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PollyCarp PollyCarp is offline
 
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Attention-Seeking: strategies other than ignoring
Old 03-24-2017, 09:34 PM
 
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So, second grade. The kiddo in question has the behavior of a kinder-first grader, but has generally been manageable. But for the past few days I've been teaching some subjects in a scream voice and calling the office to have him removed from my classroom. He's being loud and disruptive and engaging in highly provocative behaviors in order to get attention. I know it is attention seeking because he is looking straight at me and announces most of his more dramatic actions before he does them. (For example: "OneómoreóbigóKICK!" before kicking my desk so hard that it leaves a serious dent.

The ignore-remove pattern is clearly not working and the rest of my class, though they're being rockstars about it, is clearly stressed out and not really learning what I scream at them.

I've been ignoring because engaging with him just escalates him faster and wilder.

When he shows any semblance of expected behaviors or at least being calm, I give him positive attention.

I've also begun documenting everything for many reasons.

There's a lot of complexities to this issue, but basically, I'm struggling to find a way to address this behavior that doesn't escalate him and doesn't just ignore and leave him sitting there.


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irises irises is offline
 
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Our procedure
Old 03-25-2017, 10:44 AM
 
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is to call the office for back up as you see signs that it is coming and definitely before he acts out. This is part of our school-wide CPI training. You send your class next door or to another agreed upon location or if you have a co-teacher or aide they can remove your other students. He loses his audience and the other students don't witness anything. You and your administrator then handle it when he's alone with you. Our rule is ALWAYS remove the rest of the class, not the disruptive student. Hope this helps.
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PollyCarp PollyCarp is offline
 
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Hmmmm
Old 03-27-2017, 05:57 AM
 
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My admin wants me to handle him, not her. I might try evacuating the other students but then ignoring him until he calms down, and if he keeps going, call admin. Then see what ground we can gain from there. Thanks for your support!
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Old 04-05-2017, 09:40 AM
 
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Just because he tries to get your attention with his antics does not necessarily mean that the purposr is attention-seeking, I would also consider that it might work avoidance since he does get removed from class and it does not seem like he is doing his work when he does it. If it is avoidance it is working because he gets removed and avoids work. It is a tricky one because you can not really ignore it and you can't really force someone to work if they won't/can't. If it is avoidance, why do you think that is? Is the work too hard? Does he have problems processing what he is supposed t do? Is he anxious about making mistakes?

Is there a behavior specialist or sped teacher who could observe and give input on the purpose of the behavior and replacement behaviors for the student. Does the student seem insightful. Could you talk to him privately and say something like "It seems that you have a really tough time when I teach math, why is that?" and hear what he has to say. Sometimes students give you really spot on answers ad you can work with them from there and sometimes they don't know themselves.
Either way, mix it up a it because if you have been trying something for a while and it is not working and there is no sign of improvement, it is time to something different.
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PollyCarp PollyCarp is offline
 
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Good point
Old 04-06-2017, 02:25 PM
 
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Ah, work avoidance. I haven't thought of that as much. Thanks for bringing that to my attention!

We have a plan in place where he gets to take breaks, and I require him to bring work in to take breaks, so we'll see what happens.

It's been difficult to coach him through work because he has a very low self-esteem. You give him feedback on anything and he'll get sad and spiral into a depressive state. Even if to show him that he did a good job and got a good grade! This is an issue at home as well.

Perhaps a private conversation would be good. Thanks for the tips!


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