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TeachNFriend TeachNFriend is offline
 
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Hearing sounds
Old 11-23-2017, 04:27 AM
 
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Iím working with a student who doesnít seem to hear sounds. When she spells a word and we stretch out the sounds, sheís adding in unheard letters and never chooses the right vowel. Itís like she canít differentiate between the sounds.

Has anyone else run into this? If so, how would you handle it? This girl is in grade 4. Her strength is her visual memory. She can remember things like sight words which has been getting her by in reading, but that is stilted too because she doesnít always remember the word and sounding out doesnít work for her at all.


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ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
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Just a Question...
Old 11-23-2017, 04:55 AM
 
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When was the last time her doctor tested her hearing?
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Old 11-23-2017, 07:33 AM
 
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I would also agree with having her hearing tested.
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Old 11-23-2017, 07:37 AM
 
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Are you her classroom teacher or a specialist? I just started working on Tier 3 interventions with a student who has similar difficulties. I consulted our SLP because the student also has some trouble correctly pronouncing some sounds. His recommendation was to encourage the parents to have the child seen by an audiologist to rule out hearing loss as the cause.

Beyond that, I am working with the student (2nd grader) on phonemic awareness interventions 1:1 for 10 minutes a day. Right now he is segmenting words with 2 sounds. We "drag the sounds down" into Elkonin boxes. I track his errors and have been able to identify some target sounds that he has more trouble with than others, so when I make the word lists, I always include multiple exposures/practice with those sounds. When he increases his accuracy with 2 sounds, we will move to segmenting 3 sounds.

re:vowels. Is your student a 2nd language learner? Because that could be a factor in the difficulty differentiating between vowels (as could hearing). Is she saying the vowel sound correctly and then using an incorrect spelling? Do you have sound/spelling cards that the student could refer to? Or does your school teach any kind of kinesthetic movement to partner with the sounds (TPR, Body Coding)? If the problem seems to be hearing/differentiating the vowel sounds, pairing the sound with a movement could cue her and provide support while interventions are attempted. For interventions, you might teach her the mouth positions of the vowel sounds (differences in short a/e/i are hard to see unfortunately), otherwise I would suggest targeted sound practice with repetition.

If she is not applying phonics rules as a 4th grader, I would also suggest a diagnostic inventory that breaks down phonics skills to identify areas for intervention. If hearing loss is ruled out and interventions don't result in improvement, then I would consider a SPED evaluation.
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Old 11-23-2017, 09:03 AM
 
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That's a classic sign of dyslexia or "Specific Learning Disorder: Reading Impairment" like our state calls it.

It sounds like she is weak on phonological awareness, and probably needs an intervention using multisensory instruction. Or, less likely, she might have Auditory Processing Disorder.

Do you have any reading specialists who use one of the many programs for dyslexia like Take Flight, Wired for Reading, The Barton System, The Wilson System, Slingerland, Sonland, or any other Orton Gillingham based program? It's also possible that your Speech Language Pathologist has some strategies to help her.

If your student if bright, it's possible she has been compensating in the younger grades enough that her issues are not really coming out until 4th grade. One quick way to help her is to have her tap her fingers for each phoneme as she is sounding out words. Ex: path - "p" thumb taps index finger, "a" thumb taps middle finger, "th" thumb taps ring finger. Then blend slowly with each sound distinct and then quickly like a real word. You may need to borrow some phonics materials from 1st grade sites. They should have checklists to help you isolates sounds that are harder for her. Also work on syllables with "beats on the body". "Document" beat "doc" on wrist, beat "u" on elbow, beat "ment" on shoulder. This exaggerated and very physical method really emphasizes the syllables.


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Speech & language
Old 11-23-2017, 09:45 AM
 
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Yes, check hearing. Auditory processing issues?

There is material from Scientific Learning called Fast ForWord which can be used by speech/language professionals to help with these issues.
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Thank you
Old 11-23-2017, 04:29 PM
 
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These are all fantastic suggestions. The student is new to our school this year so I think weíre going to have to start from scratch and assess everything. Previous school didnít mention any concerns
I will follow up on her hearing first. I canít believe I didnít think of this. I will try to connect her with an SLP as well. Maybe she can rule out a few things for us; like auditory processing and identifying weak areas. In the meantime, I will keep working on increasing her phonemic awareness. I do have visuals for the short vowel sounds. Iíve been working in small groups with her, but she may need me to focus in one on one. She does ALOT of guessing in small group.
Unfortunately our district doesnít recognize dyslexia and no programs are available. I think itís such a disservice to our struggling students but thereís nothing I can do about that:roll eyes
I havenít tried multi sensory with her yet, but itís worth a try. Sheís a sweetheart and I really want to see her succeed.
Thanks for all the great advice.
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Sound Reading Solutions
Old 11-23-2017, 05:38 PM
 
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I remember using a computer program years ago called "Sound Reading Solutions." If they still have it, I'd recommend trying that.

Also, since you said she's visual, what about creating some sound cards that she can see as she rearranges them into the words?
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Body Coding?
Old 11-24-2017, 01:43 AM
 
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WGReading, what is this? I just tried to google it but came up empty-handed. Can you please explain or provide a link?
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Update
Old 11-24-2017, 04:27 PM
 
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I did a phonological awareness assessment with my student today and she had the most difficulty at the single phoneme level. If I made the phoneme sounds k/a/t she could hear it and put it back together, but she couldnít break words apart into those same phonemes. For example, when she tried to separate the phonemes for dog, it sounded like do-o-o-guh. She also struggled with syllabication at the phoneme level. She could read 50% of blends and could identify the long vowel sounds, and only the short O vowel. No vowel pairs or diphthongs. Inconsistent with digraphs. Iíll check on her hearing next week.


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Old 11-24-2017, 08:37 PM
 
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Wow! It sounds like she needs assessment through Special Services.

Have you noticed any other interesting things like strong math except for slow math facts, poor spelling, an affinity for learning through stories or talents in music or spatial activities? Does she seem bright when you have class discussions? What is her reading speed?
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Old 11-24-2017, 09:10 PM
 
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Quote:
WGReading, what is this? I just tried to google it but came up empty-handed. Can you please explain or provide a link?
Here is a link. This is not a video I made or my district or anyone I even know. The Body Coding is the motion that goes along with the sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwQDu5HkD8Q

My district has adopted Journeys (the video below is of their sound spelling cards) and we used to use signs that were through an organization called Body Coding, but I don't know that it exists anymore. We call our current gestures "body codes" but they were developed by a team of teachers in our district. They are used district wide so when kids move between schools they are consistent.

As a reading specialist, I love the body codes because sometimes the kids who struggle with decoding will remember the gestures and then recall the sounds. Pairing the body code with the sound and visual of the card gives them a lot of options for making connections as they are learning the sounds and decoding.
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