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Lizzie4395 Lizzie4395 is offline
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Running Records
Old 10-17-2009, 01:56 PM
 
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It was my understanding that when doing running records, the children are given a "cold read." I heard at a faculty meeting the other day that second grade teachers let the children read the guided reading book once and then do a running record on that same book the next day. I may be wrong but doesn't that sort of defeat the purpose of a running record? Would love to hear from others about this.


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the score
Old 10-17-2009, 02:20 PM
 
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is not an accurate depiction of what the child is capable of doing if they get to "practice". Now, in the past, I have had them read it cold, then reread it to themselves, then read it aloud again. The students then would graph both scores to see the growth in just two tries. This could be a nice way to show student improvement. But if the teachers are letting them practice, I think they are fixing the scores.
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I understand why it looks
Old 10-18-2009, 07:57 AM
 
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like "fixing the scores" and maybe it is, but consider this: If kids (or anyone) is given a chance to read over the passage first, might we not gain a better insight into their strategies, as well as what they can truly do? Even adults read better orally if they're allowed to look it over first. Do we want a cold read--which may contain many errors that really aren't indicative of what the child can do--or are we really interested in what they truly KNOW and can DO? Before we say it "defeats the purpose of a running record" maybe we should think carefully about what the real purpose is in doing this. We want to find out how well the child is decoding and reading, correct? Might we not get a better idea of what we're trying to gauge if we let the kids have a truly fair shot at it? I submit that a cold oral read isn't really within the realm of "fair shot."

How many times in life are you expected to do a cold oral read--for a score? It's really not authentic assessment, when you think about it.

Not meaning to be argumentative here, but there is an increasing amount of research which says it's a good idea to let the kids read it silently first. In fact, there's a whole lot of mounting evidence. Something to consider, perhaps....I also do running records in my sixth grade classroom (all struggling readers). Sometimes, we just do things one way because that's the way we've always done it---but maybe there's a different, possibly better, way.

I think we have to always be very clear on what it is we're trying to learn from any assessment. That should guide us, rather than what's "correct." If we want to know how well they do it cold, have them do it cold. If we want to know about decoding and reading in general, though, I think they should be allowed to see it first.

As a side, I am a drama coach at my school. We've started letting the kids see what they're going to read for us ahead of time. We get much better auditions that way and get a much better idea of what a kid can actually do--a cold read proved to be a very unfair way to audition kids. We were missing some kids who really could read very well--just not cold like that. In fact, one of our best readers and actresses gives the most awful cold read you ever heard--but she reads three years above grade level, and is absolutely nailing her part.

The longer I teach, the more I think that some of the ways we assess kids are really very unfair to them.
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Lizzie4395 Lizzie4395 is offline
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An "aha" moment
Old 10-18-2009, 03:21 PM
 
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Thank you so much for your insight on this topic. I truly never thought of it that way. I had always been trained to do running records one way...cold reads. You have certainly given me something to think about. I plan on trying this in my guided reading groups.
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Old 10-19-2009, 01:12 AM
 
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At my school we do it on the next day they get the book, so it's not a cold read.


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interesting discussion
Old 10-19-2009, 04:50 PM
 
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I see what you mean. It depends on your purposes behind the assessment. We use the QRI at our school, and the cold read gives very specifc information based on miscues and timing. Then it allows the students to look back and see their miscues gives them the opportunity to fix their own mistakes. I think the term "cold read" would be defined as giving students the opportunity to read something one time and getting data from that read. I think maybe what we are talking about now is more like fluency checks and even maybe more like a reading inventory. Giving students the opportunity to monitor, check, and repair their own mistakes seems like a more valuable opportunity for a true assessment of skills.
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Old 10-20-2009, 03:14 PM
 
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Lizzie, I am on the "cold read" side (no prior reading). We use the Dominie Reading and Writing Assessment Portfolio. In order to obtain a text reading level with a student, you must do a cold read with one of the books included in the kit. These books are CHALLENGING! However, you will truly know if your student is able to be independent on that particular level or not.

On the other hand, our Reading Recovery teachers embrace Marie Clay's approach which is the running record on the second read.

It's a difference of opinion I suppose. If you asked our Literacy Coach she would lean more towards my opinion.
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running record
Old 10-22-2009, 08:34 AM
 
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I was taught cold timing. But there is a purpose to letting a child practice. IF you cold time them on a piece, have them practice, then time them again on the same piece, you and the child will see improvement. THis will/ could help the child see what benefit practicing / reading will do!
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