difference between shared reading/read aloud - ProTeacher Community


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difference between shared reading/read aloud
Old 10-09-2008, 03:21 PM
 
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i tried to get a good answer to this question at school, but i need more answers.

what is the difference between shared reading and read aloud? i was told that read aloud is just for enjoyment with no thinking out loud/reading strategy skill, etc. is this correct? i need to make sure i have everything included in my plans.


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Old 10-09-2008, 03:23 PM
 
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I thought read aloud was where one reader had the book (you), shared reading was where everyone has the text. They can see what you are reading.
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Old 10-09-2008, 03:29 PM
 
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Read alouds are by the teacher (single reader) and should include think alouds, comprehension questions, etc.

Shared reading is when the whole group reads the text together. It is used to improve fluency and expression. Also discuss text features, comprehension questions, and other reading strategies.
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Balanced literacy approach
Old 10-09-2008, 03:36 PM
 
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Shared Reading - students (and teacher) read out loud in unison from one text that is large enough for all to see well.

In my 1st grade class, we read Chart Poems every day for Shared Reading. Also written on the large chart paper and included with the poems were: the building pledge, counting to ten in 3 languages, a very long piece that we literally read all year, classroom rules (only 4, simply stated).

The 1st couple of days when some of the poems were new while some of the older poems were still on the chart stand, we read for meaning and understanding. We took a couple of days in the middle of the week to do word work from the poems. This a very rich place to get this in. The last day or so, we worked on phrasing and fluency. I loved doing Shared Reading with my kids.

Read Aloud - The teacher reading to the students from one regular sized book.

The purposes of a read aloud can be many! The book may be nonfiction, and you are reading for information, and using self-talk to show the children this aspect of books.

You may show comprehension strategies by thinking aloud. You could choose to show decoding strategies by thinking aloud. Conversations about the artwork are always fun and educational. Would you like to compare and contrast authors' voice and so forth? Then read aloud.

Working on students understanding story structure? Read aloud. Maybe your students are working on setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end. Then read aloud.

Want to introduce geometry to your students? Read aloud. Let's see, fire safety week has passed (I think)...did you read aloud to include the social studies component of this event? And, of course, Columbus Day is coming up. Do you want students to understand the timeline of this event? Read aloud.

It is also appropriate to read aloud just for enjoyment.

Perhaps this is the greatest lesson of all for a read aloud
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Old 10-09-2008, 03:45 PM
 
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Shared reading-teacher & students choral read from the same text (usually a big book)

Read aloud-one person reads to others- (usually the teacher is the reader)

In my Kindergarten class, I emphasize reading strategies, comprehension skills in both shared & read alouds.


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Old 10-09-2008, 03:49 PM
 
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i teach 5th. i forgot to mention that. generally 5th don't do the choral do they?
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Old 10-09-2008, 04:04 PM
 
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5th graders can choral read! They probably won't do it as often as a primary class but why not?
It really helps lower readers or those afraid to read out loud in front of others. I used choral reading with a 7th grade class and they didn't mind.
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Difference
Old 10-09-2008, 04:47 PM
 
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Shared Reading is your grade level reading in which students share in the reading experience. The teacher chooses 1 - 2 teaching strategies.

Read Aloud is above grade level reading done by the teacher. Again the teacher should choose 1 -2 teaching points.

Let's not forget Guided Reading which is the student's level of reading.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:26 PM
 
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thanks for all the help. i do have guided reading covered and i've done a ton of reading up on it and it seems to be going very well so far. i was just confused about the difference between shared and read aloud.
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agree
Old 10-09-2008, 05:30 PM
 
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I agree with above posters... also -- for the most part (but not always) interactive read alouds are a good place to work on deep structures (invisible- comprehension) and shared reading works on surface structures (visible- word strategies, fluency).

BTW: Of course read alouds can be for fun! I try to separate mine out. So I never skip the interactive read aloud where I teach my comprehension strategies. But most days I have what I call my "bedtime read aloud". I don't call it that to the kids, but in my mind, that's how I think of it. I don't ask any questions or push the discussion more than I would if I were snuggling up to read a child a bedtime story.
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Don't want to confuse the issue
Old 10-09-2008, 06:25 PM
 
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But since you're working w/5th, Readers Theatre would be a swell way to go w/the older kids.

I've seen several posts on PT about it.

Is your school asking everyone to implement these philosophies or is this something that you are doing on your own?

Two words for ya -- Regie Routman. Great author. I've even attended a workshop she gave. I have all her books. Readable, knowledgeable on balanced literacy.

Fountas and Pinnell are also good sources for books to help learn more.
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Old 10-09-2008, 07:18 PM
 
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Like Bookmuncher I agree (for the most part) with the previous posts. I disagree with the person who told you that "read aloud is just for enjoyment with no thinking out loud/reading strategy skill, etc.".

Read alouds, shared reading, guided reading and independent reading are all part of the gradual release of responsibily model.
IMHO, read alouds are indeed the time the teacher models the strategies a good reader uses. This is a time for think alouds etc. Not to kill the story but certainly to model for the students.
During shared reading all students have access to the text. The selection is revisited several times with a different purpose each time -- word, sentence, text levels. It is also a time to help students make connections that help them understand the story. Repeated readings develop fluency, vocabulary, confidence etc. Shared reading may look a bit different at each grade level (eg. Kindergarten may circle letters or sounds, grade 1 may circle sight words while grade 3 maybe circling parts of speech. Many use poems but shared reading is also a time to help students learn about different genres, conventions of non-fiction etc.

Try this link if you want more info

http://www.eworkshop.on.ca/edu/core.cfm
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Old 10-10-2008, 04:25 PM
 
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shared reading -- everyone has a copy of the text

interactive read aloud - teacher has the text. model strategies with thinkalouds and students practice strategies.

read aloud -- I have a read aloud that I do just for enjoyment. I'm still modeling fluency and making connections when I read, but mostly it's just for enjoyment. (usually there is a curricular tie-in as well.)
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Old 10-10-2008, 04:36 PM
 
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is there a reason why a read aloud should just be the teacher reading a book without the children having their own copy?

the reason why i ask is because i teach 5th and often do novels as read alouds, but i make sure they all have a copy. we are reading for enjoyment and we stop to talk about the book, but it isn't the book i use for mini lessons, etc. i was told that it wasn't a read aloud because they all had a copy. i know my kids well, and if they have nothing in front of them, they aren't paying a lick of attention.

is there a benefit to the teacher reading a book WITHOUT the kids having their own copy?
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Old 10-10-2008, 05:59 PM
 
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Mrs. Croak-

If the students have a copy of the novel, that is shared reading. You are working on more structural aspects of reading and is usually on grade level. A read aloud is a book that students may not be able to read independently yet- usually a grade level or even two above-helps them fall in love with reading by introducing them to a variety of stories and allows them to hear fluency modeled as well as some new vocabulary words. When you do a read aloud, (not an interactive) you just read. You don't stop ever few lines or paragraphs to pepper the students with questions- you just let them sit back and enjoy. Many of my students enjoy the read alouds so much, that they will seek out books by the same author or read stories similar to the one I am reading.
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Old 10-11-2008, 07:08 AM
 
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This is just my opinion, and I don't know your class (or 5th grade) well enough to know if it's right...

I think that because read aloud is for children to work on the deep structures of comprehension, it could be helpful for kids to have some read aloud time without the text between them and the words. That sounds funny-- usually the text is the vehicle to ideas. But it's not when a child struggles somewhat with fluency or decoding. Then the text can be somewhat of a barrier.

The beauty of a listening only read aloud, is that they are forced (with your modeling and guidance) to enter the story-- forgetting about the words for a time-- through taught strategies, such as making mental images or connecting to their own lives.

Children who don't listen well to read alouds probably haven't been read aloud to often. (Obviously not your fault) So, they have to be taught. They will listen if it is a story that they can't help but be sucked into. Without all of them having to have a copy, you've just opened youself up to a world of choices in the area of read aloud. I would start with a book that doesn't have complicated text structure. Don't get pick a book only because the story is fabulous-- try reading it aloud at home a little. If it's too meandering and complex in its syntax, then maybe save it for when they are more sophisticated listeners.

All of that being said, if you are using that read aloud time NOT as your comprehension instruction and NOT as a discussion of meaning, but as time to think about text structure and phrasing and words, then maybe them having the text is OK. That's what shared reading is, after all.
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Old 10-11-2008, 10:03 AM
 
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Again, the read aloud is the first step in the gradual release of responsibility. Teacher modeling, oral predicting, inferring, visualizing, think alouds etc This is also a time to talk about your thinking while you are reading (metacognition). For the most part read alouds should be purposefully selected, not just a book grabbed from the shelf.

If the kids have a copy of the text it becomes shared reading. The second step of the gradual release of repsonsibility.

If giving each student a copy of the text is more a management tool than an instructional device perhaps there is something else the kids could do during read aloud. Maybe have sticky notes and write down a new word, question they might have, visualize the story, make one prediction about what will happen next, journasl entry after the read aloud etc.
It involves a whole other skill set to follow along while the teacher reads. Some will/can and some will be totally lost.
Just my humble opinion.

Your original post indicated you needed to include "everything" in your plans. In my district you would be required to show all the components of a balanced literacy programme within your literacy block. You would need to indicate specific times for read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, independent reading. Our timetables are handed back to us if these are not clearly indicated each and every day. : )

The really important thing is that you are reading wonderful literature.
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