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IEP Goals for borderline Profound ID
Old 11-16-2018, 05:24 PM
 
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I have a 10 year old boy that is borderline Profound ID. What are some realistic and useful academic goals for this child? Seems senseless to teach him to recognize numbers or count or even learn letters and their sounds. I suppose color recognition, names of objects, and core words vocab. and skills in using a picture communication board, some community symbols. Any other ideas?


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goals for ID
Old 11-16-2018, 05:55 PM
 
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Do you know where he's functioning cognitively? If so, you can look at what the milestones would be for that age. For example, if he's mentally 2 years, 6 months, see what would be expected of a child that age. Hope that helps!
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Well, that all depends
Old 11-16-2018, 06:33 PM
 
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if he is 10, he's already had a handful of previous IEPs, what are his strengths and weaknesses, what has he worked on previously, where do the other team members want to see him go.

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I suppose color recognition, names of objects, and core words vocab. and skills in using a picture communication board, some community symbols.
Those are all good places to try. Anything that will improve his quality of life will help. What is he interested in?

Reading goals can include the picture communication and community/safety symbols you mentioned. It can also include things that would increase his receptive language skills like the vocab work. I always try to include things that increase his stamina to task like attending to reading, staying on task, following directions, etc.

Math goals can include many things besides counting. He can match things or sort things. Start with practical things like socks, gloves, etc. Match a fork to a spoon, a shoe to a sock~things that pertain to real life.

All of his life skills are academic too at this point. Brushing his teeth with the toothpaste on the brush, combing his hair and putting away the comb after, unpacking his backpack, hanging up his coat and so on.

Don't teach him counting just for counting's sake. Have him set a mock table with paper plates and plastic silverware from the convenience store. Teach him to count to 2, 4, 6 with the hopes of 1:1 correspondence. Even if he never learns to count, it will reinforce setting the table.

Even my lowest kids use the letters to match work assignments to work boxes. I label lots of things with colors and letters. I use the book boxes from Really Good Stuff to hold the work task activities used in that classroom. I labeled each with a big colorful alphabet sticker from the Dollar Tree.
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:17 PM
 
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I agree with checking out the former IEPs to see what has been done and mastered or learned to some extent and build on that. But you should always have an eye to the future. What foundational skills does this boy need in order to acquire the life skills he will need in the future? Scaffold towards those skills. Great suggestions from whatever.
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Old 11-17-2018, 05:50 AM
 
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All my students are in the severe-profound end of the cognitive spectrum. My district mandates academic and standards-based goals for reading, writing and math for all students. I think recognizing and writing once name is important.If he lacks motor skills you could use letter tiles or start with tracing and fade into letter boxes. Math concepts could include bigger/smaller or more/less or simple patterns. Basic number recognition. You could always practice these goals in matching or sorting activities, which is especially helpful for students who become disorganized. Any kind of skill or activity that builds independence is good. So if you have to write an academic goals but really want to focus on independence, you can have him do TEACCH style number and letter matching file folders.
I have had some very cognitively low students who really ended up surprising me with what they can do academically.


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