Subjects and Predicates - help - ProTeacher Community



SMH
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SMH
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Subjects and Predicates - help
Old 10-09-2005, 09:46 AM
 
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This year my class really is struggling with Language Arts. So far we have worked on types of sentences and subjects and predicates (simple, complete, compound). I finished the unit but am planning on going back to it, any great ideas?


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Donna
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Old 10-10-2005, 02:16 PM
 
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I'm not sure I have any 'great' ideas, but this one is fun. Give each child a sentence strip, and tell them to write a sentence. Then have them cut the strip between the subject and the predicate. Knowing where to cut is part of the lesson. Then mix up all the subjects and all the predicates and have kids come up and hold up one of each. They end up with sentences like "My dog / forgot his lunch money." They really enjoy it, and you will too.
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nikkis1
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Great idea!
Old 10-16-2005, 05:47 AM
 
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Donna, what a great idea. I have a subject/predicate lesson this week...gonna use that strategy after input! Thanks so much!
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Mandy 4th
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Mandy 4th
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Subject and Predicate
Old 10-16-2005, 06:07 AM
 
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I usually tell my students that the subject is the "Who" and sometimes the what and the Predicate is the "Do." We make up a chant with hand motions saying "the subject is the who and the predicate is the do."

I write sentences on different colored sentence strips. I then cut apart the subjects and predicates. I give each student half the sentence and they try to find the person with the matching subject/ predicate. Then they come tell me which is which. They love this one.
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Constance
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Constance
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subject predicate song
Old 10-16-2005, 12:01 PM
 
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Subject/Predicate is such a difficult concept. I started in four weeks ago, but we've been testing in between so I'll return to it again this week.

My students do love my "Subject/Predicate" song. I found the words on the internet by simply googling subject predicate song. They sing it and remember the words. Last year the fifth grade teacher remarked that many of my kids remembered it.

Truthfully, the students don't fully master it so I work on it throughout the year. All we can do is our best. When I revisit it in the spring the students seem to get the concept a little better. Good luck.


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sj
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my thoughts
Old 10-21-2005, 11:13 PM
 
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I think we often expect kids to see subjects and predicates before we've taught them their parts. Assuming they already can identify nouns and verbs...First, teach the state of being verbs...I mean have them memorize a list of them in a specific order such as: be being been am are is was were do does did have has had can could will would shall should. Post the list on the board by clustering them into their sets. Next teach prepositions. Again, teach a preset list of prepositions. Some lists have only the 20 most common, others have as many as 60 or 70. Choose the list best suited for your grade. I taught 60 to my 2nd graders. Post the list in your classroom. NOW your students are ready to look for subjects and predicates.
1. Look for the prepositions. Circle them. Ask "What" to find the words that belong to them (around...around what?...around the yard) Draw an oval that includes both the preposition and its object (it will look like a big closed safety pin...so I told my kids to "pin" the preposition), The preposition and its object will not be part of either the simple subject or the simple predicate so they can be eliminated.
2. Look for and action word. If you can't find one, look for a state of being verb. That is probably your simple predicate. Double underline that verb.
3. Look for a noun that is not in a "pin". Find the noun that goes with the verb and is the "who" of the sentence. (I taught them to refer to anything doing the action as a who, even if it was the desk,) Underline that noun.
4. Look for another noun--there may not be one, but if there is--that is getting something done to it. That is your direct object. Put it in a box...it belongs to the predicate.
5. Say just the simple subject (who noun) and the simple predicate (action or state of being verb).
6. Say the part of the sentence that goes with the simple subject. (complete subject)
7. Say the part of the sentence that goes with the verb. (complete predicate.)

This sounds quite involved, but actually simplifies finding the subject and predicate when they can eliminate parts of the sentence. I've taught it this way to first graders (YEP...first graders!!! ok, they were high level first! and recently helped a 7th grader who was having trouble finding subject and predicate and found that it made it so much easier once you got rid of all the prepositional phrases and the direct object.

I know a lot of teachers would balk at teaching all seven parts of speech in first or second grade, but when I did it made teaching writing so much easier...they knew what I meant when I said they could make a sentence more interesting by adding a prepositional phrase about the boy, or that they needed to have an action verb instead of state of being verb...It gave them the language of writing so that they could talk about what they were doing. Why we delay this, I don't know...we teach them math words like add and subtract, sum, difference, equal...but we shy away from teaching language words like preposition, conjunction, and such....

OK...I sorta got off on my soapbox there, didn't I!!! Can you tell that I love to teach English and writing???
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Jayme
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sub. pred.
Old 11-03-2005, 10:11 AM
 
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SMH,
I have a great subject predicate song that goes to the tune of A tisket A Tasket that we sing everyday during that unit. The kids love it take turns leading the class in in. I would be glad to email it to you if you want it. My email is jayme.oder@lowndes.k12.ga.us, I'll reply to your email with the song.
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gaya
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game
Old 03-25-2008, 10:16 AM
 
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Split the class into two groups. Have one group write only a complete subject on its card/paper. The other group writes only a complete predicate only on its card/paper. Then, send them to find a partner of the opposite group. Go around the room and read the complete sentence of each pair. The sentences may sound goofy, but it will be a complete sentence. Kids love it!
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gunujgbluh
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gunujgbluh
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uhguyjb;uoihj
Old 09-15-2008, 05:06 PM
 
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si, all you have to do is really tri and force them to ask question but dont make it to confusing for them. just make it simple and easy. start with simple stuff and move into the harder stuff!

- Unonimous
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123123
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Awsome
Old 11-13-2008, 06:11 PM
 
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Yes i know that you teach it that way but how about when the preposition is also part of the complete subject?
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sainsowrth
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sainsowrth
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7th Grade Language Arts
Old 08-28-2009, 05:46 PM
 
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What a great idea! You could have students illustrate their new sentences when they are finished. You'd have some interesting art!
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em<333
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em<333
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sub. and pred.
Old 01-04-2010, 12:35 PM
 
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okayyyyyyy im a student i dont get subject and predict its so hard helppppppppppp!
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What's the website?
Old 05-15-2010, 06:15 PM
 
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what is the website that you found the lyrics?
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Old 10-22-2011, 06:11 PM
 
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Donna,

LOooooove this! Am putting it in my lesson plans RIGHT NOW.
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Old 10-22-2011, 06:14 PM
 
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Split the class into two groups. Have one group write only a complete subject on its card/paper. The other group writes only a complete predicate only on its card/paper. Then, send them to find a partner of the opposite group. Go around the room and read the complete sentence of each pair. The sentences may sound goofy, but it will be a complete sentence. Kids love it!

Gaya - I'm LOOoooving this one too!!! Thanks a bunch!
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