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galwaygirl172 galwaygirl172 is offline
 
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Old 05-12-2016, 01:33 PM
 
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I subbed for a first grade class today. When I had a moment to speak with the actual teacher, I told her I had a little boy who told me he didn't care about his work. She told me to let him not care because he was tested for special ed and scored "too low" to be admitted into the program.
What does this even mean?! How can you score "too low?" Isn't that kind of a warning sign that the kid really needs help?


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Old 05-12-2016, 08:44 PM
 
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It probably means that that school requires an average cognitive level (i.e., IQ) in order to qualify as having a specific learning disability, and the child scored below average, but not low enough to be intellectually disabled (i.e., mentally retarded). So he's what used to be called a "gap" kid- falling in that murky range of 70-85 or so on the intellectual scale (varies from district to district what that range might be, but this is pretty standard). Scoring "too low" wouldn't be an issue for most other areas of possible qualification.

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She told me to let him not care because he was tested for special ed and scored "too low" to be admitted into the program.
That is SO not cool. So she's totally given up on him, and that's a travesty, imo. Higher tiered support in RTI or MTSS systems are supposed to be helping those kids who need support but don't meet criteria for sped.

Sounds like an ineffective system that doesn't reach as many kids as it could.
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galwaygirl172 galwaygirl172 is offline
 
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:06 AM
 
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I didn't think about it that way. Makes sense!
I get where she is coming from because that class was super rowdy and some of them can't even read (in English). Dealing with that on top of this little boy who was given up on so early in the year...
However, I don't think it's fair to him at all. She could at least push to get an assistant or something.
I'm starting to wonder about some of these schools in my district though. I see too many kids struggling when they shouldn't be.
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SADly
Old 05-13-2016, 06:17 PM
 
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It is sad if the teacher has given up, I agree. However, in many districts, a teacher can't "push" for anything. It can take an act of God to get an extra assistant. Currently we use educational funds for testing so we can know kids are failing instead of services so they don't fail.
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Old 05-14-2016, 06:13 PM
 
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Totally wrong of the teacher to say that, but it takes an act of God to get a para and a kid only gets one with an IEP. By testing too low to qualify they're setting him up to fail. The district is failing him and the teacher knows she can't do anything. The parents would have to fight it (and my district counts on parents not knowing their rights).


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Old 05-20-2016, 06:50 PM
 
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Most general ed teachers are very well-meaning, and it could be possible that the way she worded her response is not reflective of her actual attitude towards this student. I know I've said things before that have sounded wrong and had no intention of being offensive She may be frustrated that this child is being denied access to services he needs/the fact that she cannot provide him with the services herself.

The thing I find SO appalling is that your district is declaring this child "too low" for SPED! What?! How is this not a violation of FAPE? This is what SPED is for...to serve those children who have exceptional needs. Urgh!
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