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Fun Board Games...
Old 09-16-2018, 05:27 PM
 
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Hi,

I teach a mild/moderately cognitively delayed, multi-grade class (4th-6th grade).

Iím looking for suggestions for fun board games...

I was thinking of Candyland, Chutes and Ladders or Apples to Apples.

Do you guys have any other recommendations?

Thanks!


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Old 09-16-2018, 06:04 PM
 
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My students love Jenga, Candy Land, and Uno. I've made the Jenga into an academic game before by saying that students have to correctly answer a (review) question before they pull a piece out.

A few years ago I also made several word bingo games that follow different patterns- like one for CVC, one for silent e, one for blends, etc. I use these as a reward at the end of lessons if students are following directions and staying on task- I explain that we'll have a few extra minutes at the end if I don't constantly have to stop and tell people to have their eyes on me, voices off, etc.

My kids LOVE them even though it is really just a different way to practice their reading, and they never get tired of them even though I tend to have kids for multiple years. Last year I also made some number ones for different groups (numbers 1-20, 2 and 3 digit numbers, etc.) I got a super cheap bingo chip set with a magnetic wand, and whoever wins that game gets to use the magnetic wand to pick up the chips. They never tire of that either.

FWIW, my students don't have cognitive disabilities and I've found apples to apples to be extremely challenging for them, and I have the kids version. I'm K-3 now, but have taught older kids in the past and it was very difficult. I think if you use that, I'd make it more of an instructional focus than using it as a fun game reward or something like that.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:33 PM
 
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My students really like the Sequences games - the junior version for some, and the State version for others. We also play sight word bingo, Mancala, and a nicer version of Old Maid.

And... I'm so sick of UNO! I can't wait for retirement just so that I never have to play it again!
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Games
Old 09-17-2018, 03:03 AM
 
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Connect Four

Bugged Out, which is like Jenga, but teaches colors and is a little more structured than typical Jenga

Dominoes

any type of marble run

Yeti Spaghetti

Don't Break the Ice

Guess Who (kind of frustrating for some kids on the spectrum)
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Like Haley mentioned,
Old 09-17-2018, 04:54 AM
 
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there are lots of ways to modify store bought or established games so they are academic in nature. I too have a modified the Jenga game (2X-sight words/math facts) and there are even more ways to modify the Candy Land game.

I bought several copies of some games so I can modify them in different ways.

TPT has several sets of sight word cards for Candyland that you can just print out and laminate. You can also use a sharpie to modify the game board and leave the cards as is.

Guess who? is another game that is fun as is and has many modifications.
As is, it is about generalizing and attention to detail as well as sorting, inference, grouping/subgrouping, and more. There are also cards out there that can be subbed in to have a more academic purpose.

You can also google ways to use dice and playing cards as math practice too.

For some reason, playing a game (instead of flashcards or worksheets) takes the pressure off.


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Life Skills Trivia Pursuit
Old 09-17-2018, 03:14 PM
 
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I bought the Life Skills Trivia Pursuit game from teachers pay teachers. You use the Trivia pursuit game board and game pieces, but the questions are real world.
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Spot It!
Old 09-18-2018, 03:49 PM
 
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Spot It is my absolute favorite - both because it is fun and it involves visual processing and discrimination. It can also be used to practice phonics or vocabulary for students with Emerging skills. There are lots of different versions, so you could find some that would be appropriate for your student population.
It is even fun for adults - teachers at my school have been known to play every now and then even without the kids!
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Old 09-18-2018, 03:56 PM
 
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I teach a similar population, slightly younger (4th grade). I love HedBanz (for expressive language and vocabulary), What Should You Do - A Game of Consequences (Lakeshore or Amazon), as well as Social Skills Board Games published by Didax. Especially love the last one, it comes with 6 separate sturdy board games that teach concepts like empathy, good decision making, and friendship skills. This is my second year with my students (had them in 3rd last year, got moved up with them this) and they actually REQUEST to play the social skills games over anything else in my room during indoor recess/"fun Friday" lol. You or an aide will definitely want to run these games with them; it will give you a lot of insight into your kids' social thinking processes!
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Old 09-22-2018, 01:57 PM
 
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Shape UP ( purchased on Fat Brain Toys website) is by far the favorite. Kids have to match shapes to their game board.
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