They won't stop talking! - ProTeacher Community


lil annie's Avatar
lil annie lil annie is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,468

lil annie
Senior Member
 
lil annie's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,468
They won't stop talking!
Old 09-13-2007, 02:54 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

This is my 18th year to teach so I am not a novice at it. I have a group of students (first grade) this year who absolutely will not shut up for any length of time. I don't expect my room to be a quiet place but there is a time for talking and a time for being quiet. I hand out good news tickets (for a Friday drawing with our principal) for children who are doing what I need for them to do. I take away priveleges and write in conduct folders for those who choose to continue to talk. Some of them absolutely do not care about either thing. I've got 3 who sit alone and it's only the 3rd week of school. They talk out loud to themselves. I've gotten the parents involved and it hasn't helped. I asked a couple of the kindergarten teachers how they got them quiet last year and they said they never could. Suggestions?


lil annie is offline   Reply With Quote


ecsmom's Avatar
ecsmom ecsmom is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 6,415

ecsmom
Senior Member
 
ecsmom's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 6,415

Old 09-13-2007, 03:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I have a very chatty K class this year. They are better early in the day so I am trying to accomplish as much as I can then. We have a very scattered specials schedule with some things being as early as 8:30 and others not until 1:00. I've noticed that they are better when we have the late specials. We had an early morning assembly this week. They were out of sorts for the rest of the day.

I use the give me 5 sign to get them quiet. Sometimes I will tell them to put their hand over their mouth to help them remember not to talk while I am teaching.

Good luck. Some groups just seem to be more talkative than others.
ecsmom is offline   Reply With Quote
nanz's Avatar
nanz nanz is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 210

nanz
Full Member
 
nanz's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 210
Whisper Day
Old 09-13-2007, 04:49 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I have done this with both kinder and now with my fourth graders. When I notice that their talking is getting out of hand, I have a whisper day. I teach in a whisper and they have to participate in a whisper. My students really seem to enjoy it. The hard part is remembering to whisper when you get excited about something.
nanz is offline   Reply With Quote
brownbear brownbear is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 346

brownbear
Full Member
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 346
Chatty Bunch Too
Old 09-15-2007, 09:41 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I have a class of 32 first graders and they just won't stop talking either. I've tried the whispering while we work thing as well and it just doesn't phase them that they are just too loud. Sometimes I think the problem is the class size and other times I just think the children don't have self control yet. They only get too loud during their work period at their work area. They pay attention during group time and as we walk through the halls. I would really like to just turn the volume down.
brownbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Judy24's Avatar
Judy24 Judy24 is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,491

Judy24
Senior Member
 
Judy24's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,491
Silent time
Old 09-16-2007, 12:54 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I've tried this before and it has worked a few times and only one time not at all so it may be worth a try.

When they are chatty when I'm trying to teach I stop teaching and raise my hand and begin counting to five on my fingers. If I reach five then they owe me a minute of silence. If I reach 10 then they owe me another minute and so on. I've only got to 15 once and then they owed me three minutes. During the minute or two of silence if one person utters a sound we start over. I stop right there and take my minute. I figure that we weren't learning anyway because we were talking so the minute of silence will get us back on track. I do explain before hand that the reason we're doing this is to remind us that we are here to learn and that their talking is taking time away from our learning so we're going to sit and think about it. This usually works with kids that want to learn, but they just forget that they're in school and they can't just blurt out what they are thinking. After a few times of silence they don't even make it to five anymore.

Like I said this works for good kids that aren't trying to be mean, but just can't remember to be quiet. If that's your case, give it a try.


Judy24 is offline   Reply With Quote
shelley81's Avatar
shelley81 shelley81 is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 232

shelley81
Full Member
 
shelley81's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 232
Sometimes
Old 09-16-2007, 02:15 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

You have those classes. My class last year was extremely talkative. I thought it was just me because that was only my third year teaching but now the second year teacher, who has been teaching for 17 years, is having the same problem with them. I used extra recess, I gave the students that were behaving and not talking out five "extra" minutes of recess while the others stood there and watched. I never made it a punishment...just a reward for the students who were attentive and not talking continously. I always told the students that were talking that they were making a poor choice and then I would really praise, praise, praise the students that were not talking and paying attention. Do make sure you give them time to talk during the day, so that when it is your time to talk you can tell them. Now class, you have had YOUR time to talk now it is MY time to talk. For every minute you continue to talk, we can come back and PRACTICE being quite at recess. Most of the time it was effective. Hope some of these suggestions work.
shelley81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Lighthouse5 Lighthouse5 is offline
New Member
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 8

Lighthouse5
New Member
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 8
Talkative kids
Old 09-18-2007, 06:36 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Regarding help with talkative kids.

Each student in my class is given 10 tickets at the beginning of the week. We review the class rules and if a student breaks a rule I just ask for a ticket. I don't say stop this or that all day. All I have to saw during class is, "I think I'll take a ticket from..." and then it gets quiet. It is pretty cool. I also give away tickets for quiet workers. They love to receive tickets. At the end of the week I have a drawing. The more tickets, the better the chance to win. My husband made a wooden treasure chest that hold all the prizes. We usually pick 3-5 tickets for prizes a week. They love this day. Every Monday we start over. I also give kids a chance to earn them back if they keep blowing it.

My talkative kids the hang of it and quiet down after a couple of weeks.

I also reward the class for good behavior, being quiet, etc. I have a Class 100 grid. The paper has 100 squares on it. When the class is quiet, lines up quiet, comes to circle quietly, sits during circle quietly, etc. I put a sticker on the chart. Before we start the chart though, we vote as a class what our goal will be when we fill up the chart. We are currently working toward a pizza/movie party. The parents are happy to support it when they see the children earned it.

Both these things help a lot at the beginning of the year when I establishing routines, etc. They love it and have fun. Later on during the year I don't use it as much because they know the routine.

This is what I do, hopefully, it will give you ideas.
Lighthouse5 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
ARCHIVE
Thread Tools



Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:38 PM.


Copyright © 2014 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net