Novice vs. Expert teachers - ProTeacher Community


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Novice vs. Expert teachers
Old 01-25-2010, 06:00 PM
 
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In my current master's class, we have been asked to describe the differences between a novice teacher and an expert teacher. I have my opinions, but I would love to hear other insights on this issue.


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Old 01-25-2010, 06:43 PM
 
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Expert teachers know:
  • How to prioritize and accomplish paperwork
  • How to read a child to know if they are understanding or not
  • Know how to talk to parents about difficult topics and have the parents remain calm. even if they disagree or are not ready to hear what the teacher is saying
  • Are confident in speaking to the Principal and others to advocate for children and have the facts and documentation in order to back it up to ensure success ( getting what they set out to get for the child)
  • Know when to backoff on a child and give them time, or come up with many other different ways to help that child learn
  • How to get parents to work with them to help their children meet with success
Novice Teachers:
Have the hope, energy and enthusiasm to move mountains and change childrens' lives- and that is what it takes to eventually become an expert teacher- years of self evaluation, hard work, and persistence with the knowledge that every child really does count and that we do make a difference.
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Old 01-25-2010, 06:49 PM
 
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Expert teachers think about learning from the perspective of the student and think about each learning task during planning They adapt to the needs of students during teaching. Novice teachers use specific lesson objectives to form structured lesson plans. They are still learning and may not adapt to meet student needs during teaching.
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Well said, Fiona!
Old 01-25-2010, 06:50 PM
 
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You answered that question spot-on! Wow!
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Old 01-26-2010, 09:06 AM
 
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Expert teachers know what each student already understands and teaches the next step accordingly.
Novice teachers are to busy doing all the details right, which are already mastered by expert teachers.


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Old 01-26-2010, 05:40 PM
 
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Expert teachers recognize those "teachable moments" and run with them.
Expert teachers can teach from the hip and not look at a plan.
Expert teachers know when a lesson is tanking and can re-evaluate on the fly.
Expert teachers can answer the phone, while listening to a child read, and answer a note from another teacher all at the same time.
Expert teachers can hear a conversation between 2 children even though all 34 of them are talking
Expert teachers get so excited to meet other teachers and talk about teaching methods.
A novice teacher is scared and excited and nervous.
An expert teacher is exhausted!
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Veteran vs. Beginner
Old 01-26-2010, 06:22 PM
 
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These are great lists which really reflect our complex job which involves reaching the whole child--intellectually and emotionally.

I might add the ability to implement multiple programs into the curriculum. Even expert teachers will say, "I can only do one new thing this year" such as Interactive Notebooks. But as they go along, more balls can be added to the juggling act: IN, writer's workshop, cooperative learning, multiple intelligences, technology, and so on, just to name a few.

Experts are less likely to need busy work, such as photocopied worksheets which don't really result in progress (we've all been there simply because as tchrpen said, we are exhausted). They have been able to build a storehouse of authentic, complex, higher level activities which truly focus on critical learning--what's most important--weeding out the wastes-of-time.

Expert lessons are more likely to have the components of building on what kids know, effective sequencing, active learning strategies, assessment, monitoring/adjusting (as several said), closure, etc. because expert teachers simply have a larger knowledge base of techniques.

Oh, and those eyes in the back of the head

Most of the veteran teachers I know still dedicate themselves and are just as frazzled as the beginners, but often seem just more jaded and a bit less enthusiastic about extras, like chaperoning the 8th grade dance until or the 6th grade lock-in (sleep on the gym floor surrounded by 6th graders for the 5th year in a row--no thanks)!
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Old 01-27-2010, 02:17 PM
 
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Expert teachers begin with the end in mind.

Expert teachers can "read" a child's emotions before he/she has spoken a word.

Expert teachers know the value of reteaching a concept the students haven't mastered.

Expert teachers can use technology, even though they may not have grown up with it.

Expert teachers know when to supplement a lesson.

Expert teachers teach children in small groups whenever possible.

Expert teachers see the value in affirming each child every day, even if it's hard to do.

Expert teachers view discipline as instructional, not punitive.

Expert teachers can handle an emergency situation with calmness and speed.

Expert teachers can describe a student's progress by using standardized measures to give precise information.

Novice teachers are in "survival mode" most of the time.

Novice teachers depend on worksheets or pre-programmed materials.

Novice teachers do a lot of whole group instruction.

Novice teachers often are afraid to admit it when they don't know something.

Novice teachers see discipline as punitive, not instructional.

Novice teachers spend a lot of time learning the curriculum and using it.

Novice teachers describe a student's progress in general, rather than specific terms.

Novice teachers may have difficulty handling emergency situations and/or knowing how to get help when needed.

Novice teachers can get frustrated by criticism and suggestions for improvement.
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