DO, IO, and subject complements - ProTeacher Community





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DO, IO, and subject complements
Old 12-05-2010, 11:35 AM
 
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Any creative ways to teach these? My students are struggling.


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Old 12-05-2010, 01:11 PM
 
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I teach these in French, not English, but the activity could apply either way. It is for identifying DOs and IOs, and replacing them with an appropriate pronoun. I call them "Human Sentences."

Initially, years ago, I used colored posterboard and cut it up. But then I discovered blank colored word wall cards at a teacher supply store, and I much prefer those. I use a different color of cards for each sentence, to keep them from getting mixed up. Each word in the sentence is written on its own card.

I typically do one sentence at a time, but you could have two groups going at the same time, each with different sentences. I pass out the words in the sentence --- in mixed up order ---randomly to different students. They have to get together and figure out the sentence and stand in order, each kid holding his card in front of him. One of the "audience" kids reads the sentence and determines if it makes sense.

Several sentences have both a DO phrase and an IO phrase. I decide which phrase I want them to replace and call out "OK...In this sentence we are replacing the [ Indirect Object ] phrase." The audience then has to decide which word-holding kids have to sit down ( the ones holding the IO phrase. ) If the sentence has only one kind of object phrase, the audience has to figure out which kind it is, as well as which words will be replaced. Then whomever I designated from the audience as "Mr. or Miss Pronoun" has to choose from the pronoun cards to replace the the IO or DO phrase with the appropriate IO or DO pronoun and gets to move into the right spot in the sentence with his pronoun card.

After they've read their sentence out loud and we've determined if it's correct or not, we start over with a new sentence and I try to flip-flop the roles of the kids ( audience and word-holders. )

I'm attaching the sentences I use. The directions are in English, but are aimed at my fellow French teachers, so disregard whatever does not apply to you.
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Old 12-05-2010, 01:33 PM
 
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As far as subject complements...if you're referring to predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives, I don't have a particular activity for that, although you could probably work some in in the human sentences. If you make the kids identify the function of certain words or phrases ( indicated by you ) in the human sentences, they could simply be identifying DOs, IOs, predicate nominatives, or predicate adjectives.

Although it's not an activity, I will say that for predicate nominatives, I use a visual of a scale to express that the predicate nominative is simply re-naming ( and therefore = to ) the subject. I draw a simple scale ( like a balanced see-saw ---a long line with a triangle fulcrum in the middle ) and I write the subject on the left side, and the predicate nominative on the right side. Whenever we talk about predicate nominatives, I at least use my hands to indicate a scale balancing to remind them, even if I'm not using the written visual every time.

For sentences with a predicate adjective, I draw an arched arrow over the top of the sentence back from the predicate adj to the subject, and another arched one under the sentence from the subject to the predicate adj., to show that they are linked and refer to each other. ( It looks like a circle with arrows going counter-clockwise. ) Whenever I need to make a visual cue with my hands, I draw a counter-clockwise circle, and pause at the halfway marks, to remind them of the arrows.

I'm attaching a practice worksheet.

Last edited by Mme Escargot; 12-05-2010 at 01:53 PM.. Reason: Forgot to add the attachment
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mrshunts2010 mrshunts2010 is offline
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thank you
Old 12-05-2010, 04:23 PM
 
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Thanks! I think my students would enjoy this activity! I might try it tomorrow!
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