What is a 'cognitive dictionary'? - ProTeacher Community




      
Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      ARCHIVE


What is a 'cognitive dictionary'?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Risa's Avatar
Risa Risa is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 5,809
Senior Member

Risa
 
Risa's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 5,809
Senior Member
What is a 'cognitive dictionary'?
Old 09-30-2006, 12:00 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Back in July I attended a week long reading strategies training. I was just reviewing my notes from that session and came across the term "cognitive dictionary" as a strategy several people said they used in their classes to build vocabulary. I meant to ask more about it, but never had the opportunity. I jotted the note "GLAD strategy" next to it, so maybe that will help someone know what it means. I 'googled' it, but didn't get any useful information. Many of the links that looked like they referred to reading weren't working, so I decided to post here to look for help.

I'm hoping someone will be able to explain its components and how it works so I can use it with my students, too. Thanks!


Risa is offline   Reply With Quote

kristen_teach's Avatar
kristen_teach kristen_teach is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 925
Senior Member

kristen_teach
 
kristen_teach's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 925
Senior Member

Old 09-30-2006, 10:14 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I googled it and this is what I found:
http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:...s&ct=clnk&cd=1

I then typed in www.psd1.org/glad and found a website about Guided Language Aquisition Design.

If you click on the GLAD toolkit and then GLAD strategies, you can find this Word document about cognitive dictionaries:
http://www.psd1.org/glad/GLADforms/strategies/ccd.doc

And, finally, here is the word document for you to print out for your classroom:
http://www.psd1.org/glad/GLADforms/COGdictFORM.doc

According to the website: For more information refer to Bringing it all Together by Marcia Brechtel.

*I went to a workshop this summer and the presenter said NOT to have the students predict the meanings of new words. They often get the predictions wrong but continue to thing they are right. I'm not too sure about research confirming or denying this but just a heads up.



kristen_teach is offline   Reply With Quote
Risa's Avatar
Risa Risa is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 5,809
Senior Member

Risa
 
Risa's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 5,809
Senior Member
Thanks a lot, Kristen!
Old 09-30-2006, 02:53 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Quote:
And, finally, here is the word document for you to print out for your classroom
THANKS!! That answered my question!

I, too, did a lot of searching and found most of the same information you posted. When I found the classroom observation checklist, it gave me a bit more information about the strategies used in this program, but still not enough to try to incorporate them into my instruction. I was disappointed that the Guided Language Aquisition Design (G.L.A.D.) webpage didn't have a more detailed explanation of the program's goals and objectives, oir even just how this program design works its components. It sounded like it was a very effective program from those who kept referring to it.

I was glad that you managed to find the one piece that I was really wanting to know, which was something that listed the components of a 'cognitive dictionary.'
I realized later, after I continued to read through more of my notes, that I scribbled something about how it's important to sketch some sort of picture to help the brain remember the new word, and that came out in the page that described the 'step by step' of a cognitive content dictionary. I didn't find that on the table that was downloaded, but I guess I could just add a column for a quickie illustration.

Regarding your tip about not having students guess the wrong meaning... I can see how a student might believe he/she is right if there is no discussion about the word. I think we have our students conditioned, to some extent, to believe they have given the 'correct' answer if we don't elaborate on or question their answers. Not sure how to handle this, since, as you stated, we don't really have any research confirming or denying that the wrong initial information may end up giving the student a mistaken impression about the accurate word meaning. All the more reason, I suppose, to make sure that there is adequate discussion and explanation when we confirm the correct 'final meaning'.

Thanks for all your time and your investigative skills!!
Risa is offline   Reply With Quote
QW's Avatar
QW QW is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 618
Senior Member

QW
 
QW's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 618
Senior Member
another thought
Old 09-30-2006, 05:17 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I was thinking about how the poster said not to have the students predict the meaning of the word because it often stayed "wrong" in their head if they were incorrect.
In Classroom Strategies that Work, the authors say that often, teachers introduce a new topic with something bizarre or unusual to get the students' attention, but that research has shown this is not a good idea. It is better to stick to the content that you really want them to know, because often their minds will focus on the bizarre or unusual, and remember that instead of what you are trying to teach that is important. Thought I'd mention it because it seems to kind of go along with what you were talking about in a round-about way. I'm thinking maybe that applies in this situation, too, and it is research based. Interesting topic--I'm going to look at those websites right away.
QW is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
ARCHIVE
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:31 PM.


Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net