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Rhyming
Old 01-30-2008, 06:09 PM
 
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I am being observed tomorrow on a rhyming lesson. I am wondering, what is the ebst way to explain rhyming to children. I was thinking about phrasing it like this "when two words sound the same at the end, they rhyme." Does that make sense?


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Old 01-30-2008, 06:16 PM
 
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I would imagine a number of kids in your class (at least) already know how to rhyme. I would write a word on the board such as cat and ask students to come up with words that rhyme. Write down each word under the word cat. After a decent list is generated as the students to look at your list and tell you what they notice about it. If they need more prompting ask them what is the same in every word. Guide them to the realization that they all end with the same sound (-at). For kids in my class who have trouble with rhyme I found that helping them discover themselves what a rhyme is can be very helpful.
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rhyming
Old 01-30-2008, 06:25 PM
 
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I do not want to give the children a misconception that words must be spelled the same at the end in order to rhyme. I am going to be leading a large group discussion, and I will show them through examples, but I would like to explain it in a simple sentence. Does that sentence that i gave before make sense to you;"words that sound the same at the end will rhyme." That way they realize store and door rhyme (the sound the same at the end), but they do not have the same spelling at the end.
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a hunting we will go...
Old 01-31-2008, 02:04 AM
 
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I think your sentence made sense. one idea is to use the song "A Hunting We Will Go." Write it on sentence strips and then make picture cards of rhyming words to fill in the blanks.
A hunting we will go,
a hunting we will go,
we'll catch a ___ (fox),
and put him in a ___ (box),
and then we'll let him go.

say what could we put the fox in that rhymes or sounds like fox? could we put him in a bag? (then say fox...bag...do they sound the same?)
a cage? (repeat example). give another example then ask if we could put him in a box. fox...box...do they sound the same?
(Other rhyming word/picture cards I use: bear/chair; mouse/house; cat/mat - change in to on; pup/cup; etc.)

A great book to read to go with that song is A-Hunting We Will Go! By Steven Kellogg. It's a bedtime version and he makes up other great rhymes (ex. We'll tickle a giraffe and make him laugh! or Moose and Goose are on the loose!) My students love that story (as do my own children!)
after we did a group activity with the song, my kids picked two things to fill in the blanks with and they illustrated them for a class book.
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Lesson
Old 01-31-2008, 02:41 PM
 
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I like Addie's idea a lot and think you would have great success with that.

A rhyming activity I do early in the year is this:

I first Read a short book with lots of rhymes (that are recognizable objects) to my students.

Then I pass out a picture card to each student (each one has a picture of one of the objects from the read aloud and is labeled underneath it).

Students then have to find their "rime".

They are all engaged and saying their word and hearing their word and trying to find their match. SO when cat finds hat they sit together and wait.

We then share our rhymes and talk about how we knew they were rhymes. The kids generate GREAT hypothesis about it.


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I would say
Old 01-31-2008, 04:49 PM
 
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they sound the same in the middle and at the end!
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Old 01-31-2008, 05:38 PM
 
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I also say they have the same middle and ending sounds. A fun activity we do is the Hickory Dickory Dock song, and make up other verses to go with the numbers such as "The clock struck 8, the mouse said, 'I'm late'!" We just did it as a review of rhyming words when we did our time unit. Fun practice with both.
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Old 01-31-2008, 06:46 PM
 
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I explain rhyming words as a "word family". Like many people in our family have the same last name so do rhyming words. Their last name might be "at" so c-at and b-at, etc. all belong to the same word family.
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I agree
Old 02-01-2008, 05:44 AM
 
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As with PPs, I say words rhyme when they sound the same at the "middle and end."
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Old 02-02-2008, 10:13 AM
 
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I work with many kids who have severe receptive language issues (ie they have no idea what the %$@ you're talking about 60% of the time), and I've found that rhyming is often best understood simply by lots of exposure to it. We read a ton of rhyming poetry and stories, listen to songs with rhymes in it, and play a game called "The Ship is Loaded With..." where I identify a word (say, "cats"), and they suggest other things that rhyme with that word that can also go in the ship ("hats, bats, rats...") I have a big laminated ship and pictures of things that rhyme that we tape onto the ship.

I also have a bunch of photo cards, and I arrange them in groups of three: 2 rhyme, one doesn't. We sing the Sesame Street song "One of these things is not like the other ones..." while I put a group of three on the pocket chart, saying each name slowly and having the kids echo. Then, a volunteer identifies the one that doesn't belong, another volunteer says why not (the answer is always "it doesn't rhyme", so even the lower kids can do this and feel good about it), another volunteer says the names of the two that do rhyme, and everybody gives a "thumbs up" to show that they rhyme.

I don't think very many of my students could explain what a rhyme is, exactly, but most of them could give you a lot of examples and everybody recognizes rhymes when they hear them ("thumbs up"). For now, I think that's close enough--in first grade, they'll be thinking more about the sound the same and spell the same stuff, but for now, what matters is that they know it when they hear it or say it.
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