are tired of "problem solving" and want action.

There's no real answer for this, it's just an "is". A school can have the best plan in place (I've worked in a school like that) or the worst plan (I'm working there now) and no matter what, it's a long and tedious process. That's just the nature of the beast.
GreyhoundGirl is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:23 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net