Multiplication Mini-Lesson - ProTeacher Community





crackerjill's Avatar
crackerjill crackerjill is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540

crackerjill
Senior Member
 
crackerjill's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540
Multiplication Mini-Lesson
Old 05-12-2012, 01:56 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

As I posted earlier this week, I have an interview Monday in which they would like me to teach a 4th grade math lesson. I called them to find out which domain they wanted me to teach, and they said choose one.

I chose Operations and Algebraic Thinking, and I'm teaching Standard 1:
Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35=5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.

I'm going to borrow the AWESOME math journal idea from Jen Runde and create THIS interactive math journal page with the students.

I've attached my lesson plan if anyone wants to check it out/ critique it! I'm totally welcome to constructive criticism, I've never taught 4th grade before, so I'm excited to try something new!


Attached Files
File Type: docx Multiplication Mini- Lesson.docx (144.9 KB, 392 views)
crackerjill is offline   Reply With Quote


mom23kids's Avatar
mom23kids mom23kids is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,886

mom23kids
Senior Member
 
mom23kids's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 6,886
Suggestion
Old 05-12-2012, 07:41 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I hope you don't mind the following suggestions:
The lesson sounds really good. I just wonder why you're using such large numbers. I think it may take too long modeling each one only because the numbers are so large. Can you use s/t like 12x6=

Anyway at the end of the lesson I would add a SHARE:

I'd ask them:
  • How can we connect this to real life? When would you actually use this?
  • Why is the strategy you chose better than another one for you?
  • What profession may use this kind of math?
  • I might also give a compliment after the child explains and ask the class if they have a compliment for him/her too.
  • I would also give a math word problem so they could apply what they just learned.
Just some higher level questions that you might want to add at the end.
mom23kids is offline   Reply With Quote
crackerjill's Avatar
crackerjill crackerjill is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540

crackerjill
Senior Member
 
crackerjill's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540

Old 05-12-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I chose the larger numbers to model the placeholder 0, I wanted to use two 2 digit numbers. (I did think about the time issue, but I feel like modeling the steps is more important?) I only have 20 minutes to teach though, so maybe you are right....

I LOVE the share idea! I'll definitely add that!
crackerjill is offline   Reply With Quote
read2lead read2lead is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 169

read2lead
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 169
Too much!
Old 05-12-2012, 07:49 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

You asked for constructive criticism, so here it goes...

Your lesson is FAR from being "mini" and isn't really focused on the standard. Your lesson focuses on the many different strategies for solving a multiplication problem. If teaching kids how to multiply is the goal, please know that you can't teach all of those strategies in one week, let alone one lesson. Pick ONE strategy and stick with it. Your strategies are good ones, but I spend weeks teaching them. And know that two-digit by two-digit multiplication is a different standard.

If you are just introducing this standard, multiplicative comparison, the kids kids should already have some background in the concept of multiplication. Multiplicative comparison problems would be something like, "Paul planted a flower that was 3 inches tall. Mary planted a flower that was 4 times as tall as Paul's. How tall is Mary's flower?"

Here is a mini-lesson idea:

You could start the lesson with a pre-assessment by posting this word problem. Give students 5 minutes to work on the problem. Work the room and make observations of the strategies students are using. After time ends, ask students to share their answers. Accept all answers and write them on the board. Then have students share their strategies. If the strategy works, record it on an anchor chart.

Afterwards, share another problem like, "Lenny and Carl were making Lego towers during playtime. Lenny built a tower that was 4 Legos high. Carl's tower was 5 times as high. How many Legos were in Carl's tower?" Give students Legos or connecting cubes. Have students build a tower like Lenny's (4 cubes). Ask, "What does 'five times as high' mean?" It means that it is five times the 4 cube tower. Have them make five towers of four and show them that it is 5 times as many as 4. Put them together and count the cubes to find 4 x 5 = 20. Have them illustrate what they did in their math journal.

Let students practice with a similar problem. In following lessons, you would introduce other multiplicative comparison problems but only allow students that need extra support to use the manipulatives.

I really hope you get the job, it seems like it is really important to you. Hopefully my advice is helpful. You certainly don't want to overwhelm them by making a lesson long and complex, especially if it's supposed to me "mini." Best of luck!
read2lead is offline   Reply With Quote
vttraveler's Avatar
vttraveler vttraveler is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,834

vttraveler
Senior Member
 
vttraveler's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,834

Old 05-12-2012, 08:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I agree that there is too much here. I also question if this lesson is appropriate for the end of 4th grade. I teach many of these strategies in 3rd grade and at our school double digit multiplication is covered at the beginning of the year in 4th grade. At the end, they are mainly concentrating on division. Can you ask the teacher what they are working on currently?

I do an activity where I give the students a problem and they solve it and then they pair share and record each others problem. Then I walk around the room and choose 4 students who have used different strategies to come up to the board and demonstrate their strategy to the class. Finally, I record the strategies from the board on chart paper, so students can refer back to them.


vttraveler is offline   Reply With Quote
read2lead read2lead is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 169

read2lead
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 169
yes
Old 05-13-2012, 04:42 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

According to the new CCSS, the single-digit multiplication strategies are taught in third. Because we fully adopted the standards this year, there was a gap and we had to spend a lot of time teaching multiplication strategies before we could move forward with the new standards. We had the same problem with fractions. 4.OA.1 and 2 is all about multiplicative comparison.

4.NBT.5 - Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

The key phrase in 4.NBT.5 is "based on place value." We interpreted this as the distributive property... breaking the numbers into their value. The standard algorithm (the way you first describe in your lesson) is a 5th grade CCSS. (5.NBT.5. Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm)
read2lead is offline   Reply With Quote
crackerjill's Avatar
crackerjill crackerjill is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540

crackerjill
Senior Member
 
crackerjill's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540

Old 05-13-2012, 07:55 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Thanks for the great input! I did decide to change the lesson to more closely match the standard. Here is the new lesson attached. I'll also attach the worksheet I made to use with it! Let me know what you think of this new idea!
Attached Files
File Type: docx other mult as a comparison.docx (145.5 KB, 209 views)
crackerjill is offline   Reply With Quote
crackerjill's Avatar
crackerjill crackerjill is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540

crackerjill
Senior Member
 
crackerjill's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,540

Old 05-13-2012, 07:55 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Here is my "flip-flop multiplication" worksheet!
Attached Files
File Type: docx flip flop multiplication.docx (92.2 KB, 250 views)
crackerjill is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Fourth Grade
Thread Tools



Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:40 AM.

Copyright © 2014 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
7