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color card system for behavior
Old 07-21-2007, 07:31 AM
 
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I am thinking of using the color card system as a visual for student discipline. Does anyone still use this system with third grade? If so, what are your consequences? Thanks, Tasha


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I use tags not cards but..
Old 07-21-2007, 09:10 AM
 
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I do it the same way. I found it easier to buy tags at wal-mart and put different colors on them. I have white smiley faces..everyone starts with, green..warning (no consequences), blue..(miss part of recess) red..(all recess or detention which is during recess but they must stay inside and work on something) the consequence is determined by me and the reasons the other tags were pulled. If they pull all tags then they must go to office or go to 3 days of detention. We have a fun day at the end of school and if you have not been sent to the office or not gone to detention more than 3 times you get to participate.

I move the tags back each day. I also give the kids who stay on the smiley face a ticket to put their name on and at the end of the week I draw 3 peoples names out and they get to pick out of my treasure box.

Hope this helps
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color card
Old 07-21-2007, 09:22 AM
 
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I do colored apples I've cut from our schools die cut machine.

THE APPLE CHART:
All students start out on a red apple each week. Every time a student chooses to misbehave, the student will have to remove one apple from the behavior chart.

1. Red apple (no apples removed) The student will receive teacher recognition, a snack break each day and puzzles and games on Friday.

2. Green apple (one apple removed) This is considered a warning. I will remind the student of our rules.

3. Yellow apple (two apples removed) The student will not be allowed to participate in puzzles and games on Friday.

4. Brown apple (three apples removed) The student will miss break and parents will be notified. (still no puzzles and games)

5. All apples removed- The student will be sent to the office with a discipline referral. (still no puzzles and games)

At anytime the students or myself can look at the chart and see who will not be going to break or on Friday who will not be able to play with the puzzles and games.
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Old 07-21-2007, 09:27 AM
 
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I LOVE using the color card system. Here's mine: everyone starts off each morning green. Yellow-they owe me 5 minutes of recess. Orange-they owe me the whole recess. Red- they owe me 2 recess plus a note/phone call home. Usually when a student turns red (if it's not for like a fight, etc) I'll have the STUDENT write the note home to his/her parents explaining exactly what happened. I sign it, the parents have to sign it, and then it needs to be brought back to me the next day. If the students don't bring it back, then they owe me EVERY recess until I get it back. It's worked out well so far.
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no lunch recess
Old 07-21-2007, 10:17 AM
 
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does anyone have a consequence other than to take away recess. My students only have 5 minutes for recess before going to lunch. That is their only recess for the day. I am not the one to pick them up and take them to lunch. I have given the person that picks up the students before lunch, a list of the students that need to sit during lunch recess. The substitute coach would usually ignore the list that I gave him and let all the kids play. The kids have told me that the coach told them not to tell me that everyone got to play at lunch recess. Any other ideas?


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stop light behavior chart
Old 07-21-2007, 10:42 AM
 
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I use green, yellow, red on a pocket chart with their names on it. If they go to yellow , they have a chance for reversal by the end of the day. If they go to red, they stay there all day and note sent home. Next day ..starts all over again, everyone is green. Two reds in a week is NO FUN FRIDAY activities.( usually they write!) I also have no recess after lunch so Friday is our recess AM and PM, movies etc day. I have third grade and it works real well. About October, I find I hardly have to refer to the chart and then it sits as a reminder on my board.
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ticket behavior system
Old 07-21-2007, 05:11 PM
 
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I teach third grade and do use a color ticket system. I have a poster board with 25 library pockets glued on. Each pocket is numbered 1-25. These numbers go along with my student numbers. Each pocket has a green, yellow, purple, red and black strip.
Green -you had a great day
Yellow - you have been warned (warning)
Purple - pause and reflect (time out)
Red - read note (Parent note sent home)
Black - behavioral report (talk with principal)
We start on green each day. When a behavior issue or rule has been broken a ticket is pulled by the student and the assigned consequence occurs. At the end of the day, I record the color and rules broken in a log book to use at conference time. Replace all back to green. By using the numbers instead of names anyone walking in my class does not know which student has had problems. Of course the other classmates soon learn each others numbers. I usually start this after the second week of school. I go over all rules nad expectations. After the first grading period, I rarely have to use this with my class. I have found this to be a good system. Hope this helps.
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I do
Old 07-21-2007, 07:54 PM
 
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I have construction paper taped to my closet door (which is metal) and the kids all have a star on a magnet, with their name on it.
They start out on yellow and move it if necessary
yellow - good day
Green - warning
blue - lose 1/2 of recess ( I might make it all of recess, this year. Not sure)
pink - lose all of recess and phone call/note home
red - sent to office

Our whole school does this and I'm not sure how they got the order of the colors, but I go with it.
I send home behavior reports so technically a note still goes home if they are on yellow or red.

If you don't have recess you could do time out. I was actually thinking about trying that this year. I think at this age, it could still be effective.
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Behavior chart
Old 07-22-2007, 10:13 AM
 
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I have not had to use any behavior system in first grade. However, I'm thinking of using one this year in third. I think I will have a Fun Friday time every week. My chart will have library pockets with index cards in them. The first card will have 30 on it, the second 25, the third 20, etc. for the minutes of Fun Friday (or I may use ten minute increments if I decide to have a longer FF). When there is a misbehavior, I will remove the first card (and put it behind), which takes off 5 minutes from FF for that child. I don't know if this will work, but I'm going to try it.
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Old 07-22-2007, 10:30 AM
 
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I'll be a first year teacher, but this is what my plan will be for behavior management. I got this idea from a 5th grade teacher and have modified it a bit for my schedule and age group.

The students will begin each week with 5 stars (or whatever die cut you prefer) in a pocket chart. The students will have their names on each of the 5 stars in their pocket. If a student breaks one of the classroom rules, they pull a star from their pocket and set it on their desk. This serves as a warning and reminder that they need to make better choices the remainder of the day. If the student gets in trouble again that day, the star is surrendered to the teacher. If they don't have any more infractions, the star goes back in the pocket. On Friday, each of the remaining stars are worth 3 minutes of free time. (The 5th graders had 5 min. each, but my schedule will really only allow for 15 minutes total.)

I like this system because it allows the students to slip up and have a visual reminder that they need to make better choices. The 5th grade class that used this system was pretty much self sufficient and they would pull stars on their own if they didn't have their planners signed, etc. I'd walk by their desks and see a star and they'd admit they messed up and pulled one on their own. I'm not really expecting my third graders to be quite so self sufficient, but hopefully this system will work to help make them more responsible.
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Behavior Apple Chart
Old 07-22-2007, 06:28 PM
 
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Hi! I love this idea, but I was wondering what the chart looks like. Do you have all the apples on the chart for the whole class and then they remove the correct apple and place it on their's? I'm a visual learner and I'm a trying to figure out how it looks. What does each student have to place the apples on?

Thanks a bunch!
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we use a whole grade system
Old 07-23-2007, 05:18 AM
 
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I have a small pocket chart on the wall when you come into the classroom. Each student has one white card with their name written on it, behind that is a green, yellow, then blue card.

When students come in each morning, I greet them at the door and they move the white card that has their name on it to the back of their group of cards. This helps me with attendance in the morning.

pull one card (green to yellow) - warning
pull another card (yellow to blue) - write offs during recess (three paragraphs explaining why rules are to be followed, signed at home)
pull another card (blue to pink) - sanding during recess and note home (you write the infraction on a wooden board and they sand it off)
last card (pink to white name card) - teacher's choice (could be office, could be something else, I truly hate to refer students to the principal)

So far, this works well. I reward students with a star for the prize box if they remain on green all day. If you have nothing more than two yellows, you can eat with the teacher in the room and watch cartoons on Friday. All green for a whole month earns ice cream, for a whole semester, a free day (help another teacher, read to lower grade levels, office helper, etc...)
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stoplight behavior chart
Old 07-24-2007, 12:30 PM
 
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I too use the color colded behavior chart. I have it decorated with stoplights. I use both sides of a 3x5 blank card. I put a sticker label on each side. One green, yellow, red, and black. I color them with markers.

I place them in library pockets on a large tagboard with their student number on the front. Every child begins the day on green- "go". If they break one of the classroom rules, they flip their card to yellow "caution". In the beginning of the year there is no consequence for yellow as it serves as a warning, but the second half of the year I take away part of a recess or something. If they misbehave again, they flip their card to red-"stop". They now loose free time/recess or whatever you choose. The final time they flip their card to black at which time they have to write a note home to their parents explaining their behavior and have it signed by the parent and return. (Always make a copy so they don't accidentally "lose"it. It works well. I have only had one student in MANY years get to black. I also like the idea of using their numbers on the pockets so that another teacher/parent/adult coming into my classroom doesn't know who is in trouble.
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recess
Old 01-23-2009, 06:57 AM
 
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don't take away their recess as a punishment. they need that time to unwind and get out their energy. taking away recess will only make their behavior worse. if you take it away, they won't have any outlet.
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Color cards are not good for most children
Old 02-05-2009, 09:16 PM
 
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The color code system is just wrong for most kids. These children are not dogs you train . The system of taking recess away affects children differently and some are scarred emotionally by this barbaric system.

I would never use this system of emotional torture on children.
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Question about color code system
Old 07-22-2009, 06:32 PM
 
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What do you suggest, Dr. Outlar? I too use the color code system that you are denouncing.
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Old 11-19-2009, 08:37 PM
 
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I agree 100%. I am currently in the process of having my classroom evaluated by a Specialist who thinks this system is "COOL", so I am fighting her suggestion with everything that I have, which isn't much because she has convinced other administrators that she is right; however, I am a living testimonial of what it does to children, with first hand knowledge of what it did to my child, the children of my family and friends. We are still battling the problems associated with the stress our children had to endure. The stress continues long after the children leaves Elementary. Actually, I believe it creates problems for children. I also believe Neurologists are aware of the consequences of using the Color Code, but choose to keep silent so that their business is more profitable.
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Old 11-20-2009, 10:49 PM
 
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MsHead Start...what kind of classroom do you have? After 25 years in the classroom I have never heard of anyone having their classroom evaluated by a "Specialist". Maybe ...if you would give this "Color Coded Behavior Chart" a chance in your classroom it might not be necessary to have a "Specialist" to come in to evaluate. You mentioned that you are still battling the problems associated with the stress your child had to endure, this makes one think that someone's card stayed on red a great deal. That being said... the stress that you are dealing with... really isn't the resort of a "Color Coded Behavior Chart"! Just think what your child's teacher must have had to endurer each day. Give the "Color Coded Behavior Chart" a chance, it works and most parents like the daily feedback concerning their childrens' behavior.
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Classroom management
Old 01-16-2010, 01:04 PM
 
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Dr. Outlar what is your idea of teaching consequences to students?
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Classroom management
Old 01-16-2010, 01:08 PM
 
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What are you using in your classroom for teaching consequences? Do you feel that redirection really works, or does it give a child an easy way out?
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Public humiliation
Old 05-04-2012, 04:28 PM
 
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I think this program is horrible. Remember when you were in school? Constantly learning and having to meet some deadline and pass a test... It's a stressful world. Kids giggle and get distracted and make mistakes all day long. That helps them survive the stress. Would you want to make a mistake at 900 in the morning have to "wear" it all day and have everyone to include yourself remember that you made a mistake. It's awful. Who can be motivated by that? Spend time finding ways to encourage participation and reward participation. Try to minimize attention to the behavior problems and make the discipline private.. just like you would like YOUR boss to do!
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Color Code System
Old 08-08-2012, 11:04 AM
 
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Teachgal, I student taught this past year and my host teacher had the color coded system. She had green (Great Day), Yellow (Warning w/ no consequence), two levels of Blue (Silent Lunch and/or No Recess), Red (Note home). If the student reached Red, this means they still lost recess and had silent lunch along with a note home/parent contact. She used assigned numbers instead of their names on a clothespin (clip). Each child was responsible for moving his/her own clip to the correct color when required to do so. I felt it was VERY effective in that it gave the students a visual status of how they are doing that day. I didn't see a negative effect with any of the fifty plus children I worked with. If anything, it taught them responsibility and that there is a consequence when they choose to break a rule.

Madzma, Dr. Outlar, and MsHead Start, have any of you tried the method? If you have, could it have been rough because you did not personally buy into it? Madzma, for some reason you think that the color changes because of small things like giggling. I only had students move their clip if a rule was broken. "No giggling" or "no getting distracted" was never a rule I've seen in classrooms.
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what else for discipline
Old 04-17-2013, 04:48 PM
 
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Classroom management is the teacher's responsibility -- ie., how to teach the subjects, set up the classroom, orderly items. Discipline is the child's responsibility. For too long there has been this false conception that you have to DO something to a child to "get them to behave." This is beyond faulty thinking. Illiciting consequences is a far better teacher. You cannot MAKE anybody do anything. Yes, the card flipping works only temporarily, but the damage is permanent. Teachers thinks it works because they feel they regain control. Teachers aren't to be police officers. Behavior is learned just like math, grammar, etc. Would you punish if they couldn't understand fractions? NO you'd figure another way. For strong willed children there is another good book "You can't make me, but I can be persuaded." Compliance and obedience never creates desire. Desire is a necessary component in raising responsibility, which is the goal -- responsible, self aware children.
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