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Anyone ever used LLI before? (Leveled Literary Intervention)

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nstafins nstafins is offline
 
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nstafins
 
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Anyone ever used LLI before? (Leveled Literary Intervention)
Old 09-13-2016, 06:12 AM
 
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Hi! This is my first year as a Title 1 tutor and my second year teaching. Last year I was a 5th grade language arts teacher, but was a part of a massive riff at the end of the year. I'm doing reading intervention for 7th and 8th graders using the LLI program. I've never used it before and it's brand new to the district so no one can give me any input.

If anyone has ever used it before, I could use some advice. I just feel as if it's so boring for the kids. To read a new book silently every single day (sometimes awful selections) and then do a writing activity where they are not even graded? I know they hate coming to my class because it's boring and I can't blame them. I'm not allowed to deviate from the curriculum.

I love that the LLI has a lesson plan book, but I often have questions when looking through it. For starters, what the heck do I do with their writing after they finish it? I always read it and make comments, or we discuss it together but that's it. Also, what do I need to do while they are silently reading? The lessons state each book should be read silently so meanwhile I'm just wandering around and keeping busy. My next thing is that some kids are faster readers than the others, so I always tell them to read independently when they finish the class book but I often catch them staring vacantly into space or falling asleep.

I just don't find the program very engaging, or the books high interest. And meanwhile, I'm at a loss for what to do. Maybe I'm doing something wrong? I've watched all the training videos and been to a seminar. I'm just feeling very blah about it.


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ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
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Leveled Literacy Intervention
Old 09-16-2016, 12:27 PM
 
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Four thoughts...I teach LLI at elementary.

1. While students are reading silently, you should be asking each child to read aloud to you. (Yes, I know there are tests every other story, but this will give you other info and more often.) Then ask a few questions about what was read/have the child retell what was read. The child answers orally.

This will give you info about the child's fluency, decoding skills, vocabulary understanding, and comprehension. You will also build a caring relationship with the child, and there will be good teachable moments too.

Be sure to keep notes on the child's fluency, decoding skills, vocabulary understanding, and comprehension because these will help you write reports at the end of your intervention weeks.

Your notes might also give you ideas for a small skill group that your students need...one not laid out in the LLI plans. (Example: Perhaps you will notice that your students do not look for smaller works in unknown larger words when reading orally. This would be a good skill to review and reteach several times.)

2. I made some generic game boards. On the few spaces on the game boards I wrote "lose a turn," "go back two spaces," "roll again," etc...those kind of notes you find on game boards. I took a few stories (not all) and made question cards with the answers also printed on the card.

Partners need a game board, a stack of questions, and a die. The purpose of the game is comprehension. Then the game is played like any other game...roll the die, partner asks question and waits for answer, answer a question correctly, move spaces...answer the question incorrectly, stay where you are.

My kids love doing this!

3. If the selection is non-fiction, have students place a post-it-note at the end of each section of one thing they learned in that section. This could be part of the class discussion after all are done reading silently. Before asking students to do this, I would read the first section aloud to students and model, model, model how this post-it-note expectation will be done.

4. When conferencing with you students, have them read their writing piece aloud to you. Look for misspellings and have them search the text to find out how to spell the work correctly. (Very few low readers use the text when writing to assist with spelling.) You can also help students correctly spell "no excuse words" correctly...words they should spell correctly at all times. (Many low readers also have spelling delays.)

Also, have students share their writing piece with the whole group, or partner students to share their writing piece. They can decide if the written answer truly answers the question. They can also work on editing together if they are partnered.

You will want to keep all their writing pieces because this will help you when writing your end-of-intervention reports. (Example: When asked to respond in written form, Matt often spells "no excuse words" incorrectly. [Give examples of the words and how they are spelled by Matt.] At times, he uses correct punctuation and capitalization independently, but often needs to be reminded. His answers to questions are vague rather than specific. If the answer to a comprehension question is the middle of a bull's eye, Matt's answers are in the rings around the bull's eye rather than in the center of the bull's eye.)

Last edited by ConnieWI; 09-16-2016 at 12:51 PM..
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nstafins nstafins is offline
 
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Old 09-19-2016, 05:13 AM
 
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Thank you so much!! These are such great suggestions! I had the kids mark the text with sticky notes today and it added so much to our discussion. The kids were also a little miffed about having to read out loud to me, but I brought in a comfy chair and whoever read to me got to sit in the chair...seemed to work!

As far as the gameboards, did you buy cardboard to create them or just use poster board? I would like to make some up this week and get that going. Thank you so much! You're advice has really helped me. I have a much clearer picture of things I need to do.
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ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
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Responding to Your Questions
Old 09-20-2016, 05:32 PM
 
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I made one game board on 11" x 17" paper and then ran off several others. To make the original, I used a ruler to just make squares around the outside in pencil, and then traced over the pencil lines in heavy black marker.

One story was about a racehorse, so I made the game board in the shape of a race track. Then I added a picture of the horse from the story in the middle of the game board.

Another story was about a humorous family, and I enlarged head shots of the family to put in the center of the game board.

I found it was easier to make the game boards and game cards on just regular copy paper. The game cards could be run on several colors to keep one set of cards separate from another if you are running more than one set per story. Regular copy paper is easier to fold and place in a file folder for storage. I rubber banded the game cards and put them in a ziplock bag with the title of the story on the bag.
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