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Ideas on talkative kiddos
Old 08-19-2006, 06:30 AM
 
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I have a fourth grade class who loves to talk! We have been in school for one week, have gone over and over the appropriate and innappropriate times to talk, and they don't seem to get it! They talk in line at the bathroom, while walking in the halls, when taking tests, even when the principal is in the room!!!

What do I do next?? I gave them a couple of days without any consequences when they talked at an innappropriate time, and then I started having them stand on the fence for 5 minutes at recess. That didn't work because they kept talking! Also, my principal informed me that we shouldn't have kids standing on the fence anymore, which is fine with me, because I don't really like doing that, but what other choice do I have? I need to give them some consequence for talking!

We do have recess detentions, where they have a form to be signed by their parents if they serve one, but to me, that is too harsh for talking once, right?

I don't know what to do and I need suggestions. What consequence do I give them when they talk?

Thanks!


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Old 08-19-2006, 06:38 AM
 
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I taught 4th last year, and those kids talked SO MUCH. We went over and over the expectations, but they were so chatty! They seemed to think that no talking meant to whisper.

At my school, we have a school-wide discipline plan that I followed. It's similar to pulling a card. After so many are pulled, then the student gets detention.

I try to include rewards as well. Students who never pull a card receive a ticket for the day. At the end of the week they can exchange tickets for prizes.

The main thing is to be consistent. It's hard, but whenever you see someone talking, you have to follow through with whatever discipline plan you have. I'm still working on that part!
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Old 08-19-2006, 06:44 AM
 
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SC...

Thanks for replying so fast! Could you explain about pulling cards?

I have a discipline plan that I never needed to implement last year because I had no behavior problems, but it was basically signing their name under the rule that was broken. Good documentation, but I never knew how to use it pertaining to consequences.

Thanks!
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I just wanted to mention how I use tickets
Old 08-19-2006, 07:49 AM
 
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I teach music, but I do tickets with Chorus students this year, and we (me and my teammate) are giving each student 8 tickets at the beginning of the month, and if they break a rule (disrupting class=1 ticket lost, talking in class= 1 ticket lost, disrespect to a teacher or staff member =3 tickets lost, tardy to choir(without written excuse to admit to class)=3 tickets lost, and a new one we will be adding is gum in class that may be 3 tickets, (we haven't decided yet)

Also...if no gum, and no sunflower seeds is a rule in the schools, why do teachers still give these as treats???? We've encountered this problem already this year in our classes(both my teammate and myself), and it's only the first week!!!!! ARRRRRGGGHHHH!!!!

Now, for the other music classes, we are doing BRAVO, and it's pretty simple, but yet pretty effective, because ALL of the students want to be a BRAVO student....this is 4-6 grade, by the way. They get to place their BRAVO (mine is stars, my teammate uses tickets for this as well), and the student writes their name on the BRAVO wall, and then gets to pick a small prize out of my prize bucket, before they leave class.

Also, our school does "dollars"...and classes earn them by being on their best behavior, and if a staff or faculty member sees a class exhibiting OUTSTANDING behavior, and following all of the school rules, they earn a "dollar" for their class. The class with the most at the end of the 9 weeks, will be rewarded with a party of some kind. The cafeteria ladies award them, the library, music, P.E, computer classes...anyone who's a staff or faculty member. The students are already excited about this , this school year. The only no-no is...you can't give them to YOUR OWN class...they have to come from someone else who notices how outstanding your class is behaving.

Some other schools use these in the parish as well, Bethany.

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Pulling Cards
Old 08-19-2006, 09:11 AM
 
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Bethany,
To answer your question about the cards...Each student has a set of different colored cards (for example, everyone starts on green). If a student breaks a rule, he/she pulls the green card to show yellow. After breaking another rule, he/she pulls the card to show the red. If you want to give more chances, you can add more colors. Once the student reaches the final color, he/she gets detention.

I've seen a variation on this where the teacher had a yard stick divided into 4 different colored section. Student's names were written on clothespins and clipped onto the stick. Everyone's clip started the day at the top. After breaking a rule, the student's clip was moved down to the next color. If the student's clip made it to the bottom, then there's a more severe consequence (detention, call home, visit to principal, etc.).


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our time vs. your time
Old 08-19-2006, 09:40 AM
 
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One year I had the same problem with my kids. They were great kids, but as a class never stopped talking. I explained to them that sometimes it is our time to learn and at the end of the day, lunch, and recess is your time to talk. I will graciously give you fabulous fantastic fourth graders 5-10 minutes at the end of every day to talk if you can refrain from talking during our lessons. I kept a stop watch set at 10 minutes and everytime the class was disrupted or they were not quiet in the halls, I let the timer run until they stopped. The first few days they had no free time. But they quickly began to work for the time that was set aside. Eventually, my class chatting epediemic was whittled down to about 3 chatty kids. Then those few just received consequences according to our classroom behavior expectations. It may just work for you. Good luck with whatever you decide. :-)
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high five
Old 08-19-2006, 11:04 AM
 
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This is not so much a behavoir plan as class management idea that works for all grades. First you explain that each finger on the hand represents a something Thumb look forward , pointer - closed mouths,
Middle finger all hands on teacher, the rest can be what you want .
But the deal is that when you raise your hand then everyone else raises their hand and nobody says sh sh . Of course your on target kids will be the first to do it then eventually the visual clue is a chain reaction and you can then spot the ones talking in solo voices and nobody likes to be in conversation with everyone hearing them.
Just say "Give me FIVE!' our all school does this so I can walk into another classroom to calm them down by saying "Give me Five!" Trust me these or big talkers too. We use the cards too.
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Talkative Kids
Old 08-19-2006, 01:20 PM
 
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This year I am also using the Give Me five system with my third graders. I have a set a posters someone shared with me that state Give Me Five and then 1. Eyes on the speaker 2. Lipes Closed 3. Ears Listening 4. Sit Up Straight 5. Hands and Feet quiet. Basically, I hold up my hand, say give me five and wait for the class to respond by holding up their hand and meeting the 5 criteria. In our grade, we use a monetary system, so if the class does not give their attention to the teacher in an appropriate amount of time, they will be fined some of their money.

Another thing I have used is a music box. Basically, I wind up a store bought music box and throughout the day if the class is talking, I open the box and let it play until they are quiet. At the end of the day, we time the music box and if they meet a certain number of minutes/seconds the class receives a reward. (You'll need to make sure you know how long the music box plays before you use this and set a time - most boxes I've found run about 2 1/2 minutes, and I set the goal as either 1 minute or 1 1/2 minutes depending on the kids). Your rewards can be whatever you choose. The two systems for rewards that have worked best for me are money for our money system or a letter to spell a word. For the letters, you can have options that the students spell such as: no homework, extra recess, pizza party, lunch in the classroom, video time, etc. Each day the students meet the goal they earn a letter, when the whole word/phrase is spelled they get their reward. I have also done this where each time the students spell the word surprise and are then rewarded with something of my choice - I think they like to vote to choose which reward to work on better than the surprise option.

Hope some of these ideas help!
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Old 08-19-2006, 01:40 PM
 
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I use "Give Me 5!" as well as a system similar to "pulling cards". In my room, everyone has a leaf with their name on it sitting inside a library pocket (picture below has pockets without leaves). For talking or any other misbehavior, the student will take their leaf, and place it in "warning". They move their leaf to the right each time there is another infraction.

I also take away team points if a whole group is talking.
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What great ideas!
Old 08-19-2006, 05:53 PM
 
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I just want to sincerely say thank you for all the ideas you have given me. I now feel like I have some "hope" with this class. Leaving Friday afternoon, I just felt beaten down and thinking nothing will work. Now, I have some ideas that will definitely be used starting Monday.

Thanks everyone! You all are such great people (and teachers! )


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chattiness
Old 08-19-2006, 06:02 PM
 
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One of my very favorite classes was the chattiest. When I look back I chuckle to think how I would have traded that chattiness for some of the problems I had last year. However, chattiness is a problem that needs to be managed so it doesn't get too out of hand. Give me five does work to get their attention when you need it to teach. Another trick that works for me relates to me being too lenient. They start talking when I get too lenient. I too have a card system so I pull out my clipboard with list of student names when they get too chatty. In the hall, when they walk in first thing and before we get started seems to be their chattiest time. When they see clipboard in hand they know I mean business. Their names are right in front of me and I do a quick check-off, these kids need to pull cards and lose recess time.
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Continents and Islands.....
Old 08-19-2006, 08:16 PM
 
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Typically, I arrange my children in groups of four or five, depending on how many children I have. In the beginning of the year, I randomly seat my students in these groups, and make adjustments, as needed.

One year, I had a handful of chatty kids......and no matter where I put them.......that's where the class was the noisiest! I even tried to group them together, so they would not disrupt others around them, but they still were too talkative for the whole class.

That's when I came up with the idea of "continents and islands" Continents were groups of children who could work together and be quiet at the appropriate times. Islands, on the otherhand, were those five or six children who never seemed to stop talking. Therefore, I moved their desks away from the groups and had them sitting individually.

As time passed, my "islands" realized that there was benefit being a part of a "continent", because sometimes they could work together on specified tasks. (Islands, on the other hand, were on their own, with only ME to help them.) Consequently, my "islands" wanted to merge back into the continents. I told them that they had to show me that they would be more in control of their talking. When I felt they were ready, I moved them back into a group. They realized they could be an "island" again, if needed. For most of them, they got the idea and once they were placed back in a group, they were fine from then on.

HOWEVER, there was ONE child who still didn't get the idea of when it was appropriate to talk and when it was not. He was an island for more than half the year! Then, in the second semester, he asked me if he could form a "continent" by pushing his desk next to mine. I allowed him to do that and then he tried to strike up conversations with ME! That's when I would quietly say......."we are not talking right now, but I would love to hear what you have to say during recess, snack, etc." After about a month, he FINALLY caught on! Then, I put him back into a group and he was terrific from that point on!

*NOTE-I do not expect my children to be absolutely quiet ALL Day long. However, I do let them know when it is a quiet time or when they can use "indoor voices".

Hope this will give you some ideas! Have a great year! JKB
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Chatty
Old 08-20-2006, 03:39 AM
 
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Last year my group was very chatty.. I wanted them to see how it affected the group (me included) and what we should do about it..
After filling out a chatting inventory (see attached), we decided on a Chatty Chart... Each kid had a chatty chart and the class had a chatty chart... I could give chatty reminders to individuals resulting in a mark on the their personal chart OR I could give the class a chatty mark that went on the classroom one. The first two smiley faces are freebies meaning you had two freebies for the entire week. I did this for one week and then we had a class meeting to look at our individual and classroom results as well as the initial chatty inventory... we also ralked about how cutting down on chattiness helped each student. We did it for another week and the kids hated it so the chattiness disappeared... I had no consequences tied to it (neither negative or positive) because they internalized the problem and they fixed the problem..
I will say I did have to say a few times do we need to bring back the chatty charts and that one sentence stopped them cold!
It was nice for them to notice the problem and fix it even though they were guided by me.
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File Type: doc chatinventory.doc (23.5 KB, 145 views)
File Type: doc chattychary.doc (49.5 KB, 121 views)
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Old 08-20-2006, 06:53 AM
 
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...Could you explain the Symbol Key a little? Thanks!
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Symbols
Old 08-20-2006, 11:15 AM
 
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Sure,
The symbols are for them to keep track of how many chatty reminders they get on that particular day. So they used the different symbol for the different day. (we were also studying map keys and lengends in social studies).
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Old 08-20-2006, 12:49 PM
 
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I have my students sign a Discipline Book if they can't follow directions that I share with parents. They know their parents will see it and be contacted if the behavior continues. They DO NOT like to sign the book.

If the student still can't keep quiet, I have moved them from their group and they have to earn their way back into teams. They do not like being by themselves. They realize that it is much better sitting in a team.
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practice, practice, practice
Old 08-20-2006, 02:12 PM
 
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Bethany, I had the same problems this past week! Normally the kids are SO quiet the first week of school, but not this bunch! I was so frustrated by Wed. because they wouldn't stay in their seat, listen, stop talking in the hall, etc... I realized part of the problem was their lack of structure over the summer, so we just practiced procedures until they got them right. Whenever they couldn't walk down the hall quietly, we'd practice it until they got it right. We even spent an entire recess time on Thursday learning how to sit in the bleachers in the gym in the mornings (which is where they go when they get off the bus) because they were climbing all over the place the day before. You know what?! They did it perfectly on Friday! I never had to raise my voice, I just said matter-of-factly, "Hmmm... looks like we need more practice. Let's start over and try it again. If we don't get it right this time, we'll practice it at recess until we learn it really well." By Friday they were aces!

Now...........we'll see if they remember it over the weekend!
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Talkative kiddos
Old 08-21-2006, 12:33 PM
 
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Bethany...have you heard of Harry Wong. He has some great procedures that would work well for you. He has a book that is published and can be found at Barnes and Noble or I am certain at Amazon too. Anyway...I think it would help!

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