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Serious consequences for disrespectful students.

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Serious consequences for disrespectful students.
Old 11-10-2011, 02:45 PM
 
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I need help ASAP! My students are very disrespectful and are constantly misbehaving. They donít listen and they donít take my serious. I try to teach but itís like Iím just dancing around begging someone to listen to me. My administration is no help. I have to ďproblem solveĒ as I am told. This is my first year in second grade (2 year teaching) and I feel like the kids are winning the battle. I have some students that will not move or completely shut down if given a redirection or to do something they do not want to do. Since they are not touching another student then administration will not intervene. However, since itís just the student acting out and trying to get attention they cause all kind of noise and start talking while Iím talking and whatever else they can do to just be disrespectful. We do not have a disciplinary policy at our school and my principal does not believe in suspension (I work at a charter school). I am in need of help. Iíve already lost one student. His father said that the behavior is too much and he canít learn. If the principal doesnít want to aid in the solution then heís taking his child to another school. I feel like quitting because I donít know how much more I can take. Please help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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Oh Wow!!
Old 11-10-2011, 05:46 PM
 
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I am so--- sorry!!!

Have you read Teaching with Love and Logic? We use this model at our school and I have found that it is really helpful. We have a code for behaviors and the students make what their behavior was on a card. Then we have a "Fun Friday" if you have to many below the lines then you are not allowed to participate and go to study hall where you write a fix it plan.

This might not work for you, but you could
1. Have the kids be accountable for their behavior by marking a card that the parents sign (or maybe you hold the cards for the day)...remember to try to mark good and bad (above and below the line)

2. Celebrate the great weeks...sticker, call home, nice note...

3. Have the students think of a "fix-it" and follow through


For my chatty class we have a "gumball machine" where as a class we earn a free prize like "no shoes" "10 extra mins reccess" when the machine is full.

Another idea...start with a morning meeting and talk about the behavior...meet after centers and talk about what work and what did not. Think about the Morning Meeting book or The First Six Weeks of School starting your routine next year.

Finally maybe look into the book Bucket Fillers and get a sand bucket and have the students fill the bucket and share at morning meeting...also talk about "bucket dippers"


I hope that some of those ideas help and that your year gets better.
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behavior
Old 11-10-2011, 07:04 PM
 
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I use a stoplight system in my classroom. I keep my stoplight with clothespins hanging inside a closet so it is not visible to everyone. I keep a clipboard with a list of everyones names. If I have to warn them about anything, then it is a check on my clipboard. If I have to say something to them again, then they must move their clothespin from green to yellow on my stoplight. I will warn again before moving their clothespin to red. Then students have one more warning before their clothespin moves to blue. This system works for me because I am keeping track of warnings and clothespin changes on my clipboard. I still think the students need to move a clothespin so that they know their behavior isn't up to par. My students keep a calendar for the month in their homework folders. They color the day according to their clothespin. Parents have to initial the square every night so they know to always look for this. The colors mean yellow=5 thinking laps at recess, red= 10 Thinking Laps at recess and a note home, blue= 10 Thinking laps at recess + phone call home. I even keep track of their laps. Every time they do a lap they must collect a plastic link from me. This will let me know how many laps they have done without me standing around counting them.
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My goodness
Old 11-11-2011, 09:27 AM
 
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I am so sorry yellowpouncy-

I just posted a response under THE VENT about my behavior system in my class. I have been in your shoes. I have taught in the trenches and I have had the ideal class. I wish I had known about this behavior system my first year teaching-10 years ago. I have not raised my voice one time this year-it has changed my classroom and me. I don't make a habit of raising my voice, BTW, but I would be lying if I said I HAVE NEVER RAISED MY VOICE AS A TEACHER IN 10 YEARS. Do not QUIT-you can do this. You have to empower your students in another way. You have to channel their energy for the sake of learning.

I can say and I try to be open minded and appreciate the ideas of fellow teachers but if a teacher made my child walk laps for misbehavior I would be so very upset. The parents at my school would have my HIDE on their living room wall. I would make the 6 o'clock news in my district-WOW!
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Procedures practice
Old 11-11-2011, 02:23 PM
 
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My class had started asking me everything, telling me "I'm done" although the next activity was listed on the board, not following directions the 1st time etc so we had a day where we practiced procedures again. It took time away from instruction but it saved me so much more time in the end. We practiced moving 'quickly and quietly' to the carpet and returning to seats. We practiced entering the room as though it was the beginning of the day and reading the day's morning work from the whiteboard. When one child brought me their work and said "I'm done" we stopped and returned to the carpet, talked about it, and practiced again. It took 15 TRIES but we finally got through "FIRST: write one sentence with the word veteran NEXT: go on xtramath THEN: do unfinished work LAST: read."

I told them that if they start back chasing me around the room next week or asking me the things that we have done for 53 days, we'll practice procedures the entire day. And I mean it, we will.


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Whole Brain Teaching and Clip Chart
Old 11-12-2011, 06:55 AM
 
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Here are a couple of strategies I have used with challenging classes in the past. Honestly the Whole Brain Teaching sounds a little "out there" but it really does work. The strategies are active and the sometimes noisy. You have to be ready to move and be on your shoes. Kids that are talkative and active are able to channel all of that energy in a positive direction and they can't help but have fun. It is hard to ignore having fun. Active engagement definitely improves.
Here is a link to their website. They have a lot of strategies.
whole brain teaching dot com (with no www in front and no spaces)This one does not come up as a link for some reason.

The other strategy that is a bit calmer for teachers, is the clip chart. The difference between this chart and the one above is that it has more steps in the positive direction than the negative. It helps me to focus on students who are modeling positive behaviors. There are consequences for students not ready to learn but not near as strict as the ones listed above. This one is on the New Management website. Will include a link to the ebook about the clip chart, but again there are a lot of free tips on their main website.
http://www.newmanagement.com/ebooks/...hart_ebook.pdf

Christine Bainbridge does an outstanding job of explaining how the clipchart system works in a second grade classroom on her blog with links to her website.
http://bainbridgeclass.blogspot.com/...-overview.html

I hope these resources help! You already have one third of the year completed. These classes do move on, and luckily so do unsupportive administrators.

Last edited by vana; 11-12-2011 at 06:59 AM.. Reason: error in web address
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Old 11-12-2011, 08:23 AM
 
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I had a class like yours last year. I spent every night and week-end crying and trying to come up with activities that would help. Nothing helped, it was the combination of the kids. It was my worst year in 26 years of teaching. There is a book called "Teach like a Champion" it has some really good techniques for classroom behavior. I am not sure who the author is. Good luck!
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