How difficult is it to find a teaching job? - ProTeacher Community





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How difficult is it to find a teaching job?
Old 04-13-2006, 08:38 PM
 
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I hear that teachers are in demand. Yet, they're losing their jobs due to budget cuts. And I have not been able to find open positions on most California school district websites. I am not currently a teacher. I'm 31 and considering pursuing a Masters in Education so that I can teach elementary school. I'm worried that I will not be able to find a job after graduating, especially since I will be starting as an older new teacher. I have a BS in Biology now. What are my chances? How competetive is it?


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Biology?
Old 04-15-2006, 03:23 AM
 
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I know that in Massachusetts, there is a high demand for qualified science, math, and special ed teachers, but usually at the High school or middle school level. Here we have what's called "fast track" licensure for people who have degrees in math or science that want to teach. You don't have to have a masters in education, just licensure which is usually about half the classes.

Go to the college grad department and speak to admissions people. They can steer you in the right direction as far as who to talk to about options. Also, the Dept of education website may have info as well.

As far as job security, though, elementary may not be the way to go.
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Teaching jobs ARE hard to land
Old 04-19-2006, 04:20 PM
 
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I was laid off from a job I had for 23 years. I always wanted to teach, so I go get my Master's in Education. It's has been one year since I graduated and I've only been on 3 interviews. I don't get any of the jobs - in fact way younger 4 year degree candidates get the job. So in my experience if you are older (I never thought 40 was old until I started looking for teaching jobs) and have a Master's degree with less than 2 years experience, forget it. The little extra you have to be paid for the higher education is frowned upon in many school districts. They say there is a teaching shortage, especially in math, science, and technology. Elementary jobs are hard to land because more people want elementary versus secondary. Maybe in some states there are, but not in Illinois. I find education to be very political - you get a job by who you know, not your credentails. Sorry to discourage you, but I'm trying to tell it the way it is, at least from my experiences.
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Twelve hundred resumes
Old 04-23-2006, 11:00 AM
 
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was what one district had for a position I applied for in NJ. I managed to get an interview, but not the job. I was 49 and had two years of public school experience under my belt. I also had about six years experience as a sub, no Masters.

The nice thing they should consider is they will never have to pay an older teacher top salary as I probably will retire before I reach their step 10 or 15.

Still searching, and reading articles how they are re-hiring retired teachers. I really don't believe age is a negative factor. Follow up is a must or your resume will get lost. Last year, half the resumes I e-mailed were never opened as believe it or not, they were being sent to people who could not open attachments. FOLLOW UP and good luck to us all.
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BS in biology
Old 04-23-2006, 11:03 AM
 
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There is a shortage nation wide for science teachers. If you are willing to start off teaching science in a middle school, you can always submit requests for elementary in a few years.


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Teacher Shortage
Old 04-25-2006, 02:15 PM
 
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I think it also depends on where you are willing to teach.

I teach in the inner city, have a masters, am about your age, and was a career changer. I had no problem getting a position and know that there are lots of positions available.

There are downsides to teaching in large urban areas, but it is a pretty good way to cut your teeth and get some experience.

Sometimes schools don't post job openings until later in the spring and early summer too. Things are still shaking out from this year, teachers in the system need first dib on transfer positions, and many people have not yet notified thier schools of their intentions for next year.
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late response, but hey...
Old 11-07-2006, 10:08 AM
 
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North Carolina still has a huge teaching shortage. No union, lower pay than most western or northeastern states. School districts vary widely in quality, cost of living varies even more....

Good Luck!!
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With a BS, you'll teach.
Old 05-02-2008, 03:33 AM
 
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Science and math and the most in demand. Especially in the inner-city schools. It depends on where you want to work but you can teach Biology. There are web sites like Chicago Teaching Fellows, for people who have science backgrounds in the private sector, encouraging people to teach. Good Luck
 
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MO just announced yesterday
Old 05-02-2008, 05:37 AM
 
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that the Alternate certification for degreed career changers will be even easier than before, especially in Middle or high school.
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Getting a teaching job
Old 05-02-2008, 05:53 AM
 
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Have you thought of looking for Alternative Certification Programs in other states? Teaching is also my second career, and that's how I became certified. If you have enough money saved, maybe you can take that route. It sounds like you may need to relocate. I work in Houston, and our ACP program has cycles every three months (I think) when they only used to do it once a year. Currently, there are about 250 instructional posititons available. Our district also gives stipends to teachers who teach in critical shortage areas (Math, Science, Bilingual, ESL, and Special Education).
Also, sometimes you just may need to go to a school and submit a resume. Some schools don't post available positions because too many teachers would apply for the job.
Good luck!!
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Old 07-25-2008, 03:54 PM
 
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I am currently on the hunt for an elementary teaching position. The word on the street is that due to the crappy economy and our crappy president, many teachers who would normally be retiring are staying on to save some moola. I have a Master's plus over 10 years experience and a stellar record, but still haven't landed a job after moving to a new state. The good news for you may be that since you would be new, you would appeal to districts who want more than one teacher for the price of me. I am not giving up though-it is also very common for openings to occur just before school starts up in the fall after schools receive their enrollment numbers or any last minute staff changes. My husband teaches upper level math and discovered that their are many more options for teachers with a secondary teaching degree plus endorsements in particular areas (math/science/social studies). Worst case scenario you could work at Starbucks...oh, ya-they are closing stores though because of our crappy president/economy too. Peace!
 
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Very difficult
Old 09-10-2009, 10:04 AM
 
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When I was getting my master's in education six years ago our professors told us daily what a teacher shortage there was and that there were so many available jobs. Imagine my shock when I graduated and was looking for a job, only to find that there's no teacher shortage at all, only a teaching job shortage! It is very difficult because no federal money goes to education and teaching jobs are being cut. I live in the Portland Oregon area and it is so hard that it's even gotten difficult to get substitute teaching calls. But universities keep taking exorbitant amounts of tuition money from people to be in these graduate programs, knowing full well how flooded the teaching market it.
 
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hoping for no snow
Old 01-05-2010, 07:47 PM
 
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Your statement regarding the tuition and the misleading information that are characteristic of institutions of higher learning are very accurate. Substitute teaching does not alleviate the financial burden and living in a state that has already had 4 snow days makes the situation worse. What would it be like to wish for a snow day or even a holiday?
 
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Old 01-06-2010, 06:14 AM
 
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My district has already told us they are cutting next year. Our regulation to hold K-3rd at 20 students is over, so we will not need as many teachers. Anyone who has 5 years or less will be in danger of being let go. I'm in CA central valley.
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It's VERY Hard
Old 02-16-2010, 07:52 PM
 
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I have found that it is extremely hard to land teaching job. No matter how bad districts calm they need teachers, it seems they overlook the best when it is sitting in their face.

I have been diligently looking for a teaching position for the last two years, no luck yet. Just looking is draining and discouraging. I have even thought about going back to school to maybe get a business degree. But my passion for education and working with children and young adults makes me hang in there.

I recently realized that with the majority of school systems, its all about who you know and the connections you make. I began subbing in the fall of 2009 and it has opened doors for me. Although I haven't landed a position as a full-time teacher, I was able to take on a long-term sub assignment. I was thrown in a classroom with absolutely nothing (no lesson plans, teacher's guide, paper, no access to technology, nothing at all). I took on responsibilities that the majority of subs will never have to deal with, such as making lesson plans, recording grades, attending parent/teacher conferences, professional development, etc. To top it off, I was teaching 6th science and my undergrad is in English.

It was the BEST experience I ever had and made me realize that I truly want to teach. The administrators at the school, the 6th grade team leader, and many other teachers supported me so much and constantly told me what a great job I was doing. Now, I have people who I can ask for recommendations and I "know people." Now I feel confident that things will work out for me and I will have my own classroom very soon.

I said all that to say this: if you are finding it difficult to land a full-time position, consider subbing. It allows you to network and learn the system better. Breaking in the teaching field is hard, but there are ways to work yourself in there.

Hang in there, and don't give up. Also, try programs like Teach For America and The New Teacher Project.
 
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Teaching Jobs not available
Old 06-23-2010, 12:37 PM
 
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For the past two months I've been applying to any type of teaching job both in Los Angeles and Orange County (in CA). I've applied to over 60 teaching jobs and substitute jobs in public, private, and charter schools, and have not gotten a response, interview, and obviously a position. There is honestly no hope for new teacher in this area. All of the teaching jobs I have seen posted asks the candidate to have at least 2 years of experience and/or a clear credential. I do not want to move to another state because I can't afford it. Does anyone have any suggestions?
 
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Idea to Get An Interview
Old 07-29-2010, 07:16 AM
 
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I live in the Chicago area, and jobs are so hard to find here. I have my M.A. And this is my third summer looking for a teaching position. A principal once told me that if a school uses Applitrack applications, you should submit applications more than once. Each time an application is submitted, it goes to the top of the principal's list. Since principals receive so many applications, it pays to be as close to the top as possible.
Also, I have been called for an interview before a job is posted. I apply to as many districts as possible each day, whether they have postings or not. Now if only I could find out how to ace the interview, I would be set!
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Old 10-01-2010, 04:28 PM
 
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I have been teaching for 20 years and I was let go from my teaching position of 11 years due to budget cuts. You are so right when you say that 40 is old. I've applied for about 50 different positions in the last year and a half and I had about 3 interviews. I'm subbing right now and making much less that I have ever made. I can't live on what I make as a sub. It seems that all the younger teachers get hired while I get told that I'm over qualified. It won't help me to go back to school because that will make me even more over qualified. What can I do? I can't make myself younger or take away my experience.
 
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That's BS!
Old 10-28-2010, 03:33 PM
 
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A BSc will still not get anyone a job. I've applied, I have several degrees (including B.Sc in math and biology), I have over 5 years of experience, and damn it, I'm a DAMN GOOD TEACHER too, and I'm struggling to find a job. "Struggling" doesn't mean that I just "keep trying". No, I've sent out over 50 resumes and cover letters. What the?! It's bad everywhere.

I've noticed that many teachers who should have retired have not. Also, many teachers who were retired are the ones who are called back to sub, or replace, or even go full-time "because we know them". Job openings here aren't necessarily being posted, and nepotism is sky high in Quebec. The largest school board in Montreal - EMSB - has not posted a single teaching position in years, yet they ask teachers to simply "apply" using applytoeducation.com where TEACHERS must PAY to send in their resumes without any promise of hire (nor any knowledge of openings, of course).

There needs to be an entire restructuring here in Quebec and in many other places in Canada. The idea of School Boards here is failing our kids. Do you know how many uncertified teachers are teaching because they "can't find any teachers"?! Ins't that incredible! Teachers are waiting for phone calls, sending in their resumes and paying for it, and instead friends and relatives are being hired to fill positions because "there aren't enough teachers in Quebec"! Our situation here is dispicable. It is so dangerous to even speak about this in public for fear of not being hired. Subjective vs objective hiring, caring only about who is helping who and politics...WHEN WILL WE BE THINKING OF THE KIDS WE TEACH? WHEN WILL THEY FINALLY COME FIRST?!
 
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Old 01-19-2011, 08:14 AM
 
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You are so VERY right. I am in the exact same situation. Thing is though when I was studying for my MAT, all the professors at my university were wrongfully telling us what a teacher shortage there is out there and what an open market it is. Imagine my shock when I learned the truth. As a result I have been substitute teaching for almost seven years living on pay well below the poverty level and having no medical benefits at all. Good luck.
 

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