Place Value Clues - ProTeacher Community


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Place Value Clues
Old 09-03-2008, 05:45 AM
 
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Does anyone know where I can find place value clues online like this?

The hundreds digit is 6.
The ones and tens digits are the same.
The ones digit plus the tens digit equals the hundreds digit.

I know one of Kim Sutton's books has a lot of these in there, which is on my list of "Books to Buy.'' But I wondering if there were any online somewhere for free.

Thanks!


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Old 09-03-2008, 10:31 AM
 
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Here are some that I have used with my fourth graders. I've had them so long I don't remember where I got them:

1. The number in the ten thousands place is a 4.
The number in the thousands place is half the number in the ten thousands place.
The number in the hundred thousands place is twice the number in the ten thousands place.
The number in the ones place is a 6.
The number in the tens place is one less than the number in the ones place.
The number in the hundreds place is one more than the number in the ones place.
What number am I?

2. In a three digit number, the least place value digit is 7. The greatest place value digit is 9. The middle place value digit is two more than the least place value digit. What number am I?

3. I am a four digit number. The two greatest place value digits are 2. The sum of the ones and tens digits is 14. The tens digit is a 9. What number am I?

4. There is a four in the ones place.
Each digit in the ones period is one digit less than the number to its right.
Each digit in the thousands period is an eight.
The digit in the millions period is two times the number in the ones place.
What number am I?

5. In a four digit number, the tens and hundreds digits are 4. The ones digit is twice the tens. The thousands digit is the sum of the tens and the hundreds.
What number am I?

6. In a four digit number, the number in the tens place is a four. The number in the ones place is two times the number in the tens.
The number in the hundreds place is three digits less than the number in the ones place. The number in the thousands place is two digits more than the number in the hundreds place.
What number am I?

7. The digit in the ones place is a 3.
All the digits in the thousands period are three times the digit in the ones period.
The digits in the tens and hundreds places are one less than the digits in the thousands period.
What number am I?

8. Each digit in the thousands period is two times the digit in the hundreds place.
The digit in the hundreds place is two times the digit in the ones place.
The digit in the ones place is three less than the digit in the tens place.
The digit in the tens place is a 5.
What number am I?

9. Each digit in the ones period is 0.
Each digit in the thousands period is 3.
The digit in the millions place is twice the digit in the thousands place. What number am I?

10. In a three digit number, the tens digit is four times the hundreds digit. The hundreds digit is NOT 1. The ones digit is a 5. What number am I?
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westwood westwood is offline
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Love the idea
Old 09-03-2008, 04:15 PM
 
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Thanks for making these available. They're great and the students will love them--won't know they're practicing place value. :-)
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Mystery Numbers
Old 09-06-2008, 02:18 PM
 
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These are all great mystery number game ideas. Once you begin these, you will find yourself thinking of all kinds of Mystery Number problems. It's always good to have a bank of problems on hand.

I did this with a Math Academy, which paired second graders with fourth graders. We solved many mystery number problems together, then even went back and reviewed several to see if we could solve them in less time. We always included lots of "Number Talk" and asked for explanations of math thinking. Then, the children were challenged to write their own mystery number problems. WOW! Those kiddos got their math thinkers ticking and wrote outstanding problems, which were used to add to our bank of problems. Try it----------:>)!
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