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Mishellee99 Mishellee99 is online now
 
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Talkative Students
Old 03-02-2006, 02:32 PM
 
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I need some help on how to get my students to stay quiet during class and quit being disruptive. I was thinking about giving detentions to students that will not cooperate with me. I have so many students that are disruptive and give me so much major attitude. I changed the seating charts today and they gave me an attitude about that. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!


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I have this too
Old 03-02-2006, 04:08 PM
 
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I ran off a stack of worksheets about 300 sheets of Kindergarten work. I tell them if they are talking, they must not be doing enough work to keep them busy. Then I give them one off the stack. Then they turn it in. I say nothing and hand them another. They do it. I hand them another. Worked like a charm!! I teach third.
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Old 03-02-2006, 06:15 PM
 
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I teach 6th grade in a very urban, very notorious middle school in Los Angeles. I have the lowest performers, aka: all the behavior problems. I have just recently experienced disrespectful behavior in one of my classes.(I have six) I have five rules that I assigned them to write 150 times each. Many of them said they won't do it. I told them if they don't do it by the next day, they get 1500. If it isn't done by the third day it is 2250. If it still doesn't get done, I have parents come in to sit in class with the student, and have a conference during my planning period. So far, this is the second day, I have only 3 people who didn't turn anything in. It has worked like a charm, and the rumor has gotten around to the whole school, so all the students are afraid to be sent into my room for a time-out! Only one problem: watch for upset parents, I have had two. ... but the conflict was easily solved in my favor.
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I Teach High School
Old 03-03-2006, 04:05 AM
 
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I should have mentioned that I teach high school. So, what would be effective to use with high school students?
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Respect
Old 03-03-2006, 08:06 PM
 
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In the past, when I have encountered high school students that are disruptive, I have asked them in a loud clear voice, "Do you respect yourself?" They stop what they are doing, and then I tell them that they obviously do NOT because when a person respects themselves they respect others and I am NOT feeling it and neither do their classmates. This worked with some that have a thing about being "dissed," but then there are others, that I just have them call their parents right on the spot, in the classroom, and in front of their classmates. Good Luck! Teen agers are hard at times. Just remember that they think they are all grown up, so we need to remind them how grown ups really act and treat others.
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Old 03-05-2006, 06:59 PM
 
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My 2nd grade class tends to be talkative as well. I've started writing the word QUIET up on the chalkboard and whenever they get overtalkative and pretend they don't hear me ask them nicely to be quiet I erase a letter of the word. It truly does get them quiet very quickly because they don't want any more letters erased. If I erase the whole word by the end of the day then the entire class misses morning recess the following day. I've also thought about deducting minutes from recess time for each letter erased. I know that some could argue that the "good kids" get punished or pay the consequences for the talkative ones, but in my class atleast everyone at some point or another talks when they shouldn't, and once I start erasing letters they all remind each other to stop talking. It works for me...hope it will work for others.
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Old 03-06-2006, 01:02 PM
 
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I find it hard to believe that professional teachers can't find a better way of disciplining students than having them write needless sentences 150+ times. I would rather assign them to read a book about discipline and write a report, then atleast they are learning something and when they get done will have learned something new rather than the same old stuff over and over again. I think we do a disservice to students by assigning writeoffs. It is inappropriate in ANY environment and is a complete waste of quality time.
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Old 03-06-2006, 01:03 PM
 
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I find it hard to believe that professional teachers can't find a better way of disciplining students than having them write needless sentences 150+ times. I would rather assign them to read a book about discipline and write a report, then atleast they are learning something and when they get done will have learned something new rather than the same old stuff over and over again. I think we do a disservice to students by assigning writeoffs. It is inappropriate in ANY environment and is a complete waste of quality time.
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no disrespect intended
Old 03-06-2006, 09:23 PM
 
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Djsong,
I competely understand what you are saying, but can I offer an argument? I go back and forth with this situation. I see both sides. Although I understand your side (which I also agree with), how is it not a waste of quality time when the student is wasting your teaching time and disrupting your limited classroom time? I mean, I spend a lot of time coming up with lesson plans and teaching and the disruptful child/children are wasting their learning time --or not doing homework so they're not prepared for the next day's lesson. And then you're held accountabe for their learning although they are the ones wasting that time for not only themselves but their classmates. My students are middle school and don't have recess--detention's a joke-- and they're too cool for school. I'm at a lost for discipline. Not that my classroom's out of control, but can you give concrete examples of discipline that works. I'm starting to understand the "if you're wasting my time--I'm going to find a way to waste your time." I'm not trying to be hostile or disrespectful, but just wondering what works for you?
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Maybe
Old 03-07-2006, 05:59 PM
 
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Well when I had 7th graders last year and boy are they talkative I placed a mark on the white board each time I had to stop teaching because of someones silliness. I never said anything after the first intoduction to this method. For each tally mark they lost talk time at the end of class. I gave them the last 5 minutes of class to talk. If they lost all 5 we did a heads down silence for the last 5 of class. IT worked most days for me. They need time to talk to each other. That's life. As the year progressed the students would actually ask if they could finish their work instead of having talk time. I was flexible with that. I really loved 7th grade.
Now 8th grade was really tough. They were so full of themselves that it was a rough year. I got bumped out of middle school and now teach 1st and 2nd grade. In my masters class a visiting principal said that for the really tough cases he has a set of character books and the student has to read about the character trait that they are having the most trouble with. Then they do a report both written and oral to him. Good luck
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Good idea
Old 03-10-2006, 09:55 PM
 
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I substitute teach and recently I had a class where the teacher had a nervous breakdown and took a leave of absence. I wrote the word FUN on the board and told the kids if they had any letters left at the end of the day we would have an extra recess. They only get 15 minutes at lunch. They always lose all the letters by lunch and I have no way of enforcing "no talking" because I've already taken the word FUN away. I think I'm going to do what you suggested and write FUN in a box and QUIET in a box. After they lose their free recess they can start losing their other recess. This way I'm not punishing the good students because they've already had 3 chances because I really start punishing the class. I'll try this in the next week and see how it works.
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RECESS (5 minutes per letter)
Old 03-27-2006, 08:01 PM
 
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This is my first year to teach and my class is a real struggle!

I teach 5th grade. They have 30 minutes of recess (15 min early recess and 15 min after lunch recess). I write the word RECESS on the board (6 letters-5 minutes each letter). If the class is too noisy...I erase one S (they lose 5 minutes) and so it goes.

This works well if I'm consistent.

Hope this helps!
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150X of wasted learning
Old 04-23-2006, 02:17 PM
 
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I was appalled to see that people still encourage students to write things hundreds of times...Are we trying to teach people or are we trying to get kids to hate learning even more? If we need to resort to having our students write until their hands come off----the problem isn't the student, it is the teacher. How about creating hands-on learning so that kids are active learners. Kids aren't supposed to be quiet all of the time....the days of 100% lecture style teaching are a militant way of the past...if you give your kids an outlet for expression, they won't feel the need to disrupt. Also, if we respond to their disruption with frustration...they get the best of you and know that there are buttons to push. Create a new classroom management program...
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Character report books?
Old 04-29-2006, 06:54 PM
 
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I'd love to know the names of some of those character trait books the principal had kids read? Was that for the 8th graders or after you went down to 1st & 2nd grade?
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Old 05-19-2006, 06:36 PM
 
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Yes, please do reply on the character books. I would love to know the titles.
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Old 05-20-2006, 03:50 AM
 
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This is always tough. However, if you have your students reading or doing more meaningful work, then you are setting them up for thinking that schoolwork is punishment. Writing meaningless lines will never be done again as an assignment, so they won't feel that what they will do someday in class is punishment. If I asked a child to stay in and read a discipline book, then reading is now a bad thing! Just my two cents... I find that talking to my kids - sharing my thoughts - telling them that I can make like fun with cool projects or boring with loads of worksheets - getting on my soapbox - these all really work for me!
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Get them involved in solution
Old 06-04-2006, 06:13 PM
 
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I teach both ms & hs. The thing that has worked for me the last few months of chaotic spring fever.... On a particularly bad day, I stopped the teaching and had the students write down answers to my questions. I asked "what do you like about this class, what do you dislike about this class, what are you enjoying learning about, what/who disrupts our class the most, what do you think should be done when the class is disrupted, what kind of reward would you like when there is good classroom behavior?" Etc,

I got very interesting responses that I could reflect on and I went back to them the next day and discussed their responses. Together, we worked out a solution to the problem and life has been so much EASIER.

Students at this age want to feel that they are being listened to and that you value their ideas/opinion. If they are part of the solution, they are invested in it - it's not just "some dumb teacher's plan".

Here was their solution:
We meet 60 min every day, 5x a week. At the beginning of the week I put 60 tally marks (for their 60 min) on the board for their class. Every time the class is disruptive, I erase a tally mark. On Friday, towards the end of the class, we count up the tally marks and get that many minutes of free time. The first week they had 13 minutes saved, so we took the last 13 minutes of class and went outside. Each week they have managed to save more and more minutes because they have adjusted their behavior. AND, when they lose a tally mark, they REALLY get on the kids who caused it. Ah, I love peer pressure.
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Old 12-08-2006, 04:41 AM
 
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good for u
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Old 12-08-2006, 04:43 AM
 
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good for u you should make them write 10000 times-lines each
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no bad ideas!
Old 07-30-2007, 08:03 AM
 
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hey
im a high school student and my teacher assigned me a report on disaplin because i was talkin. all your ideas dont seem to work. if a kid is talkin have themod what my teacher is. plenty of tmies i have had to write things over and over. i learn nothing except that it hurts my hand. make us do something that is as much work but we LEARN something. isnt that your goal from the beginning. to teach. i have adhd and this is the first teacher who has gotten through to me. hes cool. he is awsome but strick. he talks when u have a problem. so u guys need to chill alittle.
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Me too!
Old 09-27-2007, 05:54 AM
 
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i also put erase letters. i put up the activity that they are trying to reach and erase a letter when they are extrememly disruptive
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Positives
Old 02-19-2008, 05:38 AM
 
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Way to go! You are giving a reward that can be earned. A lot of teachers/parents get caught in the trap of just punishing. It's easier and takes less energy to take away something than to set up both positive rewards as well as negative consquences. Your students are lucky to have you.
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response to hs student
Old 04-18-2008, 06:11 AM
 
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Hi,

Please listen to your English teacher. It seems that you've missed some classes on grammar. Good luck!
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Old 10-20-2008, 08:52 AM
 
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You are aware that what you are doing is a form of corruptal punishment which is illegal.
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Old 08-25-2009, 04:31 AM
 
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Love it!! Trying it on my 2nd graders today!
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Old 01-26-2010, 06:22 PM
 
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After teaching for several years, I have come across a student that not only stumps my discipline efforts, but causes my tensions to rise daily. He is a sweet child, but SO very talkative that I cannot control our class anymore. He is CONSTANTLY talking.. I mean CONSTANTLY! I hear him talking to himself in the restroom!!! He is very bright, and though I really try to see this as a positive, I am growing weary in trying to control our lesson times. I want to encourage him, and not separate him, as I want him to participate.. but I am at my wits' end! His parents are not very helpful and excuse his talkative/disruptive nature. I don't know what else to do. He is like a continuous tape recorder... and the other students are now following suit. I am going to try some of the methods I have read so far, but would love something more appropriate for his age. What are your suggestions?
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be a student
Old 02-17-2010, 07:17 PM
 
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hi..Mishellee do one thing u r a teacher try to be a student some time when you are in your class.Because they are growing up fastly...they are on the stage where they use to think that they are best....you simply let them feel important in your class.praise them for there work not necessary it is ur subject or not. may be some on of them is good in music other one in dance or in painting or writing some time not in front of ur class but in front of your collegues.It needs great patient......but you will get a good result.i m favourite teacher of my studends because i m the one infront of whom they are free as a human.They come to me with their personal problems and I use to solve their problems some time as a teacher other time as a mother,as a friend,as a senior,as a junior.When ever you change their seats let them feel that you are changing their seat because of your faith that it is not important for them but for you beause you want your class to be a best class in the school and he\she is helping in it.Dont fell shy in saying thanks personally for that.....
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Old 04-22-2010, 07:27 AM
 
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Many times, the disruptive students cannot read. I cannot stop teaching the others 8th grade science to teach them to read. I never use writing sentences over and over as a way to discipline students, but it's tempting. It's easy to say something's not appropriate if you've never been in a particular situation.
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Old 08-26-2010, 11:54 AM
 
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It figures that you would be an educational consultant. I would love to videotape you in a tough urban school district teaching at-risk high school students who are enrolled in science or math classes. Furthermore, the experience of being held accountable for standardized tests against your reputation would be a joy to witness. Since you have the answers to classroom discipline problems perhaps you should inspire us all by sharing them.
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Old 01-18-2011, 06:46 PM
 
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well said...as a fellow high school teacher in an urban setting, i can understand exactly where you are coming from. Idealism is great, but doing it in this type of a classroom is quite another thing. you truly cannot understand it until you do it day in and day out.
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Old 06-11-2011, 09:19 PM
 
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Really love your opinion. Wish my son is in your class.
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Another option
Old 06-12-2011, 03:01 AM
 
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I made lists of vocabulary words related to units in science and social studies. Students who ignored a warning about talking were required to look up each word in the dictionary (not the textbook glossary) and write out the entire definition. Each list had 10 words. An explanation at the top indicated to student and parent that it was extra work required because the student couldn't control talking in class. A parent signature was required.
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Another Option for Class Disruptions
Old 11-04-2011, 02:59 PM
 
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I teach 8th grade mathematics and Algebra 1 in a middle school in a very rural setting. Things to bear in mind when working with middle school children and those who are younger are first, their bodies are still developing, especially their tailbones, which haven't fused completely yet, and it is physically painful to sit for more than 10-15 minutes at a time without getting anxious. With being uncomfortable and anxious comes inattentiveness and talkativeness at times. Children want to move and talk; therefore, I let them do both. For example, little Johnny is talking out of turn in class, and he is disrupting the learning process. I have a large, rubber die on which I write things on each of the six sides. For instance, on one side I write, tell the class one important fact you have learned in class so far today. On another side, I write how can I use what we are learning in class today in real life every day? The way I use this is when little Johnny is talkative and therefore disruptive, I will say, "Little Johnie, let's roll the dice and see what happens. Heads up!" I then toss little Johnnie the die and ask him to read the side facing him out loud and do what it says because I need his help in teaching the class for a moment. I have never had a child in 11 years of teaching middle school to refuse to catch the die and have the opportunity to "teach the class". If the child did refuse, I have a supplemental plan. All right, Little Johnnie, if you don't want to teach the class, then would you be interested in playing a little basketball? No boy will turn you down. Then say, okay, if you take take this rubber die I have, stand right here this far from the trash can, toss the die and make the basket, you do not have to help me teach the class, but, for every basket you can make in the next 15 seconds, if you are quiet and pay attention for at least that same amount of time so that I can teach, there is a reward available to you. I waste no more than 30 seconds of class time total, little Johnnie remains quiet for the time that equals the number of baskets he has made, he hasn't gotten to move around a little, shoot hoops, and wins a prize. The prizes range from an extra "potty pass" to leave class to use the restroom that nine weeks (students are allowed 3 per nine-week period and cannot leave the class once all three are used); a handful of candy dumped on his desk or sugar-free candy for diabetic children; a ticket for free computer time or the opportunity to share his favorite CD with the class on Friday (provided the teacher has screened it, and it is appropriate for whole-class listening).

Another technique I use is to act just as silly as the kid does. One time I had about 5 students that were so talkative I couldn't teach, so I just turned around and continued teaching to the corner of the wall like my students were behind the wall, and I began to rhyme while I taught. I would say something like, no class, make sure you pass, when you add two plus two, you know what to do just don't be cross, applesauce, and you will do just fine. Well, it's quirky enough to give them a giggle and to regain their attention. Then, I just turn around and continue teaching like I had done nothing else.

Sometimes, not only thinking outside the box but jumping outside it entirely helps. Ha!
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what you should do
Old 02-08-2012, 06:17 PM
 
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what you should do is if they really talk alot then you should take them out of class and call there pereants and tell them that there child is being desruptive in class and that you whant them to stop and you have tried your best to make them stop.
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Thank You!
Old 08-11-2014, 02:10 PM
 
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I'm a high school science teacher and do not have the luxury of recess; however, I do have Fire Fridays, where I do some sort of demonstration with fire. I'm a brand new teacher and have been blessed with a very roudy set of freshmen. But now after having read your post, I'm going to put SCIENCE on the board and start erasing as they carry on. When it's gone, they lose it. Hopefully it adapts well into high school! Elementary teachers are the best resources for classroom management!
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