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Help for auditory learner
Old 09-15-2017, 03:50 PM
 
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I've been teaching a long time, and this year I have a student who is qualified for the gifted and talented program (I can see why--her depth of knowledge is incredible)! She is a 4th grader reading at F&P level U with perfect comprehension.

She cannot spell simple words at all (words like: make, come, this, etc.), and is still reversing her b and d letters at age 10. Her writing is unintelligible ("I cant mack yo cum her" for "I can't make you come here"). She has shown me that she is definitely an auditory learner.

This child has great leadership ability, but because her reading and math skills are so high, she won't qualify for any help. My question is, HOW can I help her? I have shown her how to use spell check (we are 1:1 with devices), but she doesn't recognize her mistakes. I want her to be successful! Thanks in advance!


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Just a thought
Old 09-16-2017, 09:04 AM
 
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Have you checked to see if she can spell words correctly when asked verbally?

If she can then the problem is writing words down more than spelling. She will need to develop a visual awareness of words. I am not sure how to do that but I have seen some programs where they write words on boxed graph paper. They place one letter in each box. You can tell easily which letters poke up into another box or hang down into an additional box. Then they outline the word to give it a shape. That shape can help some spellers.

If she is bright I am sure her brain can be retrained to become more visual.

I will search and see if I can find a program like I am talking about.

Here is an example.

https://www.abcteach.com/directory/s...ities-4143-2-1

http://www.softschools.com/language_...s/word_shapes/


http://tools.atozteacherstuff.com/pr...es-worksheets/

You might also also her to record the spelling of words and then listen to the spelling. I would start with a list of most commonly used words I think. That will give her a boost in writing more quickly.


You might also allow her to dictate some of her writing assignments to a scribe so she can actually produce a higher level of writing without the frustration of spelling.

Last edited by 1956BD; 09-16-2017 at 09:27 AM..
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Can't Spell
Old 09-16-2017, 11:21 AM
 
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Dysgraphia is a problem with writing and spelling coherently.


My son-in-law reads very slowly because his English comprehension is affected by learning the Queen's English in South America. He listens to important stuff on tape/cd and has an amazing memory! He writes fairly well, and gets my daughter or me to proof-read his correspondence. I, on the other hand, am a visual learner... I like to see it/read it/ and I write notes to facilitate remembering it!

There are dictionaries on Amazon.com to help with spelling: The McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Misspelled and Easily Confused Words; How to Spell it: A handbook of commonly misspelled words; etc...

Spell check won't work in a lot of cases; and the English language is a difficult language that generally takes children 3 to 7 years to adjust to. I've noticed in some schools, teachers also allow students to use "inventive" spelling which is similar to the spelling used in text messages and that becomes confusing the older the child gets because he or she was not taught to spell properly.

With that being said, it's a good thing that she is an auditory learner. She learns by what she hears! So as the previous writer said, record her spelling words and any other words she has problems with and let her listen to them as she reads them from a list.

The library has lots of books/cds systems that auditory learners can use to listen to a story as they follow along in the book. Auditory learners need to practice reading and writing words properly as they listen to those words being spoken.

It takes time...

Orientation of letters... remind her on these records that the letters b and p curve to the right, while the lowercase letters d and g curve to the left... etc. etc.... record and teach orientation of alphabet tails and stems... reading from left to right and top to bottom of pages in the English language...

Check out Amazon.com for books of dysgraphia, too.... Terrific Teddy's Writing Wars.... Train the Brain to Hear.... to give yourself more ammunition to fight with (I borrow books from the library as often as I can or buy them used), and perhaps if you think the book is suitable let the student read it!

Last edited by KatrynG; 09-16-2017 at 11:36 AM.. Reason: added thought
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Thanks
Old 09-18-2017, 04:57 PM
 
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She cannot spell words when they are dictated to her. Her reading comprehension is top-notch (high DOK level, etc.). She will spell the word one way the first time she writes it, and a different way the 2nd and so on. I really want her to show that she knows things. It's a shame, really.
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Practice writing
Old 09-19-2017, 05:19 PM
 
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She can read, comprehend, and has a great memory, but there is a disconnect in writing down what she sees.

Is she willing to start practicing writing by tracing over the alphabets? Just like she was taught to read from left to right and top to bottom of the page; she needs to follow the arrows on writing letters and learn to write between three lines: top, dashed middle, and bottom line.
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There are Writing tablets that can be used to help train a younger student to write better. I also used the wide-ruled notebook paper to teach my grandson to practice his writing. I would put dots at the beginning of three lines, then skip a line, and dot the beginning of three more lines. We would laboriously practice keeping his letters between those lines: the uppercase and lowercase letters, including the ones that fell below the bottom line. I showed him how to use his finger to keep spaces between his words, also. I spent a summer having him practice for about 20 minutes a day.

I've seen some 3rd and 4th graders with horrible hand-writing and I don't know if they've ever been shown one-on-one how to stay within the lines.

If you try these things for awhile and it still doesn't work, please seek the help of a professional in dysgraphia.

To learn more about dyslexia and dysgraphia, please read the novel: Fish In A Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt. It's based on a true story and written from a child's point of view. The young girl has always wanted to read, but she sees letters and numbers differently than others. After brilliantly getting through the school system with various coping tactics, she comes to the attention of a teacher who collaborates with her and others to get the problems corrected.

I love how they practice writing with wet sponges on a blackboard to retrain her mind to see the letters properly. Or that might be a scene from the picture book, Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco... another author who struggled with dyslexia and dysgraphia and persevered to become an excellent author of children's books!

Your student can read, so perhaps re-training the brain to associate writing and spelling after reading won't be too difficult. However, it does take time, practice, and patience... and try to associate writing activities with topics that the student cares about... writing to a friend, writing to a soldier, writing about a hobby or writing about a pet or pet project.



Last edited by KatrynG; 09-20-2017 at 05:27 AM.. Reason: add thoughts
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Old 09-19-2017, 06:22 PM
 
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I agree with a PP to check into dysgraphia. I would refer her to special services to see if she can get help from the occupational therapist for fine motor skills. Have you noticed if she has confusion with left/right and other directional activities?
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Old 09-26-2017, 02:14 PM
 
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Is she able to hear and segment the sounds in words? I.e. Know that cat has 3 sounds c/a/t? Just something you might want to make sure of because if you can't segment sounds, you can't attempt to spell a word unless you have just memorized the spelling
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Update
Old 09-29-2017, 07:15 PM
 
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I talked with the SpEd teacher and asked her for advice. She agreed that there is likely some dyslexia going on (we noticed that even when typing she is reversing b and d rather consistently). I'm going to call a conference with mom to see if we can get her some help. Our district doesn't qualify people for SpEd services unless they are below grade level. I am concerned that mom will wonder why we haven't caught this yet--she's already in 4th grade. Her 3rd grade teacher told me, "Well, she just can't spell worth a darn, "but I think there's more to it.
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If Mom asks
Old 10-02-2017, 05:31 PM
 
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because her daughter does so well reading, the spelling and writing issues were seen as minor. We always give students the benefit of extra time to develop at their own paces.

Now it's time to focus and develop areas of spelling and writing.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:08 AM
 
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Sounds like she is what is considered twice exceptional. It means she has a disability and is gifted. It is actually very common. Push for testing. My district will look at discrepancies between performance and intelligence. My own DS is identified as twice exceptional. The district can not refuse testing if the parents ask for it in writing.


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Dragon?
Old 10-13-2017, 12:51 PM
 
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I've heard of a software (called Dragon, I think) that types what you dictate. I wonder if that would work for her?

For the B and D thing - BIG movements like writing the letters in the air with her whole arm,

and rhythm for spelling - bouncing a ball or jumping rope as you say each letter - something that makes a sound and keeps a beat.

Oh, one more idea - my son used to have a toy that recorded what you said and played it back in funny voices - robot, space alien, etc. What if you had her dictate her spelling list into one of those and play the words back?
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Benefits
Old 11-01-2017, 05:28 PM
 
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I'm curious to know what tangible benefits this student received from being tested. Did she qualify for special ed. services and if so, how have they been helpful (i.e. specific improvements)? Did her disability impede her academic progress before and/or after receiving services, if any?

Last edited by Ucan; 11-02-2017 at 03:01 PM.. Reason: spelling errors
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She hasn't been tested
Old 12-07-2017, 06:23 PM
 
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She is working really hard on her writing. She is designated Gifted.
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