Place Value: Teaching Strategies? - ProTeacher Community





Tainos_4
Guest
 
 

Tainos_4
Guest
 
 
Place Value: Teaching Strategies?
Old 09-10-2009, 05:34 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hello All,
I'm a tenth-year teacher, but this is my first year doing inclusion support for upper primary grades. My kiddos (3rd grade, autism spectrum and/or learning disabilities) are struggling mightily with place value (tens, hundreds, thousands, ten thousands--writing out expanded notation and also identifying which digit represents which quantity in, say, a number like 3456) , and I confess I've never been trained in delivering upper grade math instruction.

Any tips or tools you've found particularly helpful with this skill? Any two-minute arguments for why, exactly, it's worth spending a lot of time on it?


  Reply With Quote


blueheron blueheron is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 982
Blog Entries: 1

blueheron
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 982
Well, one thing that would help
Old 09-12-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

is not starting with such large numbers. Start with two digit numbers and move on to the larger numbers once the students understand. Also using manipulatives, such as ones units and tens rods helps. I used a small pocket chart with ones, tens, hundreds headings. I'd have the student draw two cards or more cards and arrange the cards in whatever order the student wished. For example, the student draws a 3 and a 2, and decides to make it a 23. Ask the student under which heading does the 2 go and which does the 3 go for 23. Have the student show how many ones units and tens rods. Next have the student write 23 is 20 + 3, and say it aloud to you. Now have the student make a new number with the same cards--32, and go through the same process. Move on to larger numbers when the smaller ones are mastered.
blueheron is offline   Reply With Quote
tainos_4
Guest
 
 

tainos_4
Guest
 
 

Old 09-12-2009, 05:45 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Thanks, blueheron!

Absolutely, smaller numbers are the way to go. I got some of those ten sticks and one cubes, and bought some cool dice from a games store (one is 10-sided with numbers 0 to 90 by tens, another is 0-9). When the rest of the class is doing challenge work or group projects, I'm going to pull a small group of strugglers (it's not just my kids having a hard time) and play a game where they role both dice and make that number with manipulatives. Hoping that this will be a fun way to practice the concept.

I'll also do the pocket chart idea: I like that a lot, because it also emphasizes that the order of the digits matters (23 versus 32).
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools



Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:49 PM.

Copyright © 2014 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
2