guided reading for dummies - ProTeacher Community




      
Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      ARCHIVE


guided reading for dummies

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
anon4this
 
 
Guest

anon4this
 
 
Guest
guided reading for dummies
Old 06-25-2007, 10:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Seeing a Guided Reading Diva...

ok, here's my problem...

I teach a 4th/5th grade multiage class. This year we are switching to Making Meaning for reading instruction. We are still expected to deliver guided reading for small groups. Ok, before people throw Fountas and Pinell, Debbie Miller, Daily Five, etc at me I'll say I do have experience with Reading Workshop. I know what guided reading is supposed to be about. My issue is with planning. I'm overwhelmed with stuff. I have gobs of books and magazines I've purchased, hoping I find the magic secret to planning effective GR lessons. My students have DRA scores, so I know how to group them.
Seems to me there should be an easy way to come up with lessons, I'm not sure what my question is here, I just want someone to tell me exactly how they plan. What do you consider, how do you pick the material, what does a lesson look like?
Also, where do you get ideas for skills to use? Do ya just pull them out of your ears? I need something systematic. I realize all readers won't be the same, but I need some structure to my planning.
I'd love to hear what people have to say...


  Reply With Quote

Kat's Mom's Avatar
Kat's Mom Kat's Mom is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,549
Senior Member

Kat's Mom
 
Kat's Mom's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,549
Senior Member
Good question...
Old 06-26-2007, 03:25 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Dear anon4this,

I can't offer too much help, but just wanted to say I empathize with your frustration here. I feel like the actual guided reading lesson, especially for intermediate grades, is a very elusive, mystical thing. Research I've searched on the internet and in many resource books, focuses on primary guided reading templates. I agree, intermediate guided reading lessons, especially when having to plan for 4-5 a week, feels like something I have to pull out of my ear a lot!
Trying to help some, as for materials, I like using chapter books for guided reading, because then I'm not scrambling to find new materials every week; it lasts me a while. I also copy magazine articles out of magazines, such a Cricket and Highlights, to use as materials. I am also lucky enough to have leveled sets of tradebooks that came with my basal set. If you don't have a subscription, Readinga-z.com does have printable, levelled readers on their website WITH some worksheets to accompany each book so you've got SOMETHING to work with, and the books are decent, plus short enough to read in one or two sittings.
I concentrate on fluency a lot when doing guided reading groups. I often "assign" 3-4 pgs. in the book for ea. kid at the table to preread/practice, and then we go around the table, sharing the book orally by the pages assigned. I often do running records while the kids read their pages. Sometimes, I will have them read the book silently, and I give them 5-6 multiple choice, "test-like" questions to answer, where they have to mark the pg. number of where to find that answer in the book. We then go over together after. Sometimes after reading together, I have them reread the book with a partner.
Like you, I hope some other posters give you some "meaty" tips on how to plan a guided reading lesson. I agree, being given yet another book title to check is not what I need. I want to actually hear exactly what others are doing...
Kat's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
mel's Avatar
mel mel is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 538
Senior Member

mel
 
mel's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 538
Senior Member
teach 3rd and struggling with it
Old 06-26-2007, 05:14 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I teach third and I am still struggling with it. I can't get it to work! My biggest problem is what to do with the rest of the students while you are working with a group. It seems like you would have to manage and plan a lot of different stuff for the kids to do. PLEASE HELP!!!!!
mel is offline   Reply With Quote
Karyn3rd's Avatar
Karyn3rd Karyn3rd is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 744
Senior Member

Karyn3rd
 
Karyn3rd's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 744
Senior Member
not an expert
Old 06-26-2007, 05:41 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Hi Mel,

I am not an expert but I felt really good about the way Reader's Workshop went last year in my third grade classroom. I spent the first three weeks really working with the children about what Reader's Workshop looks like, sounds like, and feels like. If you have access to the book Guiding Readers and Writers I would pick that up. This is a HUGE book. The first year I bought it I focused on reading the section entitled "The First 20 Days". This really helped me get the children to understand exactly what they will do during the Reading Block and specifically during Guided Reading. I schedule a 40 minute Guided Reading block each day. I have typically had four groups and meet with two groups each day. While I am workign with Guided Reading groups the other children are practicing independent reading.

Students are given about 15 minutes to "shop" for books in our classroom library on Monday. They are encouraged to choose between 5-8 books. Sometimes I will find an article or two that I think the children will enjoy and make copies for them to keep in their book bags along with their independent reading books. They will keep these books all week. Each day during Guided Reading that week students know to get their book bags that hold their Independent Reading books, their reading notebook, find a quiet place and get to reading. This is one of the only times during the day that students may not get up, may not go to the restroom, may not get a drink, nada. they are solely focused on reading, reading, and more reading.

Hope that helps.

Karyn
Karyn3rd is offline   Reply With Quote
shazam shazam is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,074
Senior Member

shazam
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,074
Senior Member
guided reading
Old 06-26-2007, 04:47 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

From what I understand, guided reading is basically directing students through the text and teaching them what good readers do so that when it comes to read independently, they know what to do. I see it as giving them tools to unlock comprehension so they can see what successful reading feels like.

For the skills to focus on, I build on whatever skills I taught whole group, and I find out what specifically students need to work on. The materials need to be on their instructional level--not too easy, not too hard, so that will vary based on each group, but sometimes I use the same text with all groups and provide more scaffolding for students who need it. The actual teaching of the skill is really short though, just a few minutes while I introduce the book. I think the best thing for improving reading skills is time spent reading appropriate texts.

You can do guided reading with a variety of texts. I use the small books that come with my basal series, trade books, content textbooks, and articles from Time for Kids. I don't know if I do it right or not, but I feel like it was successful with my third graders this year. What I do is:

1) introduce the text--picture walk, look at text features, make predictions with the kids, give a short idea about the story, build background knowledge, teach new vocabulary words (not all of these for each text, it just depends on what the text requires and what the students need to understand) *also, it is important to set a purpose here...if it is a short book, maybe ask a question or have them think about why a character is like another character or something like that based on the skills you are teaching, or if it is a chapter or part of a textbook, have them read to find out what causes erosion or something like that.

2) have students whisper read--I think this really benefits the students because when they are whisper reading in the group, we know that they are not fake reading, and studies show that the more actual reading students do the better readers they become. At first, they try to make it a race, but I have them continue reading over and over when they finish for fluency. I continually remind them that sometimes good readers read texts over and over to help understand it better.

3) while they whisper read, I go to each student and have them read a little louder to me. This is the most important part (in my opinion) because I can see what strategies students are using, and I can immediately correct, give cues, and help them apply strategies that we are learning in class. During this time, I get ideas on skills to teach directly to groups or the class based on what students struggle with.

4) after everyone has had a chance to read to me and read the text at least once, I have some kind of discussion about the text where they have to use the text to answer questions or make comments.

As for what the other students are doing, we are required to do literacy centers, so I make sure they are centers with tasks that require the students to actually read such as poetry, leap pads, reader's theater, computer programs.



Last edited by shazam; 06-26-2007 at 04:55 PM..
shazam is offline   Reply With Quote
cachilders's Avatar
cachilders cachilders is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 285
Full Member

cachilders
 
cachilders's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 285
Full Member
Do you have to use basals in your school?
Old 06-27-2007, 09:29 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Silvercat,

Your plan was very helpful and interesting. I'm still struggling with a schedule that will work for those of us expected to use the basals. Do you use the skills and strategies that are the weekly focus in your basal text?
cachilders is offline   Reply With Quote
daisiemazie daisiemazie is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 28
New Member

daisiemazie
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 28
New Member
Guided Reading
Old 06-27-2007, 03:56 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I am by no means an expert and having said that I will share what I learned in a GR workshop this summer and that was to keep it simple. The suggestions that Silvercat shared are terrific. Much of what she said in her post are things that I learned in the workshop. We were told to start slow and be sure that each student knew what they were to do when they were at the lit.centers and most important that the lit. centers are not a given and if the students could not behave then they lost the opportunity to go to the centers. If this happened then they returned to their seats for a ton of seatwork. We were assured that it did not take many times for this to happen before the entire class knew how to behave during center time.
daisiemazie is offline   Reply With Quote
shazam shazam is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,074
Senior Member

shazam
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,074
Senior Member

Old 06-27-2007, 06:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Yes, we have to use basals. I use the basal during whole group for about 25-30 minutes to start off. Then we break into small groups for 45 or so minutes. I usually use the skills from the basal during guided reading, which I do with small groups. Hope that helps.
shazam is offline   Reply With Quote
Boo Boo is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 9
New Member

Boo
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 9
New Member
Anon4this
Old 08-09-2007, 08:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

I can totally relate to your post! I switched to third grade 2 years ago(from prior kindergarten for 2 years and misc. special ed. before that).
I spent my first summer reading Fountas and Pinell, among other texts, and feeling completely overwhelmed. I'm torn between our Scholastic program, novel units, lit circles, and guided reading groups. The planning and flexibility required floors me. I keep plugging along and am going to try to do more guided reading grouping this year. I am going to try using lesson plan ideas from some scholastic teacher books I purchased. I can't recall exact titles(I just moved and they are boxed right now), but they contain minilessons for comprehension strategies, etc. I say trying that format is better than simply teaching everything through novel packet questions. If you hear of any good lesson books, let me know. There is so much out there, and I would love to hear about something that actually works and is manageable!

-Boo
Boo is offline   Reply With Quote
DSTOSA
 
 
Guest

DSTOSA
 
 
Guest
teacher
Old 06-11-2009, 11:47 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I, too, struggled with guided reading for years and it all came together for me when our district switched to Making Meaning. As you said, how to group kids was not the issue. Whatever skill we were working on in Making Meaning was the skill I had my "book clubs" (AKA guided reading groups) work on. If we were working on "wondering and questioning" then that's what book clubs worked on. At the beginning of each book club session-which we did 3 times a week- I would let the kids know what skill they should work on. I would rotate around the room and listen in on discussions. Then, whenever I came to a lesson in Making Meaning that had the children independently practice a skill, I just skipped the lesson since we were already doing it in book clubs. Good Luck.


  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
ARCHIVE
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:01 AM.


Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net