need advice - classroom teacher lied at iep meeting - ProTeacher Community



WriterGal WriterGal is offline
Junior Member
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 60

WriterGal
Junior Member
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 60
need advice - classroom teacher lied at iep meeting
Old 05-26-2010, 05:49 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hello wonderful special ed/exceptional children teachers!
My son has (diagnosed) ADHD and has been having serious behavioral problems all year in his classroom. It has not been uncommon for us to get notes home 50 -75% of the days of the month about his behavior. Most days his behavior (as logged by his teacher) has been below the acceptable range, and his teacher even allows them to move "up" as they redeem themselves throughout the day so it's not like he screwed up once or twice and then was stuck for the day.
My son is also on, or just below grade level for all his subjects.
I requested a meeting to determine whether or not kiddo should have an IEP based on his behavior. I had outside evaluations done - we also had them done last summer - and we all met. Both last year's assessments and this year's assessments noticed significant attentional problems with my son. This is WITH medication.
At the meeting the narrative the teacher provided said that my son had no attentional or behavioral problems in the classroom.
I showed them a sampling of the notes that have been sent home, and I even showed them a calendar where I color-coded the days his behavior was unacceptable. I told them that the assistant told me some days she had to sit with my child all day to keep him calm, and the teacher also told me that some days she couldn't teach the class b/c of dealing w/my son's behavior.
They just looked blankly at me.
Now - I realize that getting an IEP is hard to get based on behavior, especially since my son is "accessing the curriculum." I kind of expected we'd be turned down...but I didn't expect that the teacher would lie about my child's behavior. The teacher also said that my son did his homework...which was another blatent lie b/c I have to sit and do the homework with my child and if we're lucky we get 2 of the 8 or so homework sheets completed for the year.
I am not sure what to do now.
I was thinking of writing a letter to go with the report so I can at least have it on record that we feel the report is incorrect.
Thoughts?????


WriterGal is offline   Reply With Quote


unseen001's Avatar
unseen001 unseen001 is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,867

unseen001
Senior Member
 
unseen001's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,867

Old 05-26-2010, 06:09 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I know after our meeting we have to sign off on them. You could always mark disagree with the statements. I have done that a few times. They had to go back and look at more data. In most cases it helped.
unseen001 is offline   Reply With Quote
SDT's Avatar
SDT SDT is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 936

SDT
Senior Member
 
SDT's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 936

Old 05-26-2010, 08:52 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

You need to find a parent advocate to help you figure this out. There are differences in laws from state to state and differences in regulations and procedures from district to district. If you don't know of anyone in your area, call your state department of education and ask someone in the special education division. A parent advocate can help you figure out what you need to do next and educate you on policies, procedures and laws.
SDT is offline   Reply With Quote
Azure's Avatar
Azure Azure is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 1,700

Azure
Senior Member
 
Azure's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 1,700
Don't sign off
Old 05-26-2010, 11:24 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

on ANYTHING. Table the meeting. Tell them you do not agree with the team and you want a parent advocate with you at the next meeting. Bring all documentation you have alone with his current report card grades.
I can tell you in my district, if a child is working on grade level, they do not recieve services. This coming year the only children who will have 1:1's in the class are those students who needs someone for safety reasons. That's it.
You would probably be told that you need to speak to your Dr. and have your son's meds adjusted as they are not working the way they are suppose to. It sounds to me maybe he has grown this year. When kids have eany growth spurts, their meds need to be adjusted. There are also different type of meds. He may need a change. He may need to take something at lunch as well as breakfast and dinner.

Our students will only get IEP's if they are working 2+ years below grade level. If his grades are consistent with his IQ then he is working up to his capacity. It's hard to hear, but those students do not get additional support.
That's why you need to talk to his Dr.
Azure is offline   Reply With Quote
mama_me
Guest
 
 

mama_me
Guest
 
 

Old 05-26-2010, 11:56 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

We talk to his doctor every month.
My son does not respond well to traditional meds. He had about 7 meds. adjustments this year - this is one reason why his behavior was so out of control.
But that's beside the point, actually. I'm not complaining that we did not get the IEP. I expected that. I'm saying the TEACHER LIED and said my child had no behavior or attention problems when in fact I have documentation from the teacher that says that there were lots of behavior and attention problems.
And for people who said to contact an advocate - I did, and they only work with families and kids who already have an IEP.
The system is truly, truly messed up.
I am a teacher, too, and I am professionally offended by this teacher's conduct, as well as the other "professionals" at the meeting.


  Reply With Quote
teach 4th
Guest
 
 

teach 4th
Guest
 
 
advocate
Old 05-26-2010, 12:22 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I am not sure if the meeting you had was the results of an evaluation for an IEP that you had requested or if you 'only' had requested a meeting to talk about your concerns. If you have not made an official request for an eval -make one in writing now. One of the rules in sped seems to be:If it is not in writing it never happend -I am glad you have documentation of problems in writing. Write a letter to the SW (and find someone else to cc it to) and restate your concerns, what you have in writing from teachers and from a doc. Do not go into the teachers 'wrong' statements and just give the facts about your concerns. Leave a papertrail. The squeeky parent gets the services. From what you write your kid might qualify for an IEP or a 504.
Get Wrightslaws's 'From emotions to advocacy' to understand your parental rights -you will need it to advocate for your kid.
  Reply With Quote
kristabel kristabel is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 650

kristabel
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 650

Old 05-26-2010, 06:55 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

In our district, your boy would have to have a Behavior Intervention Plan. You'd start with a Functional Behavior Assessment, which in turn would come from questionaries supplied to parents and teachers of the child. If your feeling is that his behavior stops him from accessing the curriculum, he'd also have to have 2 research-based interventions (that didn't yield positive results) to consider an EH placement. The objective data must be there to support the feelings.

As far as OHI for ADHD, if the ADHD has not resulted in the inability to successfully access the curriculum, he should not be placed. An IEP and SPED services should be a challenge to meet. I'm afraid that for a while there kids were labelled and placed for very poor, if not unsubstantiated reasons.

I guess what I'm saying is that the presence of a condition that meets IDEAs definition of a disability is not enough in and of itself to make the placement. The child also must be having difficulty accessing the curriculum and must require specifically designed instruction to do so. We have lots of ADHD kids who are making the grade; so, just the presence of the disorder is not sufficient grounds for placement.

Good luck with your case. Keep collecting data so that when you do meet, you have documentation to back up what you are trying to impart.
kristabel is offline   Reply With Quote
blueheron blueheron is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 982
Blog Entries: 1

blueheron
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 982
As other posters mentioned ADHD is not a
Old 05-26-2010, 08:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

category for eligibility. However, there are non-academic areas for specially designed instruction, such as behavior, social and emotional skills, adaptive skills, organization and study skills. I can imagine that your son would benefit from participating social skills even if he does not officially have an IEP. I conclude students without IEPs in my social skills if the student intervention team recommends it. One very important skill students who meltdown can learn is recognizing when they are feeling stressed, and learning what to do about. For example, I have one student who comes into my room for short breaks when he or his gen. ed. teacher recognize he is getting overwrought. He sets the timer and jumps on the trampoline or plays with toys, assesses his state of mind and returns to class if he is calm. He works in a workbook I keep for him if he is not ready to be with the class.

I really do hope that your son can get the support he needs even without an IEP. It sounds like he is having a very hard year.
blueheron is offline   Reply With Quote
mommy3&paco mommy3&paco is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 141

mommy3&paco
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 141

Old 05-27-2010, 05:33 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

How is your relationship with the teacher? Would you feel comfortable talking to her about her report? If the assistant in the classroom needs to sit with your child and he is disturbing the learning of others than there is a problem with his behavior. I agree with you. I would be more confused than anything else. I would take all your data and the report and ask her about it all.
mommy3&paco is offline   Reply With Quote
WriterGal WriterGal is offline
Junior Member
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 60

WriterGal
Junior Member
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 60
Thank you all...
Old 05-28-2010, 01:56 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I am waiting until I get my copies of the report to comment on it further, but I've drafted a letter I'm going to send to everyone involved, as well as the principal and the head of the department at the county level as well. Basically, it's going to say that although I understand why my son is not going to get an IEP (because in our county we wait for a child to fail before we give accommodations) that some of the items in the narrative are inaccurate, and here's why (attaching proof). One of the exceptional children's teachers at my school is going to help me with the letter so it makes most sense to those who will read it.
The crazy thing is that I felt like I had a great relationship with this teacher all year long, so I'm not sure why the falsehoods on the report, especially since I had proof otherwise. I feel like maybe this teacher was supposed to have taken action on my child's behavior himself and didn't (in our district we've just implemented RTI and at the very least my kiddo should've gotten a behavioral PEP - of course I find this out after the fact, so I went the IEP route instead. I work in the same district and in another school but I am only part-time this year AND I am not a classroom teacher so I missed the RTI training and all of this was explained to me this week by my co-workers).
Another thing that happened was that very soon after I asked for the IEP eligibility meeting the teacher started a new behavioral plan on my son and bam - all of a sudden he was coming home with good behavior marks. This corresponded to an increase in medications, so I'm sure my son's behavior had improved somewhat, but it was a little false to base it on the plan, especially since I asked kiddo what had happened and he said nothing - that the teacher had stopped making him "change his color" when he got in trouble. Which was further born out during volunteer time when I observed my son refuse to work, swear at other kids, etc., and even get consequences for behaviors...and it wasn't reflected in his behavior chart. Other kids did less worse offenses and they had to "change their color."
So there you go. Very professional behavior. It's all about the kid - not.
???
I will be sooooo happy once school's out. We all need a serious break. And all I can hope for is next year we get a teacher who doesn't just seem trustworthy, but actually is.
WriterGal is offline   Reply With Quote
grace slick's Avatar
grace slick grace slick is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 309

grace slick
Full Member
 
grace slick's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 309
mama
Old 05-29-2010, 04:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Do you work in the district in which your child goes? In my case toha get my daughter the help she needed I had to leave the district, and I am a special ed teacher. So I was really upset that the district didn't feel an educational need. That is the key word...Does your child require an educational need. If his behavior is the issue, they may look into a self-contained behavior program. One you better be prepared for if you presue it. Districts do not have 1:1aides in the regular classroom unless their is a severe physical problem. If your child requires a 1:1 they will remove him from the regular classroom because it is not in the best interest of the child to have a full time aide.
grace slick is offline   Reply With Quote
WriterGal WriterGal is offline
Junior Member
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 60

WriterGal
Junior Member
 
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 60
I don't think he needs a 1-1 aide...
Old 05-30-2010, 07:43 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

We had some testing done and I thought their suggestions were spot-on - resource room (i.e. pull-out by EC teacher) help to complete tasks, a retreat space for when he gets very worked up, reduced homework, or perhaps instead of extra enrichment (which seemed to be what homework was) sending home the incomplete work from the day, or even a 2nd copy so I could reinforce skills at home. He also needs a classroom that is highly structured, calm, and where the teacher has good classroom control - I think we made that point in the meeting, IEP or not.
He doesn't need self-contained.
And yes, I work in the district. Which maybe impacted what went down, but it also gives me resources in my own school that I can use to explain what's going on, and what's supposed to be going on.
WriterGal is offline   Reply With Quote
cvt's Avatar
cvt cvt is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 6,837

cvt
Senior Member
 
cvt's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 6,837
behavior problems
Old 05-30-2010, 09:08 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Look into a 504 plan, which requires teachers to accommodate students within the regular classroom setting.

In my district it has become virtually impossible to get an IEP and place students in a SpEd classroom unless the student has severe problems that keep them from learning. A 504 plan requires the general ed teacher to make specific accommodations, such as preferred seating, shortened assignments, oral tests and reports, and so on, depending on the child's needs.
cvt is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply
 
>
        Special Education

Home
Not a member? See the great features you're missing
Did you know? ProTeacher is a FREE service
Thread Tools



Problems?   ProTeacher Help | Town Hall

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:41 AM.

Copyright © ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
12