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AccerTX AccerTX is offline
 
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ARD Facilitators - What is your average caseload?
Old 02-02-2019, 01:58 PM
 
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Just curious for those who are ARD Facilitators in Texas (or other states) - What is your average caseload?

Just trying to gather some data due to talks about implementing ARD Facilitators in my district. What is an expected load? What is too much? Are you floating based on need (i.e. you have a smaller load at one school, so you also share and support a neighboring school)? Do you have clerks for filing? Do you get a bonus? What training did you receive?

TIA!


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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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Old 02-02-2019, 03:26 PM
 
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I'm not in Texas, so may be off base. I think from reading here that an ARD is like an annual IEP meeting? Is leading the meetings a separate job in your area?

Here in CO teachers are also case managers. We also don't have diagnosticians (if I'm remembering correctly, Texas does). I currently have about 25 students on my caseload. My first year, I was the only sped teacher at the school and had almost 50. Thankfully they hired another teacher my 2nd year in. Since then the most I've had was just over 30.

In addition to of course the actual teaching responsibilities, we are responsible for:
-Completing formal academic testing for Initials and Tris as well as writing these sections of the eval report
-Completing classroom observations for Initials and Tris
-Completing a summary of the MTSS process for Initials
-Getting input from the classroom teacher to write a summary of informal academic data for Initials and Tris
-Scheduling IEP meetings and informing people that need to be there
-Completing/Sending notice of meeting documents to parents
-Leading the IEP meeting
-Writing the IEP (other service providers will complete their own information)
-Finalizing the IEP at the end of the meeting, checking it over for compliance, uploading signature pages into the online system, and filing the paper copies.

We have a regular sub that comes in and covers classroom teachers on our IEP meeting days. Any time she's not subbing, she makes reminder calls to parents about meetings and puts reminder notices in classroom teachers' boxes if they have an upcoming meeting they need to be at.

I've never received much specialized training for any of this. I did need to learn how to give the formal assessments (Woodcock Johnson etc.) when I first moved here as teachers don't do that in my home state where I went to college. It was VERY easy to learn. It's mind blowing to me that there are places (although I know it's not many- maybe 1-2 other states?) that think someone needs an entirely separate degree to give these assessments, and then they spend money on entirely separate positions for this! We don't get paid more than other teachers.

We occasionally get information throughout the year for things we need to do in IEPs. My director was on a big kick about "student led IEPs" earlier this year. I honestly learned how to write them just from reading others' IEPs.
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AccerTX AccerTX is offline
 
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Old 02-02-2019, 03:38 PM
 
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Hi!

Yes, an ARD is an IEP meeting. Other states besides TX have diagnosticians, as I have seen job postings in NC, TX, PA, and even CA.

That's quite a bit you are responsible for as a teacher regarding evaluations. In TX, teachers will not get involved unless the kid already qualifies.

Okay, so the most you have is 30 kiddos a year to plan IEP meetings for?

How much extra time do you feel the scheduling, sending invites, leading, writing IEPs and finalizing them adds to teaching duties? If you didn't have to do the evaluation piece?

Thanks!
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newbie17 newbie17 is offline
 
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Old 02-03-2019, 08:49 PM
 
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I teach elementary resource. I have 25 on my caseload and I'm allowed 25, so I'm maxed out. Not that it matters because I'll end up with more. If the district wanted my kids to actually make real progress I wouldn't have more than 15-18 kids to take care of. That would allow for small enough groups that I could really teach them the way they deserve.



I have a clerical aid that sets up all my meetings and does my mailings, but I'm responsible for everything else.


There is no bonus in my district and training is nonexistent!
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AccerTX AccerTX is offline
 
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Training is nonexistent
Old 02-04-2019, 10:47 AM
 
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I donít think it matters where you are. Training is non existent most places.

I guess what I am asking is for those who are ARD Facilitators as the only job, what is the max load the district allows. 100 kids, etc?

Having a clerk must be marvelous. I donít know what that is! Lol


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