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Resource help for teaching the ABCs!

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lenguages lenguages is offline
 
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lenguages
 
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Resource help for teaching the ABCs!
Old 09-28-2016, 06:42 AM
 
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Does anyone know of a resource - be it online or on paper, that teaches BOTH sounds that some letters make? All vowels and some consonants have more than one sound, and teaching the AA-Apple doesn't work really well for my K-2 ELLs, who look at me like I'm out of my gourd when I try to tell them the sounds of the letters! I can't find ANYTHING that has both sounds! Any help would be appreciated. What I can teach them from the beginning is less they will have to relearn later.


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LastMinute123 LastMinute123 is offline
 
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Old 09-28-2016, 09:27 AM
 
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Google "Fountas and Pinnell Alphabet Linking Chart." The updated one (for sale here: http://www.heinemann.com/products/E02807.aspx) has all the sounds of the vowels, c, and g. It's helpful to have as a reference when you get to a word like 'face' so you can say, "That's face, sometimes c says /s/ like celery," point to the chart and then move right on. I would caution you, though - If you teach all the sounds of a (long a in gate, short a in apple, /uh/ in about, nasal a in 'an' and 'am,' ahhh like in car), when they first start learning to decode the word cat you will have kids saying s-ate because they have too many options for the c and the a. Better to gradually release the knowledge so they can be successful at the early tasks of blending. Most kids do just fine learning to decode short vowel sounds then adding in the long vowel sounds and the less common phonics patterns. Plus, c only says /s/ when there is an i or an e after it, but says /k/ when there is an a, o, or u and a needs to be paired with another vowel to become long in most cases. That kind of rule is way over their heads at this point, but won't be once they can blend CVC words.
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MissESL MissESL is online now
 
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Letters and Sounds
Old 09-28-2016, 05:54 PM
 
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Michael Heggerty has been helpful for me. It's not quite as visual, but the sounds, letters, words, breaking up and putting together are all there. I had some hand motions, too.
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Spalding
Old 09-30-2016, 04:46 AM
 
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Teaches all the sounds of the individual letters, as well as the phonograms of English. I've used it very successfully, although mostly with students in Years 3-6, rather than K-2. It's used mainstream for the littles, so it should work for ESL as well.
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As their English vocabulary
Old 10-06-2016, 09:12 AM
 
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improves, using meaning ("what makes sense?") us a great way to help determine which sound to assign to the letters. Trying to gargle out words sound by sound can overwhelm the idea that reading is about making meaning.

And, bless us all, English has a huge phonics problem since The Great Vowel Shift of the middle ages, and our odd exceptions (bead and head no longer rhyme, past tense read and present tense read depend on context, etc.) along with the German speaking typesetters who printed the first published English bible.

It is very helpful to know the sounds associated with letters, but to use them as only one third of the ways to figure out which word to say when looking at print.

I'm try to be sure my students know the story idea and major vocabulary before they begin to read (doing a picture walk through the book before beginning is most helpful) so that they are not guessing into the unknown but rather using multiple cues to help figure out the print.


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