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A general Ed teacher with limited iep determinations
Old 01-05-2019, 03:49 PM
 
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A student is tested using the Woodcock Johnson and WISC. The student scores in the dullness range due to the low processing score. The achievement test and iq comparison show standard deviations of +14, +2, -1, -1. The data from the RTI supports the need for this child to receive specialized instruction, current class work and grades as well as the inability process information that is developmentally for their age.

I have only participated in IEP meetings where the standard deviations all were negative. I was hoping someone could help me understand how the process works in this particular scenario and if the student would still qualify as SLD.


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I may be off base here but
Old 01-05-2019, 05:45 PM
 
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I thought that schools choose one model or the other. They should either go off the RTI model OR the discrepancy model, not both. I do know that schools near us were saying that even RTI referrals had to be backed up/supported by the data but I thought they were reprimanded for it.

If your school measures him by the Discrepancy Model, this student will most likely not qualify. By the DM, there needs to be a difference of two standard deviations.

But I am not a Diagnostician or Statistician so I could be wrong.
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:51 PM
 
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Quote:
I thought that schools choose one model or the other. They should either go off the RTI model OR the discrepancy model, not both. I do know that schools near us were saying that even RTI referrals had to be backed up/supported by the data but I thought they were reprimanded for it.
We don't do the old IQ comparison thing, but in my state, the two main conditions that must be met for the student to qualify for SLD is lack of response to research based interventions AND standardized assessments showing the student is performing significantly below peers. My state defines this as the 12th percentile or lower. So it's possible for RtI data to show poor growth but for the student to still not qualify.

I honestly have no idea about the numbers the OP is positing. Discrepancy model was gone before I started teaching, so I only know about it in the sense of hearing, "Here's what we used to do" in college. OP, are you sure this is the model being used in your state? Is it possible these numbers are shared during meetings but not what eligibility is based on? Why don't you just ask your sped team?
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:25 PM
 
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I'm really confused by your post and I can't really answer your question because of it. There is no standard deviation of +14. You get to +/- 3 and you've covered well over 99% of the population. Do you mean that the achievement test in one area was 14 pt higher than the cognitive score? And what is the "dullness" range? A low score because of the processing speed bringing it down? Standard deviation is how far someone scores from the mean/average. I'm wondering if you mean point discrepancy instead.

Whether the child would qualify as SLD would really depend on what method your school requires to determine eligibility for SDI under SLD. If your school uses RTI only, then eligibility should be determined by RTI data. If they use the discrepancy model, then it's unlikely they would qualify since I'm interpreting your score data to mean that the student scored higher on the achievement testing than the cognitive testing. If the processing speed was the only low thing on the cognitive, then a different cognitive score can be considered instead. If it's the WISC, the team can use the general ability index (GAI) instead of the FSIQ. GAI doesn't include working memory or processing speed. If your school uses processing strengths and weaknesses (PSW), then there is a whole lot of data missing to be able to make that call. And there are schools who use a combination of ways to determine eligibility under SLD (or can use one or the other).

Really, though, the decision to make a child eligible for special ed is legally up to the team as a whole. So no one can tell you what your team will determine.

I might have some other thoughts if you can clarify the testing data.
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