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Old 12-20-2018, 02:44 AM
 
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On Tuesday I had run an IEP meeting that did not go as well because I was miscommunicated to from administration about placement change. I did not really get reprimanded but there was another principal there who was extremely rude. I am a first year teacher and my question is, have you ever run a meeting that just didnít go well? Iím feeling pretty down about it.


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Old 12-20-2018, 05:28 PM
 
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Yes. I can't think of a single sped teacher I know that hasn't had a meeting go sideways. Please don't beat yourself up about this, especially since you weren't given all of the information you needed.

This is year 12 for me - it does get easier, so take a deep breath. But also, fair warning, there is always the potential for meetings to go in a way you don't expect. I've had parents show up with advocates/lawyers without telling me. I've had parents yell and curse at me. But also, there are great meetings where you work as a team with the parents, or you get to share amazing progress and everyone is happy. I guess what I'm trying to say is, it's always going to be a mixed bag and you just prepare as best as you can and grow a thick skin for the rest. (Also, some really good self-care routines in place for the hard meetings is probably a good idea.)

Hang in there, and try to get some good rest over break.
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Old 12-20-2018, 06:14 PM
 
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I agree with pdx; we all have good and bad meetings. As you teach for longer, you'll do so many that the few bad ones won't stick out as much .

Last year I had a situation that was pretty crazy and had my P, a P from another school, and sped director involved. Sped director and P changed the plan the morning of the meeting without bothering to tell the school psych or I, you know, the people who were actually running the meeting and working with the student. We looked like idiots in front of the parent and gen ed teacher.

I still don't know why P didn't communicate that change to us prior to the meeting- she was literally in the meeting room chatting with us for 15 minutes before the meeting started, so it's not like she didn't have time. If a situation involving all of the higher ups like that happens again you can bet I'm going to say, "Is the plan still to ________?" prior to the meeting.
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Old 12-20-2018, 08:11 PM
 
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I can’t speak from “experience” since I’m a first year sped teacher as well. But, last week...yup. I was already nervous going into the meeting because the mom said her daughter wasn’t learning anything. My principal and the gen ed teacher were both late, so there was awkward small talk between between me and the mom.

My principal called me out over her testing/placement, which threw me off even more. I didn’t do anything wrong, she just had a question. She’s not the most warm and fuzzy person, so the question came across harsh, really harsh, even the kid’s mom and gen ed teacher were taken back by it.

This is my fifth year at this school,but my first as the sped teacher. So, for the last four years I’ve been in IEP meetings with the veteran sped teacher who I replaced. Her IEP meetings flowed like fine wine, mine are more like cheap vodka.

So, no advice, just commensuration,
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:00 AM
 
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I've been in sped as a teacher for 5 years now. In our state, the ARD (iep) meeting is led by the diagnostician, which I communicate very closely with and send the google teacher input forms way ahead of time. Our diagnostician is usually the point of everyone being on the same page before we even get to the ARD meeting with the parent in it. So I never felt that I am leading the meeting by myself, I'm just doing my part of giving the update on progress and objectives and goals, introducing the proposed services and the new goals and etc..
Sometimes before the more tricky ARDs you could call the staffing meeting with administrators and diagnostician and general ed teachers present just to discuss everything before hand and get everyone on the same page.
It's absolutely important for everyone to be on the same page before the parents enter the room. If we didn't have the chance to meet for the staffing - we update each other right before the IEP meeting behind the closed doors.
I'm sorry you have to deal with the issues like that, but maybe you can be the one who brings some good routines or communication habits into your school!


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It's the district, not state
Old 02-03-2019, 12:56 PM
 
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TX does not have a law that diagnosticians run meetings. It's the district's mandate and each district does it differently in TX. Sadly, because of the shortage of diagnosticians, and the increased evaluations, teachers will most likely in the future have to take on ARDs that are not involving assessments. There simply is no way for diagnosticians to sit and be secretaries (which is what they are a lot of the time) for ARD committees. Running an ARD and taking notes does not require a Master's degree and extensive training in assessment.

While I agree everyone needs to be on the same page, diagnosticians are not mandatory to guide everyone. They are only required when assessment is being requested/adopted by the committee in order to answer questions.

And to the original poster - you will ALWAYS have rude administrators occasionally. As someone who's facilitated upwards of 4k ARDs in 15 years, my thoughts are they are most welcome to do the paperwork themselves if they think they can do better. While I've never said that, I can guarantee if they were put on the spot to manage all the pieces of an ARD on their own, they would change their tunes and appreciate all the work it takes to make an ARD go smoothly. It's easy to sit on the side of the table where you are required to just listen and jump in here and there. Sitting on the end where you are expected to have prepped correctly, take accurate notes, and also be an active participant is not easy.
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