Looking for Special Education Programs - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

Looking for Special Education Programs

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
hueysmom hueysmom is offline
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member

hueysmom
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member
Looking for Special Education Programs
Old 05-05-2016, 01:06 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hi All,

I'm working as an instructional coach for a large school district. We are currently in the process of looking at instructional programs for our self-contained classrooms. We have a wide range of abilities from applied/life skills classes to behavioral classes for students who are near or on grade level. Our teachers are struggling with teaching multiple grade levels and subjects within one classroom, so we are looking for a solid program/curriculum that would be individualized and also have some independent components. I'm interested in learning about programs for math, reading, science and social studies. Thanks in advance for suggestions!


hueysmom is offline   Reply With Quote

tctrojan's Avatar
tctrojan tctrojan is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,212
Senior Member

tctrojan
 
tctrojan's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,212
Senior Member
No advice
Old 05-05-2016, 05:01 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

But I am anxious to see some recommendations.
tctrojan is offline   Reply With Quote
Lottalove's Avatar
Lottalove Lottalove is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,741
Senior Member

Lottalove
 
Lottalove's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,741
Senior Member
I too will be interested in what others
Old 05-06-2016, 06:59 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

may say.

Right now, I am teaching self contained BD/ED--as such, I have the exact same group by your definition:

Quote:
We have a wide range of abilities from applied/life skills classes to behavioral classes for students who are near or on grade level. Our teachers are struggling with teaching multiple grade levels and subjects within one classroom
Quote:
programs for math, reading, science and social studies.
I am supposed to be doing Wilson Reading Program for most--I don't really feel it is the best choice for some but it is all my Director has offered as a set program...

As for the other subjects, I do not have a set curriculum. I do have some success with the texts from AGS Publishing but still feel I am scrambling to pull things together on my own and juggle all the aspects of implementation.

This district doesn't devote much money to the curriculum for my class.
Lottalove is offline   Reply With Quote
momteachsis momteachsis is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,086
Senior Member

momteachsis
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,086
Senior Member
Reading and Math
Old 05-07-2016, 06:49 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

For Math we use Equals Math. You assess each student in all Math domains. Then students can be grouped according to their scores. Each lesson has 3 different levels of accommodations provided.

For Reading we use Unique Learning/News 2 You. The lessons are divided by month, and are either Science or Social Studies based. It has preassessments, and post assessments each month. The activities also have various lessons.

Both Equals and ULS have very detailed lesson plans which are easy to follow.
momteachsis is offline   Reply With Quote
Jojobean82's Avatar
Jojobean82 Jojobean82 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 119
Full Member

Jojobean82
 
Jojobean82's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 119
Full Member
Literacy
Old 05-08-2016, 02:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

For literacy we use Fountas and Pinnel, Level literacy Interventions. And for math I'm on my own.


Jojobean82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,963
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,963
Senior Member

Old 05-08-2016, 02:47 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

For math we use math-u-see. Cons are that it really is "drill and kill" and that it's not perfectly aligned with the standards (just using this program alone wouldn't hit all of the state standards). However, it does really get kids to understand the basic math skills they need for "real life." When I first saw it I was very unimpressed and thought it was boring/the kids would hate it. My kids actually love it. Over the years I have learned that my students are happiest and most engaged with activities that they can feel successful doing, even if those are "drill and kill" activities.

For reading we have several programs. Again, IMO none of them are comprehensive enough to be taught alone and cover all of the standards.
Language!- Seems pretty comprehensive, but we don't see kids for enough time to carry out the program as it's intended. Most kids get reading intervention 30 mins per day 4-5 days per week and this program is meant to be done 5 days a week for 90 minutes per day.
Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI)- IMO, this program is not intensive enough for sped, but could be okay for the behavior rooms you mentioned. I do love the library of leveled books it came with and I do my own lessons based on the books. IMO, this program is really best for kids that have simply missed instruction for some reason (previous severe behavior issues, medical issues, perhaps ELLs that had to take time to learn English first) rather than kids that have significant reading disabilities.
Fundations- Our classroom teachers teach this whole group at my school and it's been great for many students. It's a tier 2 program, so I don't use the exact program in my room, but it's been helpful to piggyback on the language/vocabulary that the students are getting from fundations, especially for my K and 1 students. For example, I teach letter names and sounds using Fundations language, but I add in more multisensory techniques such as writing letters in sand to make the program more tier 3.
Explode the Code- This is mostly a series of worksheets/packets that are again pretty "drill and kill" phonics. However, like I said before, my students really like them because they feel successful. I don't do a whole lesson based on ETC packets but a lot of my groups will do 1-2 pages per day.

I think the trouble you'll run into is that there is no "perfect program" that is simply going to "fix" sped issues. If there were such a program, everyone would just use it!
Haley23 is online now   Reply With Quote
Miller's Avatar
Miller Miller is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,965
Senior Member

Miller
 
Miller's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,965
Senior Member

Old 05-08-2016, 03:55 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I have used PCI for the past several years. It is an independent sight word reading curriculum. The lessons shouldn't be progressed until they completely know a word. So for the first 5 days my students may be together, but after that they begin to separate. I have students on a 2 year old cognitive level to a 7 year old cognitive level with reading deficits. It works best on the kdis who have attention to task and motivation to work. Some students are on lesson 50, others on 25. I like it because there are some comprehension components. There are no writing lessons, but my district adopted this to be used for kids who cannot do DIBELS, and may have beginning writing goals. It is very easy to set up and run. It's also a built-in data tracker.

For math, I have used TouchMath/TouchPoints and I like it as well. There are many supplemental items, tactile resources, computer programs, etc. This math is also the intervention math for our district.

Earobics is a computer based literacy intervention that I use for my kids who have a decent attention span and can follow directions. I have seen many of my kids grow with the use of Earobics.
Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
hueysmom hueysmom is offline
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member

hueysmom
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member

Old 05-09-2016, 05:19 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Thanks for your ideas. I used most of those programs as an AIS/Inclusion teacher. I think you misunderstood my inquiry. What I'm looking for is something for our self-contained programs, so not a "fix" as you said, but a resource for our teachers. Right now they are teaching all subjects in six grade levels and essentially having to gather all of their lessons/materials on their own. If it was just one grade level, they could modify the grade level curriculum and supplement with the programs you suggested, but again these are students with varying levels and needs.
hueysmom is offline   Reply With Quote
SpedinTx SpedinTx is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 34
Junior Member

SpedinTx
 
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 34
Junior Member

Old 05-09-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

I also have a multiple level classroom. I teach high school self contained so I have students with multiple disabilities working at a 3 month level up to students working on 4th grade level. I love the program Moby Max as it covers every subject up to 8th grade. The best part is I can go in and plug in my students goals and the program will focus on the goals for me. It tells me the next step in the goal which makes creating objectives super easy. As I have 16 subjects to teach daily with all the various levels it saves me. This way I can pull small groups and work on skill acquisition, social skills ect, without worrying that the other students are not working on meaningful material.
SpedinTx is offline   Reply With Quote
teabreak teabreak is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,648
Senior Member

teabreak
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,648
Senior Member
Different things
Old 05-09-2016, 12:37 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

You say that your teachers have multiple levels and multiple students and you want one program? Just making sure I have that right.

I don't think there is just one program for all students of all levels in any one subject area. The best bet for the teachers would be to collaborate with their grade level counterparts and see what is being taught and then adjust and modify as needed.

For instance, 8th grade students are reading Shiloh and working on close reading strategies. The special educator can read the same book or choose one at the student's level and use the same strategies for close reading.

7th grade math is working on fractions. The special education teacher can work on 1/2 to whole and back (just tossing ideas out there)

I work on grade level standards but modify what and how it is delivered to me students. 9th grade may be reading To Kill a Mockingbird so I will find another story that addresses those themes and work on the specific strategies being taught in those classes in my reading class.

Does this make sense?


teabreak is offline   Reply With Quote
pdxteacher's Avatar
pdxteacher pdxteacher is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 3,130
Senior Member

pdxteacher
 
pdxteacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 3,130
Senior Member
Unique Learning Systems
Old 05-12-2016, 06:32 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

I have a middle school self-contained class. My students' abilities range from kindergarten through fourth grade. ULS offers "bands" for elementary, middle, high school, and transition-age student. Within each band, the curriculum is divided into three access levels, from picture-level support, to higher-functioning read/answer independently. Each month the unit is focused on a different topic, and covers all subject areas. I find I have to supplement with direct-instruction in some areas, but it is a really good place to start and can stand on it's own. Hope this helps.
pdxteacher is offline   Reply With Quote
hueysmom hueysmom is offline
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member

hueysmom
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member

Old 05-17-2016, 09:57 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Thanks so much! I'll definitely look into Moby Max.
hueysmom is offline   Reply With Quote
hueysmom hueysmom is offline
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member

hueysmom
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 4
New Member

Old 05-17-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Hi Teabreak,

I understand what you're saying- I taught special ed for ten years.

What I am looking for is one program to supplement curriculum for multiple grade levels. It's easy to work with gen ed teachers and modify curriculum for a seventh grade group of students who are only working on reading. However, our teachers have self-contained classrooms containing students from many different grade levels, and they have them all day long.

For example, one teacher has nine students. One is kindergarten, one is first grade, two in second grade, two in third grade, two in fourth grade, and one in fifth grade. The students instructional levels range from pre-K through seventh grade, because this is a class for students with severe behavioral needs. This teacher is responsible for teaching these students reading, math, science and social studies, and cannot possibly do this well with students at so many different grade levels.
hueysmom is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:07 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net