What do you expect of your ESL teacher? - ProTeacher Community





saclerk saclerk is offline
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What do you expect of your ESL teacher?
Old 05-26-2010, 04:28 PM
 
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I am switching from second grade to ESL next year and I wanted to know what you expect your ESL teacher to do and if they do push in what do they do in your room? Basically what does your current ESL teacher do?


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Old 05-26-2010, 04:37 PM
 
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That's funny; I was an ESL teacher who switched to second grade last year. I am hoping to find an ESL position this year. It's a lot of fun teaching language!
The model I prefer is pull-out. You just can't teach English Language Development properly in a push in. It seems like the push in programs aren't really for teaching ELD/ESL, they are more for support. There's also the matter of time. You can teach more students in pull-out than you can in the same amount of time with push in.
I know there will be others who see more value than I do in the push in, but we are all allowed to have different preferences.
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ESOL teacher
Old 05-26-2010, 04:46 PM
 
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Our ESOL teacher pushes into my classroom. I have her working with three ESOL students at a time (I have 6 ESOL students). Three are at grade level and three are below grade level. The teacher works with the below level students three times a week and the at level students two times a week. She pulls the students to a table in the back of the room and reviews vocabulary that we are discussing in our whole group and correlates with our core. I want her to work with the vocabulary because in ELL learners this is often a deficiency. I have made picture vocabulary cards for her. They have the word and a picture clue. Example thumb would have a picture of a thumb on it. I ask her to introduce five words a week. The first day of introducing the words she uses the picture word cards. The next time she uses the word cards without the pictures at first, if students still struggle she goes back to the picture card. Some of my students just don't have the schema for understanding some words. The second week the teacher reviews the previous five words and introduces five more using the picture cards as needed. The second part of her lesson is with phonetic patterns. She reviews the phonics skills of the week. I have set aside dry erase boards and letter tiles to use. She is free to create her own activities for this review. The third part of her lesson is doing a mini guided reading lesson. She works with one book for the entire week. I have her listen to the students read and stop periodically and clarify and discuss unknown concepts. This is the general outline of a push in ELL session in my 2nd grade classroom.
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AmberApple
Old 05-27-2010, 01:19 PM
 
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What you are describing is a paraprofessional, not an ELL teacher.
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Esl
Old 05-28-2010, 09:34 PM
 
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Mine is a Title One/??? teacher (she is supposed to work with the ELD teachers but I don't think she is a "real" ELD teacher). This year for me (I was 3rd grade, will be 2nd next year) she pulled 2 kids out and worked on their writing. She had 2 ELL's but a little over halfway through the year I switched it to 2 REALLY low English only students.

Then I had a Spanish Paraprofessional who when she was here pulled any number of students depending on who was there & what else was happening and she worked on basic grammar skills with them while I was doing Social Studies/Science or finishing math/LA.

If you want to know what I would want- the #1 thing would be a clearer understanding of what I should be looking for in terms of "is this an issue because the student speaks Spanish at home or is this an issue because the student doesn't get it?". I had quite a few Spanish only students who were REALLY high but would make some strange mistakes & I never knew why they did. The students could communicate with me perfectly & vice versa


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baileybear36
Old 06-04-2010, 01:21 PM
 
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baileybear36,

I did not describe what a paraprofessional does. I described what our ELL teacher does. I had to structure her lessons for her because otherwise they would have read a book about giraffes and then colored a picture of a giraffe. I have worked with other ELL teachers who push in and pull a small group and do guided reading and vocabulary activities as well. Why would you say this is only specific to paraprofessionals?
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AmberApple
Old 08-04-2010, 09:19 AM
 
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The fact that you kept saying "I have her do this" sends the message that you are the teacher and she is your assistant doing what you tell her to do. Perhaps she was just not a good teacher, so you felt the need to delegate to her, but that is not how an ideal push-in program works.
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MissESL MissESL is offline
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Old 11-01-2010, 10:20 AM
 
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I agree that AmberApple is describing a parapro. An ESL teacher is supposed to be highly qualified to be in the position you are in -- a regular teacher. She is capable of planning and carrying out lessons just like you do. YOU definitely seem to tend to treat him/her like an aidefor your classroom. The job of an ESL or ELL teacher is to work SPECIFICALLY WITH ESL STUDENT ONLY on English Language Arts and English acquisition.

I try to cover the areas liek they use on ACCESS:
We practice listening for information, listening skills, listening strategies.
We often read aloud, read idnependently, read-reread-reread aloud.
We practice vocab and comprehension questions.
We hold conversations daily.
We also write about once a week, and have grammar lessons.
NONE of this is related to their in class work in which way I am able to focus more specifically on strengths or weaknesses. But then, I'm pull out. I, too, find it is way more successful...and I don't get pushed around and treated like I'm less.
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