A rose by any other name... - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Substitute Teachers

A rose by any other name...

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,449
Senior Member

MaineSub
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,449
Senior Member
A rose by any other name...
Old 01-19-2020, 05:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Here's an opinion piece from my blog... offered as something to think about. (I teach a Substitute Teacher Workshop and have written a handbook for it... that's why I received the message mentioned.)
***

For the unfamiliar, the title of this post is a quote from William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The full quote is “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” It is often quoted to make the point that what something is called does not change its characteristics or attributes.

I thought of it because I received a message that suggested I should stop referring to “Substitute Teachers” and instead call them “Guest Teachers.” The suggestion included the observation that ” when kids hear “substitute,” they don’t always have respect because you’re “just a sub.”

I also remembered an incident I experienced while subbing (not guesting) in a second-grade classroom. I was surrounded by a cluster of kids, one of whom was examining the badge I wear on a lanyard around my neck. After a fairly lengthy examination, he said, “Mr. B, your badge is wrong.” Thinking this might be a teachable moment, I examined it myself. All that was on it was my name and “Substitute Teacher.”

So we studied it together until I admitted I couldn’t find the mistake. He said, quite matter-of-factly, “It says you’re a substitute teacher. That’s wrong. You’re a real teacher.”

I floated through the rest of the day and announced at the office they could keep my pay for the day. (They didn’t.)

The problem kids sometimes have with subs–and subs have with those kids–is not the title. It’s the kids’ past experience with subs in general.

I recall one day when for some reason we had a lot of subs at school, including some who hadn’t yet learned routines and a few who were clearly “out of their element.” At recess, I realized every adult on duty with me was a sub. When I left that day, I joked at the office that having subs was a real pain and challenge! And I also left with an appreciation for why kids might “dread” having a sub.

Calling the sub a “Guest Teacher” isn’t likely to change that. In fact, I don’t want to be a guest at school. I am not a guest. I’m a member of the faculty/staff. I don’t want to hear the kids say, “You’re just a guest.” I’d rather be thought of as a teacher who is substituting for another teacher.

I hear some districts are adopting this approach–I truly do not understand what they think they are accomplishing, other than some subs seem to think it is more dignified. Fortunately, the districts in this area are still hiring subs. I hope they continue.

Of course in the grand scheme of things what those of us who substitute are called won’t matter as much as what we do while we’re there. I think I’ll worry more about that than what I’m called.


MaineSub is offline   Reply With Quote

Song of Joy Song of Joy is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,352
Senior Member

Song of Joy
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,352
Senior Member

Old 01-19-2020, 06:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I agree. Kids respond to the experience they have with the substitute teacher and people define their title by how they act.
Song of Joy is offline   Reply With Quote
luv2teach2017 luv2teach2017 is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member

luv2teach2017
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member

Old 01-19-2020, 08:01 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I can see your point, MaineSub. You're right that no matter what you're called, it doesn't change who or what you are.

However, I also know that over time, some terms become labels that can carry a certain stigma. The label "sub" or "substitute teacher" is one of those. It's not a matter of whether or not it's an accurate description of the role. I have no problem with the concept of being a "substitute" for the regular teacher. But due to lots of negative media hype and a few bad apples, the term "substitute teacher" has become badly tainted. At least that's been my observation.

The most common solution to removing a stigma is to change the name to something more agreeable. Maybe the new name is a euphemism. But for a while, this change of terms helps dispel the negative stereotypes. We're all familiar with those changes in terms.

In a past life, I worked for a time as a technical writer contractor. I would work for corporations for extended periods ranging from months to years. I was referred to as a "contractor" in general, but occasionally a coworker would refer disparagingly to me as a "temp." The term "contractor" carried a certain respect. The term "temp" implied that I was poorly educated and unskilled, a day-to-day fill in. I knew the implication and would explain that I was a "contractor" and expected to be referred to as such.

When I first started as a substitute teacher, i was pleased to hear district and school staff refer to me as a "guest teacher." To me, the term carried respect and willingness to abandon the "sub" stereotype. My badge also said "guest teacher." However, I've since noticed that students often use the term "sub" as a negative label, even a put down .

I don't blame the children. I blame the adults who have modeled this for them. I have often overheard aides, yard duty and cafeteria staff, even teachers making rude, even hurtful remarks about "subs" without caring that I was within earshot. If I'm hearing these remarks, the children are too. It does a disservice to us all. It means we're always fighting against the current of negative stereotypes, having to prove them wrong day after day.

We teach the children that they must not use racial slurs or use outdated labels to refer to LGBTQ or the disabled. Words are just words. It's the connotations that they carry that do the damage. That's why we teach children not to use the "n" word or call people "fags" or "retards" or the myriad of other stigmatized terms that have become ways to demean and marginalize others who are different than ourselves.

I believe the term "sub" has become one of those stigmatized terms, and I give credit to those districts that are trying to give us our due respect by abandoning the label.

When I walk into a new school, I immediately know how I will be treated by whether the staff calls me a "sub" or a "guest teacher." If they call me "guest teacher," I am encouraged. To me it means they are mindful. Even though I may be there for just a day, I'm someone to be treated with respect and consideration.

Maybe the problem is that we haven't yet come up with anything to replace "sub," which is also now a verb. We don't "guest" for a class. It's easier to just say we "sub" or "are subbing" or "are a sub." But I think it's worth a try to keep seeking ways to shed the stereotypes and labels.

When I walk into an unfamiliar classroom, I would have a much easier time if I didn't have to address the negative stereotype. Usually the first thing I hear is the children saying "Oh, we have a sub" or "Are you a sub?" I start by explaining that I am not a "sub;" I'm a teacher, and my name is not "sub." My name is "Ms. X." This "lecture" has become an opening routine for me now. It helps set a respectful tone from the start.

I know I got on my soapbox here, but your topic really pushed buttons for me. I think it's worth discussing on this forum. Thank you for your post, MaineSub!

Last edited by luv2teach2017; 01-19-2020 at 10:46 AM..
luv2teach2017 is offline   Reply With Quote
SubMan SubMan is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,605
Senior Member

SubMan
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,605
Senior Member

Old 01-19-2020, 11:26 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I find that I am regarded as a teacher in buildings where I (substitute) teach a lot. In buildings I infrequently get to Iím regarded as just a sub. In buildings where I am frequently I typically donít have problems with the students or staff.

The age and gender of the staff has a lot to do with the level of respect I receive. In one primary center I go to there is so much male bashing going on that it is a school of last resort; the principal and all of the staff are female. The principal seems appreciative of my being there, the teachers act as if Iím senile; ďYou. Need. To. Go. To. The. Gym. To. Pick. Up. My. Class. Do. You. Understand?Ē The principal is older than I am while the teachers are young enough to be recent college grads.

The best building/district I go to calls their substitutes, Teachers. We wear badges that say ďTeacherĒ but lack a photo. These are identical to what a new staff member would wear until they received their picture ID.

In districts where I teach ďguest teachersĒ are typically emergency certified adult with a BA or BS degree in any field. Some Iíve seen are good, some are not. Some think itís an easy way to pick up a few dollars.

In the end I donít think it matters much what they call us, some titles carry more weight than others. Unfortunately, all it takes is one bad sub to yell, scream, lose control, threaten to send a student to the principal or call the school resource officer to have a child removed to cast a long shadow on all substitute teachers.
SubMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Lenoral
 
 
Guest

Lenoral
 
 
Guest
A Teacher in Limbo
Old 01-19-2020, 12:24 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

A Teacher in Limbo.That's what I call myself. For me, a substitute is not a permanent situation. I'm either between jobs, or I'll be subbing before retirement. Substitute Teacher is other title I use. I am nobody's guest. I
signed up for the assignment.


  Reply With Quote
bodhimom bodhimom is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

bodhimom
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

Old 01-19-2020, 12:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I do not like to be called a "guest teacher."

I realize they are trying to make it seem fancy, but I'm a sub. Just call me a sub. I don't need people to blow smoke up my butt, though I appreciate that they are trying, and apparently, some subs like it.

It might be the southern thing, again. We don't need to have our title inflated. Now, if I could be called my actual NAME, that I would enjoy!

I guess it is along the lines of the trashman being called a "sanitation engineer.". I guess it is important for some people, but not me. I actually get embarrassed when someone calls me a "guest teacher," though I never say anything. I thought I was the only one, until I read the op.
bodhimom is offline   Reply With Quote
luv2teach2017 luv2teach2017 is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member

luv2teach2017
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member
Another example
Old 01-19-2020, 04:20 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

For a few years, I used to teach classes part-time, as an adjunct instructor, at some local colleges. Even though my work was classified as part-time, temporary, I was referred to as an "instructor." There were no second-rate designations to devalue my role.

In thinking about it, I believe we all, whether part-time or full-time, should simply be called "teachers." No further distinctions needed.
luv2teach2017 is offline   Reply With Quote
bodhimom bodhimom is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

bodhimom
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

Old 01-19-2020, 04:59 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

You were called an instructor because you were an instructor. Day-to-day subs are not teachers.
bodhimom is offline   Reply With Quote
luv2teach2017 luv2teach2017 is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member

luv2teach2017
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member

Old 01-19-2020, 07:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

Quote:
Day-to-day subs are not teachers
I disagree. I don't know about you, but I sub elementary and my days are full of teaching. Many of us take long-term assignments as well.

( BTW: If we do not teach, then why call us "substitute teachers"? )
luv2teach2017 is offline   Reply With Quote
bodhimom bodhimom is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

bodhimom
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

Old 01-19-2020, 08:06 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Your days are full of teaching what you are instructed to teach. A teacher makes sub plans, worries about test scores, attends iep's, attends staff meetings, worries about observations, worries about getting tenure, and much more. A daily sub follows somebody else's plans for a day and goes home when the bell rings.

We are called substitute teachers because we are substituting for the teacher - we are not THE teacher.

I consider long term subs to be teachers, because that is what they are doing - they ARE teachers. Day-to-day subs are a far cry from a teacher.

I've been both.

Not saying that day-to-day subs don't have their own issues, but being a teacher isn't one of them.

Obviously, some daily subs want to be called teachers, and nothing I can say will change their mind, and I'm not even going to try. Others can call me a "guest teacher," but I'm a sub.


bodhimom is offline   Reply With Quote
MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,449
Senior Member

MaineSub
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,449
Senior Member
Thanks...
Old 01-20-2020, 03:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Thanks for some very interesting and thought-provoking comments. Several observations come to mind... I do certainly understand and agree that words often carry a stigma with them. I'm just not sure changing the word eliminates the stigma. And, I fear that changing the word (label) provides a false sense of satisfaction and accomplishment.

There's also an interesting discussion around whether we identify with a label or the label becomes our identity.

We are also seeing the truth that words don't mean--people give meaning (and sometimes importance) to words. Is there a linguist on the forum?

I respectfully but totally disagree that a sub is not a teacher. At the root level, a teacher is one who teaches. Subs (well, some) teach. In fact, on this board we sometimes distinguish between the "substitute teacher" and the "regular teacher." Maybe the issue is how we distinguish the two roles--that's one reason I've not minded the label "substitute teacher." It's accurate. I am a teacher who substitutes for the "regular teacher." (I'm not sure most teachers would like to called a "regular teacher," though. )

Sometimes asking the right question is more important than finding the right answer. In this case, asking the question makes us think about who we actually are.

Take out your thesaurus and turn to page... relief teacher? reserve teacher? surrogate teacher? temporary teacher? deputy teacher? stand-by teacher? stand-in teacher? back-up teacher? OOO! We could get really fancy and be "locum tenens."

Quote:
Language matters because whoever controls the words controls the conversation, because whoever controls the conversation controls its outcome, because whoever frames the debate has already won it, because telling the truth has become harder and harder to achieve in an America drowning in Orwellian Newspeak
Erica Jong
MaineSub is offline   Reply With Quote
luv2teach2017 luv2teach2017 is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member

luv2teach2017
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member
"think about who we actually are"
Old 01-20-2020, 08:32 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Thanks, MaineSub, for the topic and your last post. I especially like your Erica Jong quote:
Quote:
Language matters because whoever controls the words controls the conversation, because whoever controls the conversation controls its outcome, because whoever frames the debate has already won it, because telling the truth has become harder and harder to achieve in an America drowning in Orwellian Newspeak
I think we're living in a virtual "Tower of Babel" era, where nobody speaks the same language anymore. We use the same words, but one person's definitions do not match another's. Somewhere in all the confusion, the "truth" gets lost.

I am especially sensitive to the words "substitute teacher because of the stigma I believe has become attached to the label. The stigma I've perceived is exactly what prevented me from trying this work in the past.

I've loved to "teach"--meaning "helping others learn"--pretty much all my life. As an adult, I've been a teacher in many capacities--as a tutor and later a TA in college, a college adjunct instructor, a corporate trainer, a private tutor, an ESL/Civics instructor for a nonprofit.

A few years ago, I even went back to school and completed my pre-service coursework and CSET test requirements for a public school teaching credential. Although I've had my substitute teaching credential for over 20 years, it wasn't until 4 years ago that I finally decided to give subbing a try.

At first, I subbed all grade levels, but much to my surprise, it was the lower elementary grades that I enjoyed most. Why? Because I had the opportunity to actually teach children who are still receptive to learning. And yes, I mean "teach."

Yes, the lesson plans are (usually) set out for me, but the lesson plans only explain WHAT to teach, not HOW. The challenge for me is to make sure I understand the material, determine how best to present it, and then have a Plan B and Plan C in case the students are not "getting it." This is the meat of what I do.

I love finding and using various strategies and using props, if needed. I float about the room and give extra help to those who need it by finding ways to simplify for them. Sometimes I'll take time during recess or after class to help students who need extra help understanding their lessons. If that isn't being a teacher, what is? (I might add that even the full-time teachers are "told" what to teach, when, what, and how to test, and even given the textbooks and tests they must use.)

Even though I enjoy this work, I am still hesitant to tell people I'm a "substitute teacher" because as soon as I do, I usually see the disappointment and judgement in their eyes. So I just say I'm a teacher and leave it at that.

And yes, I am a teacher. It's not a job. It's a passion for me. Maybe some think "teacher" means someone who is employed full-time with benefits for a school district and put in charge of a class long-term. But I go for the broader definition: someone who is skilled at helping others learn.

I realize that there are people employed as "teachers" (both substitute and full-time) who are just doing it for the pay check. I've met a few myself. But that shouldn't cast a shadow on those who are genuinely invested in this important work. In truth, no label or title can distinguish one type from the other. But I guarantee you, the students know the difference.

Last edited by luv2teach2017; 01-20-2020 at 09:15 AM..
luv2teach2017 is offline   Reply With Quote
Lakeside's Avatar
Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 5,197
Senior Member

Lakeside
 
Lakeside's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 5,197
Senior Member

Old 01-20-2020, 01:51 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Quote:
Maybe some think "teacher" means someone who is employed full-time with benefits for a school district and put in charge of a class long-term. But I go for the broader definition: someone who is skilled at helping others learn.
I love this! What a great definition, luv2teach2017.

Like you, I've held many different teaching roles over the years (subbing, CCD, Cub Scouts, tutoring...) and I've always considered myself a "real" teacher. - I just choose to teach part-time.

I'm still very invested in my students' success (and I do think of them as "my" students - while I don't have the same kids day to day, I do have many of them year-to-year, which I find extremely rewarding.)


As to the original post - I really don't care whether I'm called a substitute teacher or guest teacher at school. But I do find that mentioning my job title outside of school tends to lead to a certain level of judgement - as if I'm wasting my education or something.
Lakeside is offline   Reply With Quote
Sublime Sublime is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,268
Senior Member

Sublime
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,268
Senior Member

Old 01-20-2020, 02:31 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

I guess I don't care if I'm called a sub or guest teacher. Other people might have negative associations with the word but I don't and I don't care what other people think about it. Perhaps it is because I have had few negative associations with the word that it doesn't bother me. Short of forbidding everyone from using the word "substitute" that's what we will always be.
Sublime is offline   Reply With Quote
Fractured Fractured is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 331
Full Member

Fractured
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 331
Full Member

Old 01-20-2020, 06:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

My last job on Friday was in a school that had the guest teacher tag. I do notice that the schools I’m in that make that effort usually have a better attitude towards subs/kids are easier to handle, but of course that is not always true. I don’t need to be called it, but it makes you feel a little better about where you’re at.

I find it interesting that some subs don’t think of themselves as teachers. Yeah, we don’t write the plans but we are still teaching the material. Of course there are days where you play a film or just babysit, but there are also days where you are actually doing what the teacher would be doing if they were in the classroom. I usually let the kids know what my license area is in and if they are writing an essay or something similar I offer to help them if they are stuck, or if they want me to read over their stuff. They ask me how to spell words or about grammar. If I know the book, I try to help them if they are stuck. The same goes for history or film. If there’s a chance for me to teach, I will do it. It beats sitting around and doing nothing for hours, which this job can definitely ask us to do sometimes.
Fractured is offline   Reply With Quote
Aillya Aillya is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 107
Full Member

Aillya
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 107
Full Member

Old 01-21-2020, 10:44 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

Kids aren't stupid; the reason they misbehave more when a substitute is present is because they're aware that their actions won't have consequences. In schools where their actions DO have consequences, students are generally better behaved. This push to call subs something else, to me at least, just seems like another example of administrators dreaming up more stuff that doesn't work while ignoring basic truths that everyone who's worked with kids for a week will probably understand.

Now, from my perspective, I don't care what I'm called. Though I'll admit, I do get bitter when I'm called a teacher. I'm not paid like one. I'm not respected like one. More often than not, I feel like district admin call me a teacher when it's convenient to dump extra unpaid responsibility on me. They'll say things like "you're just like a real teacher!" when it's time to drop last minute online gradebook work on me that they didn't give me access to all month but now want done with no warning a day before my term expires. Or "substitutes are no different from real teachers!" when their "real teacher" left with no lesson plans despite knowing he'd be gone for months and they want me to come up with a lesson plan for kids I don't know, from scratch, until their "real teacher" (who's earning more money on leave than I am while actually teaching his class) comes back. But then I'm "just a sub" when it's time to pay me properly for my work, or put me on the same benefits plans as their "real teachers" so I can get basic health checkups like everyone else, or on the same payroll system so I can get paid at the beginning of the month like everyone else instead of the 10th after all my bills are due. I think it's stupid. I'm more than happy to teach when the opportunity arises, but if I call myself a real teacher then I'm forced to ask myself where my real teacher salary/benefits/respect have been hiding for the last few years.


And yeah I know it's not the intent behind it. I don't get mad when a teacher writes "dear guest teacher" at the beginning of a note. I really don't care at all on that level. But when admin try and do it like this, it's just super embittering for me. I doubt most people feel this way, but I hear it a lot in this district since I've been working here a while, and it gets super annoying. "Wow, you're just like a full time teacher!" when I can't even write a budget for a month because I don't know how much money I'll make each month, have scheduled jobs cancel on me at the last minute, get hit with "reasonable assurance" of re-employment in the summer to stop me from collecting unemployment while I'm laid off for 3 months, and basically have no stability at all. Don't act like we're the same. So sick of districts trying to pay lip service like this and then paying less than Burger King, while demanding a 4 year degree and expecting "Real Teacher" quality because they arbitrarily decide we're real teachers when it's convenient to them.

Last edited by Aillya; 01-21-2020 at 11:00 AM..
Aillya is offline   Reply With Quote
bodhimom bodhimom is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

bodhimom
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

Old 01-21-2020, 12:39 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

I think some of the problem with this might be that subs (or whatever you want to call us) are out of touch with what teachers really do. They are not spoon-fed as much as has been stated. There is misinformation on this board. Teachers are not given the tests they have to use, they are not told when to each whatever the topic is. There are state standards, but the teacher is given great latitude as to how to teach it. I think I understand more than most, because I've been a teacher, in a public school. Teachers have a lot of latitude. More than most on here might think.

If teachers are told everything they have to do, it is probably because it is thought that they need extra guidance - for some reason they aren't getting the trust that most teachers have.

My point is that teachers are a lot more than perpetual daily subs.

Last edited by bodhimom; 01-21-2020 at 03:22 PM..
bodhimom is offline   Reply With Quote
MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,449
Senior Member

MaineSub
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,449
Senior Member
Luv2teach2017
Old 01-21-2020, 05:00 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

Luv2teach, we just might be kindred spirits.

Quote:
In truth, no label or title can distinguish one type from the other. But I guarantee you, the students know the difference.
I would add that the teachers know the difference as well. I think we sometimes get so focused on the differences that we (subs and regular) forget what we have (hopefully!) in common.

When we only focus on the differences, there's this tendency towards judging superiority and inferiority... that's a thinly-veiled theme that often appears on this board. Sometimes it borders on class warfare--one reason I tend not to comment on what are clearly venting threads.

I work very hard to partner with teachers and I find most are open to it... It's not that one of us is superior or inferior... we are simply different and have different roles with the same goals. It helps that we're a comparatively small school and have a reasonably good team spirit--not perfect, certainly. But it's not based on what we call each other. It's based on what we do and how we treat each other. The labels should reflect reality; they don't create it.

Quote:
Sometimes I'll take time during recess or after class to help students who need extra help understanding their lessons. If that isn't being a teacher, what is?
Can I get an "Amen?" I sometimes take time during recess or at the end of the day to "work with" a teacher. We sometimes joke about getting PD credit for some of our discussions. I've also (working in concert with a teacher) come to school on a volunteer basis to work with a kid who I "clicked" with in terms of my teaching and their learning style... one teacher and I "double-teamed" a kid who was really struggling with math. The key is we weren't competing. All three of us felt really good about it... I'm not telling the story to brag; I'm pointing out that we are more alike than different.

Language is certainly important--one reason I made the original post--but the words should reflect what we care about and we should keep focused on that.
MaineSub is offline   Reply With Quote
bodhimom bodhimom is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

bodhimom
 
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 153
Full Member

Old 01-21-2020, 05:09 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

I have been saying these same things, but many in this thread misunderstand me, for some reason. I'm done.
bodhimom is offline   Reply With Quote
luv2teach2017 luv2teach2017 is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member

luv2teach2017
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 369
Senior Member
Thanks MaineSub
Old 01-21-2020, 07:19 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

This is definitely an interesting discussion, MaineSub. Maybe we are kindred spirits...lol (although our situations are very different... we live on opposite sides of the country, and I work at many different elementary schools in a large, sprauling metropolitan school district. ) I have to agree that I generally work well with the full-time teachers because we have the same ultimate aim at heart...to help the students learn. There's usually a mutual understanding and respect between us. Any issues I encounter usually involve other adults (mainly the aides), seldom the teachers.

bohimom: I have first-hand knowledge of the curriculum and requirements, including testing, that lower elementary grade teachers must adhere to in California. They have very little autonomy these days. Perhaps your teaching experience was in another state and/ or secondary level grades?

Last edited by luv2teach2017; 01-22-2020 at 04:53 AM..
luv2teach2017 is offline   Reply With Quote
Fractured Fractured is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 331
Full Member

Fractured
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 331
Full Member

Old 01-22-2020, 10:33 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

I have to weigh in on the spoon feeding topic. Maybe I missed people saying that, but I canít recall it being a constant thing brought up on this board. I did my student teaching in a middle school a few years ago. The school still bought their main curriculum from an education company, and that seems to be the norm. My mentor didnít use it, but some teachers taught right out of the book, like word for word. We definitely had to teach the kids certain things because there were district assessments. I had to design and teach a whole unit on myths because that is what the district assessment was about. This must have been at least a three week unit or longer. I remember killing myself to find myths from around the world and there were teachers from other schools in the district just teaching right out of this bought curriculum and one teacher was even showing the kids old looney tunes videos to teach them about myths. There wasnít pressure at the school to teach it one way or the other, but some teachers made it their own and others just mailed it in. Regardless, there was a lot of stuff these teachers had to incorporate into their unit planning to satisfy the district, and it was getting worse each year.

I see more autonomy in high schools as far as what books English teachers can use. I canít speak for elementary as Iíve never taught it.
Fractured is offline   Reply With Quote
Hello836498
 
 
Guest

Hello836498
 
 
Guest
Subs in the News (Headlines)
Old 01-23-2020, 05:57 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

What I always find interesting is whenever a sub makes the news for something bad, they refer to the sub as a "teacher" in the headline.
For example - "Teacher accused of hitting student". Then when the announcer talks (or you read the online article), you find out it is a sub involved and not the full-time classroom teacher.
To me, it is 2 clearly defined jobs - one job title should be [math/science/4th grade/etc] teacher since they are assigned to a specific grade/curriculum, and the other job title should be substitute teacher (who can cover multiple subjects) and fills in (ie "subs") as needed.
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Substitute Teachers
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:07 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net