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Notsurewhatto Notsurewhatto is offline
 
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Ugh! Students not knowing how to play games
Old 12-03-2017, 09:55 AM
 
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I have math groups every week to review concepts, facts, etc but it's wearing me out! This group doesn't know how to play games. I introduce each game and I have group rules that I follow since the beginning of the year but I still have some kids that just can't handle it. Friday, I had one boy throwing the dice, another girl yelling at her teammates because they were not playing right, I had another student tossing the Kaboom! sticks into the cup and the cup going everywhere! By the last rotation I had a headache and felt like a windmill going from group to group to put out fires! I'm tempted to put everyone at their desks with a boring worksheet and take one group at a time just to teach them how to play games again.


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Sounds like you have to!
Old 12-03-2017, 10:12 AM
 
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It's a good idea and a natural consequence.
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Old 12-03-2017, 12:21 PM
 
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Maybe they have not played board and card games at home so they do not know how. Maybe you could model some more.

You can also place dice inside very small plastic containers with lids that are see through. They shake the dice in the container and determine where the die landed but they can't throw the die around the classroom anymore.
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Old 12-03-2017, 12:24 PM
 
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I agree. I would do just that.

In fact, I just did this for centers during ELA. Instead of the class rotating, they did the work at their seats while I pulled reading groups. Like the PP said, it’s a natural consequence. When they demonstrate that they can meet the expectation then they’ll get to rotate through centers again.
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1956 is wise
Old 12-03-2017, 12:25 PM
 
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Those containers of which she speaks are sold at Dollar Tree. They come in a pack of 10.


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Games
Old 12-03-2017, 12:50 PM
 
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I feel your pain. Some of my kids were too competitive, some would cheat. I think they don't know how to play a game and their purpose. I kept reteach ing or sometimes removed a game for a while.

I learned kids don't play with puzzles at home. When I brought mine out they were delighted.
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Strict Ground-Rules
Old 12-03-2017, 01:52 PM
 
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I used to hate hearing students quarreling over board games or any other small group activity, so this is what I did. I simply appointed one assertive student who was familiar with playing the game/activity to be in charge. The leader's job was to explain the rules of the game, help get everyone set up to play and to direct everyone on what to do for the duration of the game. The leader had the authority to expel an uncooperative player from the game at any time. I'd inform the group that if I had to come over to their table due to loud arguments or their unwillingness to follow the leader's directions, then the game would be over. In most cases, peer pressure and quiet civilized discussions enabled most groups to continue playing.

Bottom line: it's extremely critical to communicate strict ground-rules before the games begin.
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Old 12-03-2017, 02:38 PM
 
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They probably do need to be taught how to play games.

I have a lot of games in my classroom, and some kids don't know how to play board games. I assume that they just don't have that experience. Usually there are some kids who do know how to play games who are willing to help them out.

Sometimes I have to teach them how games work. Sometimes I have to teach them game play in general. Sometimes kids just have to do something else.
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Old 12-03-2017, 02:43 PM
 
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Mine don't know how to play games either, This is the first year I have seen this with more than a couple of kids. They all play at the same time trying to play as fast as they can, they don't know how to take turns, roll the dice or get along. I don't think board games are played in as many homes as they used to be. It means I have to spend a lot of time teaching how to play games before we can learn specific games and rules.
1. Learning to wait your turn- go around the table taking turns covering numbers or pictures (no dice or anything, it doesn't matter what they are covering, the point was to practice waiting their turn.
2. Learning to roll dice- yes a whole lesson and practice on roll dice. Just have them roll the dice and cover the number, on their own.
3. Put the two together, take turns rolling the dice and cover the number, no winner no missing turns
4. Good sportsmanship- Teach them how to shake hands and say "good game" I do a whole lesson with modelling and showing them examples of sore loser and winners and talking about that. Then practice shaking hands with people on each side and saying good game. Then play a quick game I like roll the dice put that many objects on their (mitten, snowman, tree....) winner has more. shake hands say good game play again. Lots of practice being a good sport.

We sometimes need to go back and do one or more of these lessons at times just to remind yourselves. It has been an interesting year, but these lessons helped my Kinders and made games more enjoyable for all of us.
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Old 12-03-2017, 02:53 PM
 
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I was going to suggest containers for the dice also. They work really well.

I would have a meeting and explain why they will not have games for a while. Give them seat work. Then slowly introduce one game at a time. Go over the rules (not just of the games, but how it looks and sounds when they play games). Only allow one group of students to play while the others do seat work. Choose students who will be good role models. Afterwards meet again and talk about what went well. The next day have two groups play, and so on. If at any time a group cannot follow the rules, quietly tell them to put the game away and have a worksheet ready to go.


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Cross-Age Helpers
Old 12-03-2017, 11:35 PM
 
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Since your students are in the 3rd grade, you may want to consider recruiting a couple of responsible 5th grade students to serve as "game leaders" as I described in my previous response. It worked well for me and should work for you too. Don't forget to establish the ground rules.
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Old 12-04-2017, 05:49 PM
 
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I also use a little box for the dice. Students must roll the dice into the box. If the diice hit the floor then they miss a turn. I spent a lot of time teaching them how to play a game and how to be a good sport. If they are still tantruming after a few lessons, then they are immediatlely removed from the game. THey learn fairly quickly how to control their emotions.
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Old 12-05-2017, 11:17 AM
 
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I agree with those who said to assign a group leader. Hopefully, you have at least 3 or 4 students who follow the rules. This even worked for me when I taught pre-k. The kids who followed the rules were the group leaders. The other kids wanted this cool job, so they tried harder to follow directions and not cheat or goof off. It was good motivation for them to follow directions and not pout.
I like the idea of having a few older kids come in to help facilitate. Sometimes kids learn quicker when other kids are teaching them.
I also had rewards for the group that followed directions
Putting the dice in a clear plastic container is a great method as well.
I give them 2 chances, and if they can't play correctly, they can sit at their desk quietly and work on handwriting or a worksheet.
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Socialization
Old 12-07-2017, 06:35 PM
 
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The kids don't know how to play any games that are multi-player, or that involve turn-taking. They spend all their time on solitary play video games! You have to teach them a group at a time, or else they will fall apart.
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