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LindseyTeach
 
 
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Letter name and sound trouble
Old 10-17-2017, 09:36 AM
 
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I have a student who is working with me one on one on the letters and sounds of the alphabet. We work 30 minutes daily. He still continues to struggle. It isn't the same letter he misses everyday, it doesn't follow a pattern, no reversals, just like he suddenly has NO clue what the letter is. Or I may give a sound and he cannot remember the letter for the sound. Some days he does great. Any suggestions? Any fun daily alphabet activities? Thank you in advance.


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Old 10-17-2017, 05:17 PM
 
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I did Title I for three years and did some interventions last year as well with kindergarten and first grade students. I found teaching them systematically helped. So, introduce 4-5 letters (names or sounds only). Work on activities with just those like you would when introducing sight words. Drill them a few times a day if possible. I sent the letters/words home, posted them around the room, randomly asked kids to say them, etc. Spend a few days on just those 4-5 letters then introduce a new letter or two. Keep adding a few in at a time until they've got them. For sounds I've done it this way but what I found worked best was to teach them 4 sounds and then start blending 2 and 3 letter words with them. Then introduce 4 more. Usually I introduce almost all the consonants and just short a before introducing another vowel. Before introducing a second vowel they are already reading short sentences and stories with just the sounds I've taught. As far as activities with letters... I find sheets of mixed letters and have them highlight (or I make my own), mix magnetic letters and have them point to random ones, have them fish for letters with a fishing pole, have them hop from letter to letter, etc. When reviewing flash cards whether it be letters, numbers, sight words, etc. I show it to them and say "This is T, what letter?
That's right T." I go through the whole stack that way when I first introduce them and then I mix them and go back through asking "What letter?" If they miss it I cycle it two back and continue through the stack.
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this might help
Old 10-19-2017, 12:08 PM
 
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I used zoo phonics with at risk first graders with good success. I notice that the program is more expensive than when I last ordered it. You may be able to get funding through donors choose.

the program does use a multi-sensory approach: visual, motor, auditory along with motivating songs. I had very few who didn't get involved with the approach. Each letter is assigned an animal and a movement and letter sound associated with that animal. Initially, the letter is presented with the animal incorporated and later the animal picture is removed, transferring learning. Some of my students made the letter movements during spelling tests to help them. I modeled making the movements in miniature behind their test "barricades."

https://zoo-phonics.com
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letters/sounds
Old 10-21-2017, 09:57 AM
 
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I agree with Lillybabe's advice on presenting only a handful of letters to mastery at a time. Someone else on here once suggested to me that she had a struggling student point to the letters of the alphabet and sing the ABC's, but they practiced each day with the SOUNDS of the letters, not their names. Maybe learn to sing it both ways?
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Old 10-22-2017, 12:10 PM
 
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Involve as many learning modalities as you can.; (i.e. let the child make the letter with Play Doh, make sandpaper letters for him/her to trace, make dotted letters; (just lower case), for him/her to trace. While he/she traces each letter part, be sure he/she says that letter's sound~ this is how you can get the child to use kinesthetic, oral, visual, and auditory modalities all at once. Only focus on a few letters at a time. You can also make up rhymes or chants for each letter, such as: "b is for bat, /b/ , /b/ bat", "e is for egg, /e/, /e/, egg! YOu can also find cd's that he she can listen to to reinforce the letters sounds and names. Alpha Bop is the only one I can think of, right now.
I hope these ideas help you. Also, ask if your school/school district can order the "S.R.A." program. It incorporates the different modalities in workbooks, in which each page focuses on a specific sound. It is very repetitious and provides a lot of practice for students.


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Fundations
Old 10-22-2017, 04:11 PM
 
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I really like Wilson Reading and Fundations for teaching letters, sounds, and beyond. Here's several Fundations alphabet charts I found on Google images. It's a long link. If it doesn't post, just google it.

https://www.google.com/search?q=fund...EILDAB#imgrc=_

Start by having the child repeat after you... a - apple - /a/ (the sound), b - bat - /b/, c - cat - /c/, etc. Do it every day. When ready, have the child read the chart himself, slowly decreasing your cues. You can then enlarge the chart and make individual flashcards to practice the letters out of order. In my experience, kids who have trouble with letters/sounds will begin to think back to the chart when trying to remember the sound a letter makes.

Just noticed several people put the cards on youtube also.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kbPqHe4u7k
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Question
Old 10-22-2017, 04:14 PM
 
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Do you find that the students who need to learn their letters and sounds in first grade instead of kdgn. are able to be on grade level by the end of the year?
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Old 10-22-2017, 05:08 PM
 
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It all depends. I get 1 or 2 kids every year who went to daycare instead of kindergarten. It takes a lot of extra tutoring (Title 1 teacher, teacher and peers) but most catch up. For the kids who went to kindergarten, a few just weren't developmentally ready a year ago and can catch up now. For those who still don't know most of their letters/sounds by December, I refer them to our child study team. Some will repeat grade 1 and some will be referred for a sped evaluation.
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