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checkerjane checkerjane is offline
 
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Violent Student - How much???
Old 01-11-2019, 06:17 PM
 
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So, as a new sped teacher, Iím wondering how much we are expected to endure? I have a 5 year-old nonverbal autistic student. So far, Iíve been head-butted, bit, hit, and kicked. Itís a daily occurrence, and heís like this at home. He was like this last year, and itís a huge reason why the sped teacher before me retired. Admin tells me itís part of the job, and his parents donít care because they deal with it at home. To them, itís no big deal.


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Old 01-11-2019, 07:05 PM
 
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Depends on the admin, IMO. Even with a good admin, you are definitely going to be expected to put up with more than a gen ed teacher. We did sign up for this as part of the job. However, there is definitely a limit, IMO. I'm a mild/moderate teacher. I did not sign up to teach severe emotional/behavioral needs.

My previous P was not at all supportive in regards to this issue. She did support me in most other ways, but she was of firm belief that it was part of the job. She didn't believe in sending kids to more restrictive placements and even went as far as to compare that to "throwing kids away." One year with a particularly rough student, my entire team was called into her office and given a 2 hour lecture about how we didn't care about the student, weren't motivated to help him, etc. etc.

My current P is more supportive with this particular issue and sees that it's unrealistic for me to spend all of my time with one kid. She's the only admin I've ever had who legitimately cared about the IEP minutes being met (previous P expected me to drop everything to deal with high needs students). She's also said that she has to protect the safety of the staff and she doesn't tolerate kids being violent with teachers. I had a very violent kid earlier in the year. P threw a GIANT fit at the district level to get him moved very quickly.

On the other hand, this P isn't very supportive of me in regards to academics. Can't have it all, I guess!
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Old 01-12-2019, 05:14 AM
 
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Does your school have a behavioral interventionist? They usually can provide guidance. I know some districts have them and some donít. Is there anything listed in his IEP that you can use to redirect his behavior?
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Violent kid
Old 01-12-2019, 06:23 AM
 
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I'm not sure of your type of class, but, no, this is not acceptable.

Like Hayley said, it is one thing if you are in a behavioral class or day treatment program. And special ed in general the bad days and bad kids are typically more extreme.

But if the kid was like this last year, obviously the setting and interventions provided are not working. He should have had a functional behavioral analysis, a behavior intervention plan and possibly a 1:1 aid.

If I were you I would start asking how to get things in place if they are not or what are the next steps as they are obviously not working.

If your principal pushes back, just know that these steps are also part of special ed.

Do you have a special ed director that can help get things in place?

And as far as the parents, they will have to deal with his behavior as a 13-year old and a 45-year old. They will regret not dealing with it now when he is small.
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:03 AM
 
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Thanks for the replies, I greatly appreciate the info. He does have a 1:1 aide, and he does the same thing to her. Itís her first year with him. I donít think sheíll be back next year, which breaks my heart because sheís amazing.

I kind of get frustrated because I feel like I just get everything. Iíve got kids who are SLD and come in once a week to read to me, kids who come everyday for 30 minutes, kids who need sensory breaks because theyíre about to/already have had a violent meltdown, and then this kiddo. Itíd be nice to have one area to focus on: SLD issues or behavior issues. Sped Eutopeia, right? Lol.


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Sped classes
Old 01-12-2019, 10:52 AM
 
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I totally get you about being dumped on.

I had a job like that as a newish special ed teacher too.

It does get better, but for me it took a lot of trial and error.

The biggest change was moving from a small, rural district to a larger, "urban" district.

There are more resources and larger numbers of special ed students. So more classes and resources geared toward students like yours.

It is not perfect, but it is better.

Also, I have more opportunities to move within the district if where I was at was not working.
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:37 PM
 
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My resource room is a smorgasbord some years--LD students, low cognitive but sweet students, behavior students, and lots of students on the autism spectrum. What I'm noticing is that it is getting more difficult to fast track highly aggressive students to behavior programs where they can get the support they need. Instead they first need to get SDI in the Resource Room because it is considered the least restrictive.

Last year I had a student that never quite met the 'threshold" but kinda terrorized his classroom all year long! We have two this year that also fit that category. In the meantime our LD students often take the back seat as we handle extreme behaviors. My district is bursting at the seams with volatile students. Seven years ago when I was a behavior teacher we had four elementary behavior programs--we now have nine and need more! One of the many reasons I'm ready to retire!
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Old 01-12-2019, 06:58 PM
 
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I work in the most restrictive type of setting and all of my students come to me because of significant long term aggressive behaviors. I used to work in resource room and used to think of places like mine as the place where magic could make aggressive students stop doing what they are doing. But really there is no magic. I am not 1:1 staffed. I have more resources for dealing with aggressive behaviors like blockers, padded areas, behavior specialist, CPI training, but none of them in themselves turn a student around. I get hit, bitten, kicked, threatened, scratched, spit at every day. The behaviors most often do get better, but it is lot of hard work. A lot of detective work in finding out what the function of the behavior is, and finding ways to teach the kids to function in more socially appropriate ways. It is easy to feel scared and frustrated and want to blame someone: bad kid, bad parent, bad administrator. But I don't think that is fair either because it is not true. It's just hard. For everyone involved.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:50 AM
 
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There's simply no reason whatsoever to go to a job where you are physically and/or emotionally abused every single day . Press charges and force the district to find appropriate services for these students or quit your job. Don't enable the district by degrading yourself into being the punching bag. That alone is not in your best interest or the students' best interest. And yes it is perfectly appropriate to protect your well being.
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Old 01-13-2019, 10:15 AM
 
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Yes Anna....the more you take without speaking up....the more the district will expect you to take....don't stay quiet...speak up...


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Violent student
Old 01-13-2019, 05:48 PM
 
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You might check with your sped director and/or HR, but in my district, if a student makes physical contact with any other person and leaves a mark, we have to document it and file it with HR, admin, and Civil Liberties Union. The district also pays for those that have damage to be seen by a doctor. Because of this, I think our district and admin are more likely to be involved to help protect the child, other students in the room, and the staff as much as possible because it costs money every time it happens.

One of our nonverbal high school students bit a teacher so hard that he broke skin and she has a permanent scar on her arm. She was given restitution for that. With that being said, I would make sure to document every little issue you have, (write down the incident, take photos of anyone harmed) ask for the FBA if there isn't one, and get with the powers that be to make sure the room is safe for everyone.
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Old 01-14-2019, 03:38 PM
 
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Thanks again for all the replies and advice! I appreciate them all. I decided to join a union. Iím really concerned of something did happen when I was injured, the district wouldnít do anything about it.
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Old 01-26-2019, 02:49 PM
 
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I'm having the same problem, but I'm dealing with high school students. I'm working in a confined classroom and we have four students total. Two of them have severe behavior issues and one is worse than the other. We've been having serious issues with one of them and it has involved everything from scratching staff and students, biting, tearing the hair out of staff members, destroying equipment (several iPads and a computer to date), urinating on himself and the floor, trying to make himself throw up, tearing/shredding his clothes, biting himself, constantly putting his hands in his pants and digging into his rectum (and then immediately trying to touch us), licking surfaces, biting objects - the list goes on and on (we even had to call the police once).

His parents have given up as he does the same thing at home (has destroyed furniture, windows, and he even jumped off of the top of the house) and they either don't know what to do or are unwilling to do anything (he's on medication, but it obviously doesn't work). All of this is due to the student's mental health issues and are not the result of abuse, neglect, etc. - it's all tied to an extremely low functioning non-verbal individual.

The result is that nobody wants to work in the classroom and our other three students are neglected since we spend almost all of our time dealing with this one student. Admin seems unwilling to do anything since everyone is scared to death of the parents and everyone is constantly invoking the IDEA.

There has to come a point where a child/student who is obviously a danger to themselves and/or to others can be removed from the classroom and taken home for a mandatory cool off period. If my kids so much as sneeze at school I am expected to come and get them and take them home for 24 hours. Yet all of this nonsense is going on and we're simply expected to put up with it because it's "part of the job"? At what point does the welfare of the school staff and other students become more important than accommodating a single student's issues? I'm trying to get our staff behavior specialist involved, but of course when they show up, none of the behavior manifests itself. I'm at a loss and there is no way I will be working with these types of students next year.
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Old 01-26-2019, 07:28 PM
 
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Wow...just wow. Iím so sorry youíre going through that.
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Document everything!
Old 02-09-2019, 12:28 PM
 
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You should not be bit, hit, and kicked. Do you have a mentor? As a new teacher you definitely need someone who knows building procedures. You need to fill out an incident report everytime you are injured. A bite is an injury. You should have been seen for that. Even if you just have a bruise or think you might develop one you need to complete the paperwork for that. If you are just telling your principal these things are happening and there is no paperwork he's going to do the easiest thing and ignore you. When there is a paper trail it's amazing how much better things will get.

You are part of the team for this child so if things are not going well you have a right to request an IEP meeting to develop another plan. Bring specific data about when and how often you and the aid have been bit, kicked, hit, or head butted.

Joining a union and talking to the rep is a good idea. This is not appropriate working conditions.
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