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lilybeth lilybeth is offline
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detailed lesson plans
Old 02-24-2007, 10:51 PM
 
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I work as a part-time preschool teacher and go to college majoring in elementary education. I am now finally taking all education classes. Anyway, I haven't done lesson plans before since previous semesters I was taking classes in the core curriculm.
Well in one of my classes we are learning how to do detailed lesson plans. Our professor told us this is the layout that we will have to do lesson plans once we get into our methods and student teaching and we will have to do several of these detailed lesson plans once we are in our field-based schools. I don't know if its because I've never done lesson plans before, but to me this is just too detailed. I just can't imagine if I am teaching reading, science, social studies, and math doing this detailed lesson plan for every single subject. To me its too time consuming, and I think you should have lesson plans but just not this detailed. The layout of the lesson plans goes like this: And under every heading it says "to describe in detail".

Objective
Rationale
Prerequisite Skills
Assessment
Materials
Transitional Activity
Focus
Connections
Instruction
Closure
Modifications


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plans
Old 02-25-2007, 12:21 AM
 
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That will for sure be how you'll be doing lesson plans in class and in student teaching. Doing them in that format will be a hoop you'll have to jump through to graduate, so may as well learn from it.

When you head into your teaching career, your administration will have their own guidelines and expectations. But, especially in the first few years, your admin will also want to know for sure that you know your curriculum and are covering it. So he/she will want to look at your long and short term planning for that proof. Most of that list you mentioned will need to be an implicit part of that planning at least for a while, though maybe not in so much detail. You'll be glad you did the detail while you have time.

In a few years, you'll be able to do a point form, shorter lesson plan. after you know your curriculum is covered, needed adaptations are second nature, you are always clear on your lesson's objective, and you build in assessment of your lesson's success. But these detailed lessons are a necessary first step.
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Mr. C Mr. C is offline
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Old 03-03-2007, 11:50 AM
 
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Yes... I, too, have been my college class that introduced this layout for lesson plans and was told that this format would be used in my methods classes. For my university, that was not true--each instructor had her own lesson plan format to follow (some were more complicated than yours!!!). Anyway, the important thing is that I am glad we had to type lesson plans using that format. In my local districts, you will never have to type those long plans; however, when you do plan lessons, your brain will automatically think about these items without having to write them down step-by-step by having these classes. In fact, one of my cooperating teachers had a lesson plan book with a couple of words (not even a complete sentence) for each subject of the day (6th grade Elementary). She said she had plenty of training in Madeline Hunter's lesson plan format, but at this point in her career it would be senseless to write all of her daily plans out using that format.
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vjlm86 vjlm86 is offline
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Old 03-22-2007, 05:57 PM
 
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Hi! I am a junior in college, and I also have to write detailed lesson plans. I do think that the lesson plans I have to write are to detailed too. I do not have to include as much as you do, but I do have to include alot. I know that when I start teaching I won't write detailed lesson plans like that ones I write in college, but I do think they will help me in my first year of teaching. I think that writing detailed lesson plans are good for first year teachers because it gives them a guide. Just think when you are done college you won't have to write such detailed lesson plans for every lesson plan you have to write.
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dee dee is offline
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There's a reason....
Old 03-23-2007, 01:49 AM
 
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You have to know what you're doing and WHY you're doing what you're doing.

When I was going through my student teachings, I was frustrated, but then someone said that you have to write the plans as though you are having someone substituting for you who knows nothing about teaching. That helped me understand the WHAT part.

Then my mom (yes, my mom) told me that they have to be so detailed so the professors know that you can apply what you have learned.

It's a lot of work, but it truly does help with understanding the process. Now when I have to do plans, it's easy. And no, most schools don't need them that detailed in the "real world," but that's not why you are doing them anyway.


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