I want to quit teaching, what else can i do? - ProTeacher Community





MissRose04 MissRose04 is offline
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I want to quit teaching, what else can i do?
Old 04-19-2010, 03:45 PM
 
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I am a first year teacher (only 4 moths in) and i hate my job. i work with kids with emotional disabilities and im about ready to quit. im actually ready to quit teaching all together, and although that has to do somewhat with this job, thats not completly it. i want a job that is just a job. a job where i can come home and not worry about work until work the next day. i dont want to plan, to do paperwork, to grade, etc, etc. its just hard because i have a masters in teaching so i spent 5 years in something that i dont want to do. does anyone know of any jobs i could get with the degrees i have that pay an okay amout ($30,000 and up)? i live in ny, have a bacholors degree in childhood education and a masters in special education and literacy. i would love to do day care and i actually have an interview for it coming up for a teacher position, but i dont think they pay anything good at all. so does anyone have any suggestions for jobs? id be willing to take any job that is just a job.


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No more teaching
Old 04-26-2010, 12:28 PM
 
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While I agree it's good you are getting out of teaching, MissRose, I think you are being WAY to harsh dolfin02. Teaching isn't her (or his) cup of tea, and that's okay. She (or he) realizes that and is willing to make changes. There are plenty of days I want to be "selfish" too and not bring papers or lesson plans or grade books home. I do it because it's part of a job I love, but not everybody has to or does want to do these things.

MissRose, if you want to continue working with children, but do not necessarily want the pressures of teaching, you could perhaps look into directing an after school program. I'm sorry I don't have too many ideas, but good luck to you in your new journey.
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Old 04-27-2010, 03:47 AM
 
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Dolfin02 I agree we don't need teachers who aren't going to do their jobs or hate doing their jobs; however, you seem a little too harsh on this poster. They didn't say they do not care about children and quite honestly, I think they may not have been prepared for the emotional turmoil teaching can put one through. I don't for a second believe the real gripe here is paperwork and grades.

Teaching comes from the heart, there are those who have it and those who don't. I am going to look at the positive side here and say YAY, this person has made a wonderful decision at a time it really counts...rather than waiting 20 years and punishing every kid that graces their classroom, b/c they hate teaching.

NOW TO THE POSTER: (sorry I forgot your name) If you still have a love for children, think about something else you can do within the school system. Yeah, you don't like the paperwork of being a classroom teacher...what about an aide or paraprofessional. (Keep in mind I only suggest these as options if you still have a love for children--can't stress that enough) Also there are desk jobs you might consider within a school...anything from office worker, copy room attendant, to some sort of program cooridinator. Not that none of these jobs come without paperwork, but I believe most of them would allow you to leave it at work and not take it home.

As for jobs outside of education...good luck on that...I have no advice for you there.
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Alternative to Teaching
Old 04-27-2010, 01:35 PM
 
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I am little confused as to how you got through your undergrad studies without realizing the mountain of work teachers have - not to mention getting your masters degree. Either way, since you feel this way congrats on knowing you want to do something else. I am trying to think of a job where you don't have anything to worry about once you walk out the door and all that comes to mind are dead end jobs that pay minimum wage. I was always interested in psychology so maybe you can look into these types of jobs - although paperwork would be sure to follow. Good luck on your search. I would be interested to see what you choose to do. Day care is definitely not your thing if you don't like children 100% of the time and not just some of the time. Those children are definitey a challenge but if you're heart is there you can make it happen.
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I feel your pain, but...
Old 05-04-2010, 10:54 AM
 
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I completely hear ya! The mounds of paperwork are astronomical! Last year was my first year and I can honestly say I almost walked out 3 times! Just walked out. It was not because of the kiddoes. It was because of the women I worked with as well as the mounds of paperwork (& grading), and staying late every night to plan for the next day. I say ALL of that to say...this year is SOOOO much better!! I promise each passing year will become easier and easier. Here I am about to finish my second year and I am totally pumped about what is to come next year! Now, maybe you could get in a regular ed. classroom. Special Education itself requires a lot more paper work than just a regular classroom teacher. I honestly think you should just hang in there. It will get better. I have always heard it, "Don't quit until you have taught for 3 years!" I'm serious...I think that is so true because I am a living, breathing example of almost quitting.

I noticed you just started in January also. That's crazy in itself. Starting out a new year, in August, from scratch is going to make a HUGE difference. I think you should try it! : )

Good luck!


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what else
Old 05-04-2010, 11:34 AM
 
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You could do tutoring at Sylvan or a place like that.

Have you considered teaching abroad? It could be really interesting teaching in another country.
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Old 05-08-2010, 02:36 AM
 
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I'm sorry you're having such a rough time. Please know that it is extremely difficult for everyone in the beginning.

You may want to consider teaching one more year in a different area of special education. You've only been at it for 4 months. Research tells us that new teachers go through a period of feeling very overwhelmed at that point. If you've only been teaching 4 months, then I assume you took over a class when someone else left. That is a very difficult thing to do and really quite different from setting up your own class from the beginning of the year.

The biggest thing that makes me think you might want to reconsider is that you're working in emotionally disturbed. That is a very difficult area no matter how experienced you are. It is so emotionally draining at times that everything else in your life can seem so overwhelming. You may find that if you are in an area of teaching that is a better fit for you that the paperwork seems more manageable. It will always be there, but you'll have the energy (physically and mentally) to deal with it and it won't be as bad.

Just something to think about b/c if you're considering day care then you still have an interest in the kids.
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I feel your pain
Old 05-19-2010, 02:32 PM
 
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This is my third year teaching. I loved it the first two. Although, it killed me. The workload was non stop. I lived for my students. My third year took a whole different level when a new principal came in and destroyed me. Every year I told myself it was worth it, to see your students improve from where they were is amazing. Now, that this year is coming to a close I can't wait to put this nightmare behind me. If the leadership academy is the future of NYC DOE then I want nothing to do with it!! A teachers job is truly a sacrifice and God bless all those teachers who hang in there. I no longer wish to give up time with my kids and family. For those who have a degree in education your options are thin but not hopeless. The job market is picking up so go out there. I am a NYCTF and had a career prior to becoming a teacher. Although I will have to start from the beginning I am grateful to get out of the ball and chain that is teaching.
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Old 06-06-2010, 04:29 PM
 
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What about a media specialist either at the school or a regular library? Also, you might look into educational programs for example, imagine just about anyplace you could take a field trip... they probably have an educational specialist to plan the program.
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change
Old 06-11-2010, 06:12 PM
 
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Become a specialist - reading, dyslexia, esl. You work with small groups of students throughout the day. No papers to take home. You can use checklists for grading. I'm doing that now after many years in the classroom. I love it.
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Old 06-12-2010, 08:46 PM
 
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That's a great idea, too.
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tutor or assistant
Old 06-20-2010, 11:18 AM
 
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I can't imagine working at a job other than teaching, but I admire you for realizing that, even after all of your hard work in school, it's not your cup of tea. Teaching is truly a full time job that often gets taken home with you.

I don't know about pay, but what about being a tutor, assistant, substitute, or Title 1 teacher?
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business ideas
Old 06-23-2010, 10:26 AM
 
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I know of a few teachers who became trainers in the business world. What about helping to edit/research/sell/coach new textbooks/curriculum models? Maybe some kind of admin, research, coordinators in a nonprofit company- children's home, women's crisis, boy's/girl's clubs, girl/boy scouts? There are other jobs out there, but they are often things you have to really search for.

As some others have posted maybe something within the schools but different? My 1st two years were terrible, I had two terrible classes. I got a new position teaching technology (each class in our building for 45 minutes a week. I could handle any group for only 45 minutes! I also spent a year as a technology coach, now I am back in the classroom due to budget cuts, and the experiences in the other jobs really helped me feel more comfortable in the classroom. Are there positions such as data leaders or curriculum coaches in your district?

Good luck in your search and congratulations on being willing to admit that you are in the wrong field.
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If You Have To Stay . . .
Old 07-03-2010, 03:56 PM
 
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I got the best advice while I was doing my student teaching last year. It may sound a little impossible, but I found that it really worked for me (I hated student teaching and when I started doing this- everything turned out a lot better). The veteran teacher who perscribed me this advice said:

"Leave your personal life at home and your professional life at school."

To me this meant that I don't spend time during my teaching day to worry about or even think too much about what I was doing at home and I don't spend any time at home doing things I do for school. For example, I stay until the work is done but still set a time limit. And if it isn't done by 5:00 pm (or whatever time you decide) I go home and do not take it with me- it will have to be done another day. If I have to go to the store or the library or anywere else for school, I go right after work on my way home and it still has to fit into my time limit.

There is no way that you can be expected to spend 12 hours a day working. It's unethical. I wish you the best of luck in whatever you decide to do!
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Great Advice!!
Old 07-04-2010, 07:56 PM
 
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Thank you for posting this adivce... I am going to take it with me on my first year of teaching!
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be a sub
Old 07-05-2010, 06:32 PM
 
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There are a lot of sub positions that pay pretty well and unless you take a long term position you never have to take work home. I dont know if you have this in New York but in PA you can become apart of a theraputic support staff TSS or a wrap around...you get paid pretty well doing this too and you work one on one with a child on the spectrum. It does require some paperwork but not as much as a teacher. Daycare to me is more work and less money. I started in a daycare and hated it sooo much too much work for 12 bucks.
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Highest paid in education don't teach...
Old 07-06-2010, 06:47 PM
 
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Have you considered administration? With your degrees you'd seem suitable for some sort of ed. admin. Or something like a site literacy professional. Heck, even a curriculum designer. If all else fails, write a book!
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Don't Give Up Just Yet!!
Old 07-12-2010, 05:00 PM
 
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Try teaching for another year. A full year in a regular classroom. I think you will find to love it; however, I do understand where you're coming from. This is my 3rd year teaching and I LIVE, BREATH, and SLEEP my students but it's all the admin stuff that makes you second guess staying in the field. If you can get pass all the admin stuff and really have a passion for teaching, I say give it another shot in a regular classroom setting. I really believe that you will find to LOVE it. It gets hard but when I go into my classroom with my 24 little 1st graders and they come up to me or write me a letter saying how they love me and appreciate me teaching them, all the "other" stuff doesn't even matter. I hope that you will find this to be true for you! At the end of the day, you have to do whatever makes you happy. Good Luck!
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Old 09-04-2010, 03:59 PM
 
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I totally agree about leaving teaching... however, I FINALLY have a wonderful class that has already made me remember how much I love it. I am still looking into other things... but my degree is in Literacy/ELL (Master) and El Ed K-6 (Bachelor) so it's hard to think of what else I could do. Does anyone know? I love fitness and nutrition...
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Old 10-03-2010, 12:00 PM
 
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I taught in Philly for the first two years of my teachering career. It was the worst experience of my life. I had talked many times with my family about going back to school, but then changed my mind because I really do love my career choice, I just did not like my position at the time.

I kept telling myself that everyone needs to start somewhere. The first few years out of school everyone needs to "pay their dues". The first year teachers that get hired in the perfect school districts are flat out lucky. It takes time to get the job you want.
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Where are you now?
Old 11-11-2010, 06:37 PM
 
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Hi MissRose,
This is my 1st year teaching and I feel the same way you do/did. I'm not sp. ed. but I'm teaching 5th grade and I really hate it. I've had all of my internships/student teaching in 1st & 2nd grade because that's the grade I want to teach. Let me just tell you that I've always known "who I was" and I've always done what I said I was going to do. So here's my problem: the very first week I started teaching, a bunch of red flags went up in my mind and I thought, "I can't do this for the rest of my life." I, too, immediately thought of daycare because I feel like I can teach kids from my heart without all of the NCLB testing bs. My boyfriend keeps telling me to suck it up and try to get a 2nd grade position but I told him it doesn't work like that; you take what they give you etc. I really just want a 9-5 job where I can leave my work there and come home to my personal life. I've never been so depressed/lost. So-I was just wondering if you stayed with teaching or if you did end up in daycare?
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I completely understand
Old 12-01-2010, 05:45 PM
 
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Last year was my first full year of teaching (I had a long term substitute position the year before) and it was my last year. I HATED it! It was the worst year of my life. It caused me so much stress that I began seeing a psychologist to help my cope and get through the school year. I taught middle school science in a fairly low income area. The students were very disrespectful, administration was absolutely no help and basically sent students back to class if I sent them to the office and also me feel like I was doing a terrible job, and most parents were unreachable. To feel this way after putting in soooo much time every week was practically unbearable. I put a lot of though into it and I decided teaching isn't for me. I want to be good at my job. I have spoken to countless teachers, veteran teachers included, and many of them say you NEVER really feel good at it and that it can take several years to get your classroom management down. Even after 15 years of teaching a teacher told me she still sometimes struggles with wondering if she did the right thing, is her way of doing things best, etc. I want to feel good about what I do. I also want to enjoy my life and not have have my job effect other areas of my life the way teaching did. I think those who enjoy teaching must be really good at leaving work at work and not letting it affect their home life. Yes, it was nice to see students learn and appreciate what you do, but in the end the bad FAR outweighed the good for me.

Sorry this post is so long but I just totally understand.

AS for what else you can do...ANYTHING! I am fortunate enough the be able to go back to school. My husband and I will be able to pay our bills (barely) while I go back to school to be a medical technologist. It is just a year program for me because of my background in science.

Toward the end of the school year I was very worried and felt helpless because I hated teaching so much but I did not know what to do. After being out of school over the summer I began letting go of the stress and negative feelings and then my possibilities were endless. I don't know your exact situation but may letting you know what I was thinking about will help. Some required me going back to school, some not.

I tried to think about what I enjoy...

Culinary school
opening a small diner
opening a food truck
catering
nursing (a stressful job in itself)
radiation therapy
occupational therapy
physical therapy
web design
opening a daycare
working in a laboratory (science background)
veterinary school
working in a veterinary office
starting a dog walking business

I know that if you follow your heart you will find what is right for you. Try not to let the stress of your job stop you from thinking positively about future career options. Good luck.
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Old 02-10-2011, 06:38 PM
 
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It is interesting to read the postings of so many new teachers. I remember (vaguely) my first years in the field. They were not much to speak of, in terms of my experiences with administrators and colleagues, but the memories of my students, some of whom I still see, brings me joy.
I have been teaching for 23 years. I have certifications in several areas and have taught SPED and ESL. Most of my career has been spent in urban, poorly equipped schools. I have spent a great deal of money and energy building classroom environments that stimulate learning and address the affective needs of my students. I have had great success with raising test scores and helping kids find their inner beauty-their inner song birds.
Some of my students call me "Mom". i TRULY LOVE THEM with all of my heart. I stayed in the profession to be a blessing to them and their families, and, of course, to bring glory to the God I love. But, quite honestly, I never wanted to be a teacher.
I tried to escape several times, but God always brought me back to the classroom.I have consider lateral moves within the field, but I don't desire to be a politician (school administrator. For I have seen how such power has turned some men ans women into tyrants and power mongers.
Also, teachers can be the meanest, most viciously jealous people on the planet. It seems they can get away with it by playing their "Guess who I know card". A hand shake here, a smile and wave there and WHAM! their "power" seems solidified.
I have worked with adults, teens, adolescents, and elementary age students, but the challenges have been similar.
However, I genuinely believe that I did what I did because God needed me there-at those schools and institutions- during those seasons. I do wish I could have speent my years doing what I love, but I had to do what God compelled me to do. I hope that you get to do what you love, but you may be called upon to do what is needed. Sometimes, we are asked to step away from our own passions in order to contribute to a greater good.
I sometimes lament the time spent in education and the abuses I have both seen and suffered by K-12 political collective, but during those moments, I remind myself that I did it for God, not for man.
I pray that I will one day get to enjoy a career that is more naturally suited to my introverted personality, but if I never get that opportunity I will always have the blessed memories of the kids I loved, the kids that loved me, and the victories I won over those who sought to harm us.
Peace.
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Old 05-09-2011, 05:42 PM
 
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Quit! It will not get better. I spent 8 years as a NYC teacher. I was a software engineer for 15 years. Teaching was the biggest mistake of my life.

Petty administrators were constantly attacking my work. Classes were full of children who did not belong with children who wanted education.

I learned, the hard way, that it is arrogant to believe all children should get an education. It is unrealistic to believe all children can be educated. It is a crime to allow a small population of ill-mannered, socially inept children to hinder the education of the majority.

Don't sacrifice your happiness and well being. It is not worth it.
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So, what was the end result?
Old 10-24-2011, 05:06 PM
 
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I notice the post that you made a while back, and wanted to know what you ended up doing? I am in the same situtation and want some advice...
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Old 03-15-2012, 02:07 PM
 
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I too am distraught and agree it will not get better. I have stayed way to long in this profession. I teach social studies and was "let go" twice because the school needed a coach and I was not. After walking the unemployment line both times I found another job but at a low performing school- they wanted a female teacher. now I'm tenured and at the time this was and is the best job I could get. Social studies degrees don't equate into anything in the real world. I would walk out of my classroom in a minute if I had another job to go to. I don't recommend anyone to go into teaching.
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I feel your pain.
Old 09-03-2012, 01:11 PM
 
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I completely understand where you are coming from. I have been teaching for 10 years and loved it at first. Over the last couple of years I have found myself getting increasingly dissatisfied because of the constant shift from one "new" teaching fad to another. Educators claim some new technique but it really looks back to something old for its basis. I am an art educator and I'm frankly tired of fighting to get my kids what they need to be able learn. Despite all my efforts and growth in the programs and student learning we are treated as second rate. It's just getting old and I'm getting burned out.

My family is contemplating a move and this would be a prime opportunity for me to make a big change.
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Old 10-01-2012, 07:49 PM
 
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I would like some advice on this too.

I am sick of losing my nights, weekends and MY LIFE to this stupid, thankless job.

Any ideas anyone?
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i am quitting!!!
Old 10-25-2012, 04:23 PM
 
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i have been teaching for cps (chicago) for 23 years. the last five, i have been absolutely miserable with a capital M. ive been so despondent that i went to the doctor and informed him that i have contemplated suicide so that i can go on medical leave. (i actually did think of ways that i could seriously hurt myself to prevent going to work) well, he didnt take that too well and wanted to 'commit' me...YIKES!!! so i promised to 'get help' and seek other opportunites.

the point is this.....i have enough saved for 4 years if i cannot find my 'dream' job of working the fashion industry. i am NOT teaching pass december no matter what. i am depressed, unmotivated, listless, and just tired of complaining. no amount of money is worth your LIFE!!! i will work at mcdonalds, ups, walmart, i dont care. please, if you can find a way out...do it!!! at my age i was even thinking of going to a city college and completing their six month program for a pharmaceutical tech..i can work in walgreens. be happy....it wont get any better if you dont make a choice to change your OWN DESTINY!!!
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good 4u!!
Old 11-07-2012, 05:26 PM
 
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i posted the post above yours; i think its post 29. i havent quit and i have been a special ed teacher for 23 years!! i dont know what i am waiting for...suicide? but....good for you. dont worry too much about the money; you will be alright. your hapiness and sanit is worth more than a check. i sincerly hope our business is successful. good luck to you!!!!!!!!!
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Me too
Old 12-08-2012, 07:07 PM
 
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I am a special educator for a 6:1:1 class and this is my first year of teaching. I am feeling really stressed now. I love teaching but I cannot stand the fact that I have to spend my weeknights and weekends doing lesson plans. Also, I am not getting mentoring and support from the school. This is just completely wrong. I feel like quitting.
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go forwards
Old 12-10-2012, 07:20 PM
 
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dear me too:

i say if you can; quit! BUT>>>>>go back to school and get another degree or training in something not related to teaching. nursing? denistry? fashion? whatever you decide, donot have it relate to teaching. that way if you get really really stressed out and start to hate teaching, you will have a back up plan before you have too many years invested in your career and pension. i received two masters in education and now wish i wouldve gotten at least one of those degrees in something TOTALLY different. i may stay in teaching but then again i only have to work 1.5 more years before i have a solid pension. i wont be 55, but i can work in walmart for 8 years;till i am of pension age. i hate teaching with a passion!
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