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Allergic
Old 08-13-2006, 12:21 PM
 
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Has anyone ever had a child in their class with a food allergy? I just found out that I have a little girl who is allllergic to anything with milk in it. I am new to 2nd grade and I am sure we will celebrate birthdays. How can I include the little girl, if a parent brings cupcakes or something I would hate to have her feel left out. Thanks for any advice.


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Food Allergies
Old 08-13-2006, 12:28 PM
 
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I've had a couple of kids with milk allergies. The moms sent snacks that their kids could have to be used when we had a birthday party. Then the rest of the kids could have the treats that the birthday child brought, and the one with milk allergies could choose something from his box. I had to work closely with the school nurse on anything that the child ate-everything was cleared through her and documented. The milk allergies aren't nearly as bad as peanut allergies. Peanut allergies tend to have more severe consequences. Just don't let the child eat anything until it's cleared through the nurse or the mom.
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Old 08-13-2006, 01:06 PM
 
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linda's right - peanut allergies are much worse. I have lactose intolerance (somewhat related to milk allergy) and while it does upset my sytem, it is not life threatening. That being said, have extra snacks (like pretzels, skittles, etc. - or whatever is on child's approved list) for special occasions in case she forgets to bring one in. Also make sure to have a talk with the class at the beginning of the year about the importance of not sharing food at lunch. Most kids with allergies are very aware of what they can and cannot eat, but I'm sure some will try to eat things they're not supposed to. Just keep an eye on things!
Also make sure to bring medicine and extra snacks on field trips.
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alleriges
Old 08-13-2006, 03:25 PM
 
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Since my son has several food allergies, I will send in snacks for him to have if there is doubt what is in a product.
My best advice is to real all lables, you never know what may be in a product.
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Popsicles
Old 08-13-2006, 04:29 PM
 
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As mentioned above, most of our students with food allergies have an extra stash of special snacks. However, we also encourage parents of birthday students to send in popsicles for the birthday snack. Most don't contain milk or peanuts. Our nurse always checks the ingredients anyway, but I've never had a child who couldn't have one. Our nurse writes a note to parents at the start of the year asking them to keep food allergies in mind when making class snacks and planning class parties. They are welcome to check with her if they have any questions.


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Allergies
Old 08-13-2006, 08:39 PM
 
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I will have a student this year who has severe allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, and soy products among other things. She also has very bad asthma. Although the school nurse and last year's teacher filled me in on how to accommodate for the child, I have to admit I am a bit spooked about the possibility that someone will inadvertently bring something into the room that will be problematic for the student.
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Food Allergies
Old 08-14-2006, 07:16 PM
 
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Just don't allow the child to eat anything unless it's cleared by the school nurse first, at least until you feel like you aren't spooked by it anymore. I was overwhelmed by the allergies of the child I had too, but I just made sure that everything went through the nurse.That's her job. That's why she's there. At first I thought she would get tired of me asking, but actually, she wanted to know for sure what he was eating too.
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Peanut allergies
Old 08-14-2006, 07:38 PM
 
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I am the one with peanut allergy in my class. One thing that you need to remember is to have the students that have had peanuts/peanut butter at lunch to wash their hands. If a child has eaten a pb&j sandwich at lunch he may still have some peanut butter on his hands. If he touches something in the classroom and the allergic person touches it, that person can have an allergic reactioin. One of my students left a napkin on a table, I picked it up and then opened my soda. I hadn't realized that the little boy had gotten peanut butter on the napkin. I transfered it to my bottle and I had a reaction. The students learn to go wash their hands if they have anything with peanut butter. A lot of people watch what the allergic person ingests but they don't think about how things can be transferred.
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Allergies
Old 08-15-2006, 03:19 PM
 
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Peanut butter and peanut products are banned at our school. The children are not allowed to have peanut butter sandwiches at school or anything that contains nuts or peanuts. Most parents abide by these rules but there are a few who still try and send in something that is not allowed. I had a child with severe milk allergies, my collegue and I only allowed the food items that the student was able to eat. The parents of the other students were great about this. In our beginning of the year letter we had a list of things that parents could send in during special days. I also kept a box of items this child was allowed to eat in the classroom. Good Luck.
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Allergies
Old 08-15-2006, 06:08 PM
 
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You won't believe this, but there was actually a child in our school that was so allergic to peanuts that he had a reaction from just smelling peanut butter in the cafeteria. The school had served peanut butter sandwiches so the smell was strong. They no longer serve peanut butter sandwiches. This happened before I came to the district 13 years ago, but they still talk about it.


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Old 08-18-2006, 09:20 AM
 
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I would contact the parents and speak to the first grade teacher. Both of my daughters are allergic to dairy and soy. I always send "safe" food for my oldest. Milk allergies can be life threatening...find out how the child reacts. Good luck.
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Old 08-18-2006, 03:56 PM
 
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I'm a teacher with severe allergies and asthma. I believe it when a child has a bad reaction to just smelling the food. I'm that way with strawberries. Its very hard in my school to avoid them. They've put me on lunch duty (rotating when our lunch person left). When there's early dismissal, kids bring their lunch to the room. I don't allow strawberries in there. They even have strawberry milk, jello etc. in the school lunches. My team and principal don't tell others to exclude strawberries for baby showers, staff luncheons etc. So I can never go to them. I feel really left out so I know how these kids feel. But the staff is told to make sure of any kid allergies. Mine is serious too. I'm on two different allergy meds., two inhalers and 2 nasals sprays. First I'll lose my voice or part of it. This is because my vocal cords are constricting. Then I'll get hives. Those are terrible. Then I'll get a migraine, stuffed nose really bad. I've had allergies shots before-didn't help.
I think schools should all ban peanut products and also anything scented. Some work places have this policy. Why should us allergy suffers be subjected to it while we are trying to work or learn in a small enclosed room for over 7 hours?

Last edited by Tounces; 08-18-2006 at 04:06 PM..
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