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Ms. Purple Ms. Purple is offline
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Ms. Purple
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Discipline without Stress, Punishment, or Rewards
Old 08-05-2013, 08:46 AM
 
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Has anyone else read this book and/or implemented the program? A fellow PTer recommended this book, so I read it this summer. I am actually not through with it yet. I really love and agree with a lot of the points in the book. But I'm nervous to try it - it's completely different from anything I've ever used. Also we are a PBIS school, so that seems kind of opposite. Most of the teachers give out some kind of "tickets" that the students accumulate and eventually trade in for privileges. We also have a school-wide system. I feel like this program would have to be school-wide in order to work. Otherwise I'd be the teacher where the kids don't "get anything".

Anyway, does the program really work? Do the kids really buy into it? Do they miss the "rewards/privileges"? Some of the rewards I used to use were sit in the teacher's chair/write with a gel pen/show and tell, etc. Is there a way to still incorporate this into my classroom? The kids did enjoy it. I just really need some advice. I'm very confused and stressed about whether to try this new program or if I can just incorporate some of the principles (like the hierarchy). Help please!


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bellringer bellringer is offline
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dws
Old 08-05-2013, 09:48 AM
 
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Here is a recent discussion about this.

http://www.proteacher.net/discussion...10#post3409210

You can still have "celebrations" with the gel pens, show and tell, etc to celebrate the great things that are happening. I think the difference is that with rewards, students are told, "Do this, and I will give you the reward." Celebrations are "Wow, because this great thing happened, we will celebrate."

Good luck as you proceed.
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We are also a PBIS school...
Old 08-05-2013, 10:06 AM
 
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But I don't believe in rewarding expected behavior. I leave a "ticket" on everyone's desk in the morning for coming to school to do their job. That way they can still trade the tickets for "goodies" and not feel cheated or left out. (Occasionally, I will give a ticket for exceptional, above-and-beyond behavior.)

I do use special rewards to celebrate academic achievement and academic excellence.

The behavior in my room is typically pretty good. My kids don't miss the behavior rewards. (In fact, many tell me they get more "tickets" my way than they ever got before.)

Good luck with whatever system you decide is best for you!
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JulAsif JulAsif is offline
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I found
Old 08-05-2013, 10:30 AM
 
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it is much easier to implement if it is a school-wide plan. We use CHAMPS, and have school incentives/rewards, so it was really hard for me to do this. I definitely like the idea behind it.
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:16 PM
 
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I read the book last year too and really liked the idea so I switched to the following...I used the ladder clip chart and if they got to the top they got a little like 3x5 piece of paper that said "I had an outstanding day!" I passed these out at the end of the day and said, "Thank you for having an outstanding day." That's it, I got rid of all other rewards and it was the best year I have ever had as far as behavior. Of course in the beginning of the year I did talk a lot about expectations, but I plan to do the same this year!


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love this book
Old 08-05-2013, 04:50 PM
 
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The whole premise of rewarding children for dong what they should be doing is ridiculous. Rewards never work long term and do nothing to teach personal responsibility. You can still do "fun" things- just don't tie them to anything. Let them write with gel pens because you feel like it!
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Old 08-06-2013, 05:41 AM
 
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I use it in my low-income 100% free lunch first grade, and I love it. There is a pro and originator of the idea (I think her user name is cvolteacher/Kerry Weisner) who will probably jump in and comment on this thread - She is a great resource having used it for many years, and is always very helpful and responsive with questions.

I started using it in a PBIS school because I felt like I had gone from teacher to ticket-lady. I couldn't reward the kids who were always behaving fast enough, and the kids who didn't always behave were getting tickets for silly things like lining up that the other kids always did correctly anyway. It didn't feel fair that Joey got a ticket for lining up correctly on day 120 when Susie had been doing it correctly all year (kind of like if my teaching partner got a bonus for figuring out guided reading in May when I had been doing it with great results all year without the bonus or for the same one). Plus, when I did try to reward all my Susies, all I did was pass out tickets or chart points all day. I noticed the 'bad' kids were disinterested once they got to redeem their tickets and realized that the 'good' kids could get more or better things than them anyway. My biggest struggle was that the 'bad' kids thought of themselves as 'bad' kids, and so did the 'good' kids. The 'bad' kids lived up to their expectations of themselves - Of course I have to sit out at recess, I'm going to have to anyway so why bother trying? I wanted them to stop thinking of themselves as the kid who was always in trouble.

Your questions:

I feel like this program would have to be school-wide in order to work. Otherwise I'd be the teacher where the kids don't "get anything". - It would be easier school wide, but for me it's not. I find other ways to invest kids in the classroom, like tracking their sight word progress on the walls so they're motivated to stay focused while practicing, or timing their math drills (quietest 2 minutes of the day!), or rewarding them for working so hard while I individually test students by 'just deciding' to take them out to recess 5 minutes early. If they get tickets from the specialist teachers, great! We talk about the fun things we've done (that science experiment was SO COOL!) so that when the other kids on the bus whip out their bouncy balls, mine have something they feel good about too. Plus, their 'normal' is the 6 hours they're with me, and that's what's on their mind. They're not sitting there missing tickets - That might happen for 10 minutes on the bus, but oh well, that's just not what we do in our room.

Anyway, does the program really work? - As long as I work REALLY hard not to just snap at them with a consequence, which was my previous go-to (Flip a card! Move your clip! 5 minutes of recess!). If I focus on keeping it working, it works. I put a big poster with my teacher questions on the back wall where I'm always facing to remind me

Do the kids really buy into it? - YES. After a week or two of explaining and practicing and finding examples in books and our classroom, they use the language unprompted. They need a LOT of demoing, since it's a new way of thinking, and they need strategies and practice solving problems. You have to give them scripts for what to do if they want/need something from another kid (to stop hitting, to give a pencil back, etc.) so they revert to that instead of hitting, grabbing, bad language, tattling, etc. We talk about what each level looks like in the cafeteria, in the hall, lining up, on the carpet, in math...It's a lot of up front work for a big payoff. My favorite was the retained 'bad kid' who threw massive kicking screaming temper tantrums multiple times a day until February, who said on the last day, "Ms. __, I used to make bad choices but now I can change them to good ones." It takes a LONG time, but those are exactly the kids who need it.

Do they miss the "rewards/privileges"? - I think they would if they were older and more conditioned to receiving them, or if I used rewards and then took them away, but I start the year this way so it is the 'normal' of their new teacher and new classroom. Like I said, I work in fun stuff in other ways and then we talk about what was fun so they can identify it. Plus, I teach them to identify the behaviors they're proud of: "Wow, you were so quiet in the hallway that the kindergarteners didn't even look up when you passed! You helped them learn, and you gave them a great example to follow. What level would that be? Why? How did you feel when you worked together that way? Give each other a thumbs up!" Or "Joey, I noticed that when Susie dropped her pencil case, you just bent over to help and she didn't even ask you to. What level was that choice? Why? What did it feel like when you did that?" I'm explicitly teaching intrinsic rewards in the same way that I implicitly teach phonics.

Some of the rewards I used to use were sit in the teacher's chair/write with a gel pen/show and tell, etc. Is there a way to still incorporate this into my classroom? - Yes, just do it! Have a 'gel pen' day for Tuesday spelling word practice, or set up a system where 5 kids use them all day Mon, 5 kids Tues, etc. Work it into your plans so that it builds investment instead of rewarding behaviors.
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