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double digit addition/common core
Old 03-29-2017, 10:42 AM
 
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I am currently teaching my first graders how to add double digit #'s and we are now moving onto carrying over/regrouping. I am teaching them to first add the ones and then carry over, but i've seen some people posting online that according to the common core standards we should not be teaching algorithms, such as the carrying over strategy. Is this true? If so, how should I be teaching my first graders to add 79 + 24 that follows the guidelines of the common core standards?
The common core standard is "Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten."

Also, it states "using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction"

Lastly, does anyone know what is meant by "relate the strategy to a written method"
I want to make sure I am teaching math the same way they will be taught in second grade so that they are prepared but now I'm even more confused than I was before.
thanks


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There isn't a prescribed common core method
Old 03-29-2017, 04:24 PM
 
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that I am aware of. Just the idea that students have a variety of methods presented to them, and that they understand the underlying functions of tens and ones. I personally don't see why the standard algorithm shouldn't be taught. I don't think there is a mandate from CC for students NOT to learn them. I just teach the skill with a lot of manipulatives and drawings to support understanding. Our instructional series presents the skills with a lot of different paths to the answer. In the end, we are happy if students choose a method that works for them, and they can explain how they arrived at their answer. I would check with the second grade teacher at your school to see what would be helpful for her to have students know. Do you not have a textbook or mandated curriculum that specifies what is to be taught?
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Old 03-29-2017, 05:13 PM
 
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Hi,
thanks for responding, We do have a math curriculum that is connected to the common core but I work at a private school and sometimes I get nervous that I am not teaching the way the public schools are teaching the common core standards. I think seeing the different interpretations of the common core standards by teachers on the internet made me question myself. I do try to expose my students to different strategies so I guess I'm on the right path. Thanks again.
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Double digits
Old 03-29-2017, 06:21 PM
 
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I thought it was a second grade standard. Having same issue. The Bridges system teaches them to use a number line, or subtract the tens and then something wonky with the ones that makes no sense. The algorithm isn't taught until 4th grade. I taught the algorithm.
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Old 03-29-2017, 06:56 PM
 
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Teach them the algorithm for the love of all things holy.

Sincerely,
2nd grade teacher

In all seriousness though, the people online are probably talking about decomposing. It was all the rage around here for quite some time and left the kids thoroughly confused.

So in your example you'd turn 79 into 70 + 9 and 24 into 20 + 4.

You'd then add 9 and 4 to get 13. And 70 and 20 to get 90. And finally 90+13 to get 103. Or you'd go one step further and break the 13 into 10+3, add the 90 and the 10 to get 100+3=103.

Or decomposing a different way you'd break the 24 into 20+4, then add the 79 and the 20 to get 99+4, or one step further and break the 4 into 1+3 and add the 99 and the 1 to make 100 + 3.

I'm so glad we've gone back to the algorithm.


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seenthelight...
Old 03-30-2017, 01:26 AM
 
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What a perfect answer! Because it was required I taught the "new" way. However I also taught the children the "old fashioned" method too. I always told them that one of the reasons math was so interesting because it allowed them to solve problems in different ways.
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Old 03-30-2017, 10:49 AM
 
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70 + 24
I would draw 7 tens and 9 ones. Then draw 2 tens and 4 ones. THey count the ones first and make a new ten by circling all the ones. Then they count the tens and the leftover ones.

It's important for them to SEE that they are actually making a new ten. I would use unifix cubes for the kids who need something more than drawing.
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thank you
Old 03-30-2017, 03:18 PM
 
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Thank you so much for the helpful replies. I feel much better about teaching the concept. Also, thanks for the good laugh, seenthelght, loved your response.
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Old 03-30-2017, 03:54 PM
 
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We spend a lot of time with base ten blocks. Both actual blocks and sketching them, so the kids get what is happening when we carry using the algorithm.

The "new" way has far too many steps. Far too many places for a 7-8 year old still wrapping their minds around number sense.

Even the parents are happy now. They can help their kids. It's awesome.
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draw
Old 03-30-2017, 03:55 PM
 
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I'm tutoring a 2nd grader who is learning this. Her teacher encourages them to draw 7 sticks for 70 and 9 dots for ones. Then draw 2 sticks and 4 dots. Group the ones into 10 and 3, then count all the sticks.

it takes her forever to do this drawing and she does sometimes miscounts.... much easier doing the algorithm.


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Old 03-30-2017, 04:08 PM
 
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Try having her draw the ones in a ten frame configuration. It helps with the miscounting. We drew a lot too, while doing the algorithm (right next to it to help check their work). Their basic facts weren't stong yet, but now they've got it under control, and it's straight up algorithm up to 3 digits.
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proof seenthelight is right
Old 03-30-2017, 06:14 PM
 
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If you have not seen the video, go to YouTube. Search for "the unintended consequences of TERC Investigations math". It is priceless!
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Old 04-01-2017, 12:25 PM
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I agree with SeenTheLight.
Old 04-01-2017, 12:26 PM
 
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Teach the algorithm, but I also teach that strategy of breaking down tens and ones, adding them separately, and then adding them together. Although, I don't break my decomposing down THAT much! I just want them to see what is happening.
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stack and solve
Old 04-27-2017, 03:25 PM
 
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I teach 2nd, and we call it stack and solve. We go into 3 digits.
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