Difficulty blending initial sound - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Kindergarten

Difficulty blending initial sound

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
ITeachK ITeachK is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 124
Full Member

ITeachK
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 124
Full Member
Difficulty blending initial sound
Old 12-01-2017, 04:20 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I'm looking for ideas to help some of my children to blend the initial consonant in CVC words. Words like pat, cat, and mat are all "at". The same holds true for the -am and -ap word families? Any suggestions or interventions would be greatly appreciated.


ITeachK is offline   Reply With Quote

anna's Avatar
anna anna is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 10,495
Senior Member

anna
 
anna's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 10,495
Senior Member

Old 12-01-2017, 05:28 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

We read first sound,second sound,then blend the first two sounds together .Practice that a few times and then the third sound is added in(on powerpoint). We blend the first two sounds and add the last sound. Do that a few times. Every letter comes up separately on the powerpoint .
anna is offline   Reply With Quote
Sbkangas5's Avatar
Sbkangas5 Sbkangas5 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 5,596
Senior Member

Sbkangas5
 
Sbkangas5's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 5,596
Senior Member

Old 12-01-2017, 05:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Start with words that have "long" sounds (that's not the right term but I can't think of it at the moment) at the beginning - s, m, r, f, l, etc. It's easier for them to blend those at first. Blend the first two sounds a few times, then add the end. If they are having difficulty with blending the first sounds then they aren't ready for word families.
Sbkangas5 is offline   Reply With Quote
ITeachK ITeachK is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 124
Full Member

ITeachK
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 124
Full Member

Old 12-01-2017, 06:57 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I understand what you mean about choosing "long" sound letters but I am following the letters as used in our reading series which leaves these few students struggling with the accompanying stories.
ITeachK is offline   Reply With Quote
iteachk2010's Avatar
iteachk2010 iteachk2010 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,919
Senior Member

iteachk2010
 
iteachk2010's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,919
Senior Member
Practice letter slides
Old 12-03-2017, 08:57 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

We use a program called Reading Horizons. We work with letters in letter groups-4 or 5 consonants with 1 vowel. The students learn letter slides (sliding the consonant with vowel). In Letter Group 1, the lessons are a, b, ba slide, f, fa slide, d, da slide, g, ga slide, real words made with those letters/sounds (bag,dad...) and nonsense words made with those same letters and sounds (*baf, *dag...) In the lesson for individual letters, we learn the letter name, the sound of the letter, a word and we added our own gesture.

If those students already know the letter names and sounds, it might be helpful to focus on the letter slides using physical gesture. When we first learn the letter slide, we put our hand on the opposite shoulder and then slide down to the elbow as we slide those two sounds together. Our program had an arrow underneath the slide to remind students to slide those sounds together. Drill on different letter slides. It is important to work on encoding, too. Say the sounds for the letter slides and have students write the letter slide. Our students draw the slide arrow underneath the letter slides.

The students are taught to use the letter slide when decoding words. i.e. bat We say the letter slide /ba/as we slide hand from shoulder down to elbow. Then we tap the top of the hand as we say the final consonant /t/. Next, we stretch out the sounds especially the vowel as we slide from shoulder all the way to the hand. /baaaaaaaaaaaaaat/. Then we slide the sounds together quickly as we slide from shoulder to hand. /bat/. For encoding, students write the letter slide they hear first and then the final consonant, but you could have your students tap out the individual sounds and write the letters for the sounds.


iteachk2010 is offline   Reply With Quote
luvtulearn luvtulearn is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,434
Senior Member

luvtulearn
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,434
Senior Member
great website
Old 12-03-2017, 03:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Here's an example of blending activities you can find at the Florida Center for Reading Research website:

http://www.fcrr.org/curriculum/pdf/G...inal_Part5.pdf

I use these pictures in conjunction with individual letter cards or magnetic letters to build the word after segmenting it and chunking it.

I also have practice sheets in plastic sleeves where students chunk sounds together ex. ed, ip, an, op,
etc and this is part of their fluency practice from their fluency folder.
luvtulearn is offline   Reply With Quote
ITeachK ITeachK is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 124
Full Member

ITeachK
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 124
Full Member
Reading Horizons
Old 12-04-2017, 12:01 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I'm looking into the Reading Horizons program. It looks like I need the DISCOVERY level manuals. Is that correct? What DISCOVERY levels are Kindergarten manuals?

Thanks!
ITeachK is offline   Reply With Quote
iteachk2010's Avatar
iteachk2010 iteachk2010 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,919
Senior Member

iteachk2010
 
iteachk2010's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,919
Senior Member

Old 12-04-2017, 06:56 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

We have two manuals in kindergarten. We do all of the Chapter 1 Book and parts of the Chapter 2 Book.

The first book is Chapter 1 and works on the five letter groups. (Letter groups have 4-5 consonants and 1 vowel). We name the letters/say the sounds. We learn the letter slides and draw the slide arrows underneath the slides. Then we decode c-v-c words (real and nonsense) and mark an x underneath the vowel in those words.

Chapter 2 covers the following: l-blends, r-blends, s-blends (initial and and final), extra blends tw and ?, doubling s, f and z and plurals, special vowel combinations (-ll, -ng, -nk), antonyms and digraphs (voiced and voiceless th, ch, sh, wh and ph). It introduces the idea of long and short vowel sounds-hearing the sounds, not the different spellings. (In first grade they will learn additional markings to use to decode the words with long vowels.)

Our goal is to finish Chapter 1, introduce blends and digraphs, and be able to identify the short/long vowel sounds by the end of the year. We do not do everything in Chapter 2.

We don't start the program until October. We spend September doing a quick intro to letters/sounds. We work on reciting the alphabet. Our district has an agreed upon word/gesture for each letter. We teach the students a song with each letter name/word/sound/gesture. We work on the letters in students' names first. There is a lot of dictation in this program. Many of our students have never been to preschool and have weak fine motor skills. For some, it is their first time holding a pencil. We spend the time in September developing the fine motor skills, correct pencil grasp and practicing different strokes to prepare our students for the program.
iteachk2010 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Kindergarten
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:27 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net