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hiker1 hiker1 is offline
 
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Adhd
Old 12-09-2017, 08:56 AM
 
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I have a student that displays severe ADHD but is not on meds. Mom isn't the greatest parent either. The student can be very sweet but drives me up the wall with his antics. He's always up and out of his seat, bothering others, etc. Yesterday he was off task for 20 of the 30 minutes I was attempting to work one to one with him. He has several pages of unfinished work because he does not focus on his assignments and won't accept one to one help. His homework is always done incorrectly, yet when I sit with him, he does it correctly. I am serioulsy considering having him complete all of his missing assignments before he takes part in any Holiday activity. All of his grades are D's and F's yet when he sits one to one he will get A's and B's. There are no consequences at home and he always plays the victim. Nothing is his fault. When he realizes that I am holding him to high standards and making him redo his failing work he sobs loudly for his mom. He frustrates me yet I truly like him and see potential if he is on medication. If his family doesn't get his ADHD under control I really fear for his future. I hate being the bad guy but I refuse to allow him to participate in fun activities when all he does is goof around in class then get upset when he has a consequence. I'm preparing for a very long last day of school when he is finishing all his work. Funny thing though, it's not that much work and if he is able to put forth as much effort as he does in work avoidance into these assginments, he should be finished within 45 minutes. Knowing him though, we'll be together for a few hours.


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Old 12-09-2017, 09:51 AM
 
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I think hildingbjos accountable is a good idea. However, with the ADHD, thereís no way heíll be able to sit and do it all in one sitting. Youíd be better served breaking it into smaller, more manageable tasks.

I totally understand about fearing for his future. I had 2 that Iím certain will be self medicating. One mom refused to see it and one the parents were looking at ďalternative methodsĒ. Thatís all well and good, but the kid literally couldnít sit still. He paced in my room all day. It had to have been exhausting being in that body. In both those cases, the parents were failing the kids. They were going to find something to calm their overactive bodies. If it wasnít prescriptive, it was going to be on the streets.
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A few thoughts
Old 12-09-2017, 10:05 AM
 
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You'll need to announce the intent to withhold holiday activities well in advance so he has ample time to finish the work. That needs to go to him and to mom, both. And as Greyhound said, there's no way he can do it in one sitting. You need to decide what he absolutely has to do and divide it into several sessions.

Honestly, I wonder whether withholding the fun is the best idea. Assuming he really does have ADHD (not our diagnosis to make, and I'm sure you know that), then he can't control himself. On the other hand, failing an ADHD diagnosis, you can only manage the behaviors, of course. Are there ways you can accommodate his activity level without crossing boundaries? For example, let him stand as he works or do something physical every 5 minutes?
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Old 12-09-2017, 03:18 PM
 
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Believe me he has had ample opportunitiy to finish his work. I give him opportunities every day to finish the work. He'll sit there and just watch the rest of the class, play with his pencil, break the lead, tear off the eraser etc. His mom is no use or any help. Last time I told her that he had a difficult morning she just looked at me and said nothing. I don't tell his mom about his behaviors that much or I woud be talking to her every single day. Also, his behavior impedes his classmates ability to learn and enjoy other activities. Although I advocate for the students in the sped program, I also don't think that one child should cause an entire class to erupt into chaos.
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A Different Approach
Old 12-10-2017, 01:09 AM
 
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As a former intervention specialist, I used to seek out students in the school who were having difficulty with the standard curriculum. This post and the responses to it remind me of two students in particular who had similar issues. I purposely refrained from making any assumptions about new students in order to discover their capabilities.

John was a 6th grade student with severe ADHD who was in the SDC program (Self-contained day class). This tall, heavy-set boy had 4th grade reading skills, but could only sit still for about two minutes before he would jump out of his seat and prance around the classroom.

Karen was a 2nd grade student with moderate autism who spent the first half of the school year crouched beneath a table or huddled in a remote, relatively quiet corner of her classroom. She showed all the classic autistic behaviors: jumping up spontaneously to run around the room while screaming, flailing her arms, rocking in chair, fluttering fingers and staring up at the ceiling or looking away to avoid eye contact. Her teacher also reported Karen's inability to sit for more than a couple of minutes before she too was out-of-seat. Special chairs and bands for her legs didn't help at all.

Both special ed. students were introduced to a series of multisensory reading lessons that I created on my laptop. The self-narrated lessons included an interactive conversational format with animated text and relevant images that appeared on the screen according to timed sequences. Not only were the highly-structured lessons fast-paced, but they also challenged the students with new grammatical structures, advanced vocabulary and spelling activities.

John immediately found the initial lesson to be highly engaging and interacted with the program for a full 40 minutes until his teacher came to retrieve him from my room.

From day 1, Karen also had no difficulty sitting for 30-40 minutes before getting up to stretch. Like John, she was riveted to the multi-sensory digital lessons and had no difficulty completing 30-minute lessons that included oral language development, reading and writing. Surprisingly, whenever she was preoccupied with the lessons, Karen didn't display any of her usual autistic behaviors - she was my top student who easily learned to read text at the high school level.

Both students thoroughly enjoyed working independently on the computer reading and writing! Karen could even write coherent paragraphs.

What I learned: Some of the most disruptive, undisciplined gen. ed. students and the most challenging special ed. students respond well to digital multi-sensory lessons and are capable of progressing up a steep learning curve. These students often require a different approach to succeed academically.



Last edited by Ucan; 12-10-2017 at 09:36 AM..
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RetiredKat RetiredKat is online now
 
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adhd
Old 12-10-2017, 02:45 AM
 
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One strategy that might help is to bring the child into the hall before he starts an assignment. Tell him he's not in trouble, you just want him to work off some of that extra energy that he has and you wish you had. He could do jumping jacks, run in place, or even walk up and down the hall.

You might want to try a balance ball but only allow him to use it if he keeps his two feet on the floor.

Another possibility are figit bands that attach to the front legs of his chair. IMO, I think they are rather expensive but maybe someone very creative could devise a homemade version. Squeeze balls could be helpful.
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teabreak teabreak is offline
 
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Does he have to sit?
Old 12-10-2017, 12:39 PM
 
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Students with ADHD (unmedicated or not) need the movement and more brain breaks than we think are necessary. Can he stand and give you oral answers, can he focus more on a different kind of seat? Something like a wobble seat or textured seat cushion? Have you tried "If...then" statements? Things like "If you do these 10 math problems without getting up, then you get 5 minutes to pace the back of the room." He needs to have the frequent breaks if he is displaying this kind of behavior.

Kids like this need to move. Most of the time they really are paying attention, it just doesn't look like it to those that don't have ADHD or the symptoms of ADHD. Since I am a special education teacher, I get the fantastic opportunity to work with many students that are diagnosed with ADHD. Medication is not always the answer for them, but helping teach and learn strategies they can use for life is a good start. Do you have someone in your district that specialized in ADD/ADHD? I would start with them. If there is no specialist, talk to your special education team. They are a great resource as this is generally a diagnosis that can qualify a student for specially designed instruction. They may have some more great ideas for you and the student to try.
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Old 12-11-2017, 06:33 AM
 
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Initiation is a hallmark sign of ADHD. For some this is their worst deficit. Once engaged they can get things done, but getting them there is difficult.
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:55 PM
 
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I think you are bang on, holding this student accountable for his behaviour. You have made reasonable accommodations for him to complete his work, and he chooses not to accept your help. Sounds like the parents will be of little help either. There doesn't seem to be any other option but to make the special event contingent upon completing an agreed upon amount of missed assignments. It's unfortunate and difficult to do, but he will respect you for it later.
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teabreak
Old 12-12-2017, 05:26 AM
 
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I love you for this:

Quote:
Since I am a special education teacher, I get the fantastic opportunity to work with many students that are diagnosed with ADHD.


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hiker1 hiker1 is offline
 
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Success!
Old 12-12-2017, 02:44 PM
 
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He and I sat together for short bits today and he finished all of his work! I knew he was able to do it. On a side note his mom wants him labeled with ODD and a cognitive disablity so she can get SSI. THis infuriates me since he is not ODD, just unmedicated ADHD, and he is working on grade level or slightly below. Mom wants the money when the easiest and most logical thing to do is fix the ADHD.

Last edited by hiker1; 12-12-2017 at 02:48 PM.. Reason: Added more.
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Adhd
Old 12-12-2017, 03:11 PM
 
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We have several students diagnosed with severe ADHD and their parents are choosing not to medicate. As a parent myself, I understand being reticent to medicate your child, and before medication I would do whatever possible to support the school in handling the behaviour modification/training process, but after a couple of years of teachers telling me that my child canít do ANYTHING without one to one support, and is failing to show any academic progress....itís time to go to the DOCTOR!!!! I find supporting students with severe, unmedicated ADHD to be incredibly challenging and infuriating. If someone knows any good books or resources with successful strategies for training these kids to focus, get organized and initiate/finish their work Iíd love to know!
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