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twin2 twin2 is offline
 
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Visual cues
Old 07-25-2018, 06:54 PM
 
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What are some visual cues that you use to minimize interruptions while teaching?


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Visual Cues
Old 07-27-2018, 09:45 AM
 
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A casual walk-by of the posted class rules / expectations, with a quick tap on the one in question, accompanied by a pointed look at the offender. All without missing a beat while teaching and without uttering a single word about the infraction.
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Old 07-27-2018, 04:53 PM
 
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I put magnetic numbers one through four up on the board. If there is an interruption, I silently remove the number four. If there is another, I remove the number three (and so on). At the end of my mini-lesson, we look to see how many numbers are left. This is how many sticks we pull out of our Kerplunk game. The students know once the marbles fall they will receive a reward. The goal is to keep all of the numbers on the board in order to remove more sticks.
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Old 07-27-2018, 06:05 PM
 
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These are nice ideas. I truly want to learn to use visual cues so that my teaching is not interrupted when a minor misbehavior occurs.
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Old 07-28-2018, 06:21 PM
 
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Proximity. There is a direct relationship between where the teacher is and how students behave. That is, distance is safety while proximity is accountability. If one works the crowd - constantly moving among students while teaching - to check work, answer questions etc. setting limits with your body will look natural. Pausing a little longer next to the desk of the offender and/or stopping to teach from there will put the student on notice. The student would have to be really looking for a fight to continue goofing off with the teacher six inches away. And since the teacher is constantly moving the class will never know a discipline number just occurred. Proximity may not seem like much of a "technique" until you observe in a classroom where the teacher doesn't move.


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silent signals
Old 07-29-2018, 04:04 PM
 
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I use silent signals in my classroom. 1 finger - I have a question, 2 fingers - I need to leave my seat, 3 fingers - I need to use the restroom. I have found these work great to minimize distractions - and to stop 15 kids from suddenly having to use the restroom.
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Old 08-02-2018, 03:54 AM
 
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I also use silent signals. 1=tissue, 2=restroom, 3=I need help. And I do a silent countdown from 5-4-3-2-1 with my fingers when needed. Since my class will be much smaller this year, and I'm looping with my 2nd graders, I know I won't have to do much to get their attention.
Sometimes I just stand somewhere in front and say the word "Now" in a strong voice (not loud!), and wait quietly.

During teaching, I work the room too, do a dramatic pause, talk really soft, sing my words, talk with an accent....one or two of these should be enough to keep their attention! Also, making sure the lesson doesn't drag keeps them engaged and involving them as much as possible!
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Old 08-02-2018, 12:28 PM
 
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When I started teaching I noticed students would raise hand for help then sit and wait. Others would not raise hand for help due to fear of being singled out in front of peers. This is what I did when I was in school. I didn't want anyone to know I didn't understand so I would rush through my work to cover up. Often students would be waiting minutes especially if I was helping another student. Also, some students take this to mean "I can't work since I have only one hand to do so".

I gave each student a 5x7 index card which is folded like a tent. On one side they put ? and other Done. Card is on their desk. Card turned down = working. Card up with ? showing = help. Card up with Done showing = finished. In addition to freeing both hands to keep working it keeps helping interactions less public. Shy students began to ask more questions, and it helped to eliminate hands waving around the room while students wait for the teacher.
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Old 08-02-2018, 04:20 PM
 
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I love these ideas so far. Thank you.
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Old 08-02-2018, 07:16 PM
 
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I taught Early Childhood Special Education and used signs--stop, sit, stand, eat, etc. My signing ability is pretty much at the four year old level!


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Old 08-04-2018, 12:58 PM
 
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I had to use only visual cues one year when I taught a student 5 year old who would lash out and escalate if anyone said anything about his behavior-even gentle class wide reminders of the rules that didn't single him out or the most gentle private conversations.

I used signal cards. When kids weren't following the procedures and expectations for learning I would walk over and put the card on their work area. We had 4 basic expectations associated with an animal. Yes I taught kinder then.

Learner expectations were:
Gentle paws(basically hands to your self and feet on the floor)-dog, Not a peep (No talking out of turn)-duckling, tails down(sit our bottom)-cat, and eagle eye (check your work-it might need correction)-an eagle obviously.

I made 6-8 of each of them from card stock and I laminated them 3 times in case he got made and wanted to ripe them up-he didn't though he responded much more calmly to visual cues. It worked well.

I have used similar things with my big kids who worked better with visual signals but its just colored cards with the expectation on one side and simple image of it on the other. I walk by and place it on the desk or in their hand.

Last edited by Kinderkr4zy; 08-05-2018 at 06:38 AM..
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Old 08-04-2018, 05:06 PM
 
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This idea is more for the younger students. I went to a workshop one time where the teacher took pictures of her class posing in doing things the correct way. For example, if it's time to line up at the end of the day she would have a picture for each step she wants them to do, ie 1. come get a copy of the homework page from me 2. check your mailbox for papers going home 3 pack your backpack 4 check your desk for items you left behind that you wanted to take home 5 get in line straight, facing such and such direction, etc. So when it was the end of the day she would click on the "end of day" page and all the numbered pictures would pop up on her smart board from her computer. This could be done at any time of day that there are multiple steps to follow, such as first thing in the morning routine, starting centers, or whatever. Once made, they can be saved and reused all year. I never did it, but am thinking of trying it this year, as it gets old to have to give multiple verbal reminders! This could encourage successful independence.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:37 AM
 
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Interruption/Kerplunck game:

This is truly genius! I'm going to use this with a difficult 7th grade class.
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