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How to teach a "mute" to read?

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Reese07
 
 
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How to teach a "mute" to read?
Old 09-01-2008, 02:54 PM
 
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This is my 5th year as a Resource teacher and I've gotten in a student that has a degenerative brainstem disorder of some sort. It presents like Cerebral Palsy, but I've been told it is not CP.

He is in 1st grade and cannot voice words due to lack of muscle control, although he does try very hard. So he really is not mute, but he can't vocalize either.

My question is ... what are some strategies I should use when teaching him to read? I have always taught reading where the kids can orally sound out the words, and this won't work with him. Any suggestions?


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Old 09-01-2008, 04:47 PM
 
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use many of the strategies that you normally use--just have him point to words so that you know what he knows. Does he have a pecs system or an assitive device of any kind--he sounds like he could use one--ask you speech dept. I have worked with many selective mute children and a few who could not speak on their own--once you get familiar with the child you will be surprised the ways that you will both communicate!
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Old 09-01-2008, 07:35 PM
 
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You could use the Systematic Phonics Approach. The student makes a word using a phonetic approach with a set of 5 to 8 letters that you supply. I use this a lot with my kids and it is very effective for teaching phonics, and it doesn't take vocalization just moving the letter cards or the word cards.
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Old 09-14-2008, 10:42 AM
 
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I have come to love an internet based reading program called Click N Read. Your student learns phonics by listening to verbal prompts and clicks a button on the keyboard for responses. Check it out on the web. Good luck!
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:30 PM
 
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I am curious how you proceeded with this child. we recently adopted a child with CP, smart boy but similarly, unable to verbalize due to CP. Did you find good recources to use for the child in your class? He is kindergarten age.


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Sherryl Lynn
 
 
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Old 08-26-2016, 04:55 PM
 
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I use Signing Exact English (SEE) with my student with CP, but also encourage approximate vocalization of words. It is important to use SEE because ASL is kind of like pigeon English because it uses the same sign for several words, and leaves out smaller words like the, a, etc. which are critical to reading.

I compiled a progressive list of sight word books starting with the word "I" then adding one new sight word with each subsequent book. The only other words in the books are picture words, so the student does not come across any words he is not fluent with.

We start our session with practicing letter sounds and writing letters using a workbook with a scrap of laminate on top and a dry erase marker. This serves three purposes: 1. The student can write more fluidly with the dry erase marker, and his errors can easily be erased 2. the waste laminate is put to good use : ) 3. the workbook can be reused.

Next, we review previously learned words by laying out review words and asking him to identify a word, if he can do this already, then I ask him to read the word using sign language. Then, I introduce the new word, and we read it together, pointing to each letter and sounding it out slowly, then sliding the finger along the word and blending the sounds to make the word.

Then, we build the word using foam letters. Then he writes the word using a dry erase marker. We use the Really Good Stuff Make a Word Center, which has separate boxes for the letters which I sorted and labeled in ABC order, so he is learning that also as he looks for the letters to build the word with.

Then, I introduce the sign for the word. He watches me and sometimes a video from the SEE app ($10 I have not been able to find any free SEE apps) if I cannot sign it well enough (I have "unique" pinkies). Then, signing each word and pointing to it, I read out loud the book with the new sight word in it and review words, nothing other than these and picture words. Then he reads the book by signing it as I say the words he is signing out loud. He has read several books to his regular ed class this way, and they are amazed with his talent.

The struggle is real...I hope this helps! My student really took off with this method.
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